Extended warranty for 2016-2018 Turbo/drivetrain due to oil dillution?

  1. 1981CBX

    1981CBX Senior Member

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    Would you get in a plane where the pilot didn't check the oil? We have a company policy that the oil levels in our turboprop engines are checked before AND after a flight. Also note, the ECU prolly makes a note each time the hood is raised. This was part of the VW TDI variable service plan to get 21K miles out of an oil "change", so it wouldn't be to much of a stretch to see Honda doing the same thing with their cars in regards to percentage of oil use remaining.
     
  2. JT Si

    JT Si Senior Member

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    That sounds exactly like something VW would do and something Honda would not.
     
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  3. Gruber

    Gruber Senior Member

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    #33 Gruber, May 28, 2019
    Last edited: May 28, 2019
    I bet prolly it doesn't. :hmm:

    I looked at the VW page. Their fixed schedule is generally 10,000 miles or 12 months. Their Longlife or flexible schedule is when the light comes on like MM, but it may extend "up to" 18,000 miles or 24 months. It might be figured out a little differently from Honda. I would definitely pick the fixed schedule for myself based on conditions below because why not?

    The whole competition who can hold the oil longer is totally silly to me.

    Long ago back in the last century, I've seen on TV the "VW engineers" explain how it's a waste if a car is scrapped while some parts still work or are good. Like door locks and body metal. This would mean these parts were "over engineered," meaning too expensive. So they made it their challenge and a goal to make all parts so precisely designed that they all last the same time - the life of the car. :confused1: :crazy: Which they took as being about 10 years. This was presented as a car-manufacturing way of the future.
    After seeing this I knew they are crazy stupid and I swore to never buy a volkswagen in my life. I kept that promise.




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    https://www.yourmechanic.com/articl...n-service-indicator-lights-by-brent-minderler
     
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  4. SichuanHot

    SichuanHot Senior Member

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    This oil dilution situation is funny. In my old Audi I used to worry about it consuming too much oil. In this Civic I'm worried about my oil levels rising above what's normal.
     
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  5. herox

    herox Senior Member

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  6. xbbnx

    xbbnx Senior Member

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    Here we go again. Honda has been using this engine in North America for 4 years with a lot of drivers pushing over 60,000 miles and some even in the 100,000 miles mark already, and yet I am yet to see an article on Jalopnik or here or anywhere else about an engine seizing up because of oil dilution. Again Honda has sold hundreds of thousands of these engines, with little to no issues at all. Please do us all a favor and get rid of your Civics and stop with the bitching already.
     
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  7. nothome17

    nothome17 Senior Member

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  8. Cornercarver

    Cornercarver Senior Member

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    34,000 miles so far, and the only issue so far was a slightly leaking front left axle which I was told was a seal, which was replaced under warranty.
    No, I did not spot the leak, the dealer found it when it was in for its oil change. That happened just a few thousand miles ago. I don't check my oil levels as I
    a) run full synthetic and b) change out the oil and filter every 3 to 4,000 miles. Early? Yes. Cheap insurance when driving a car in Arizona heat? To be sure.
     
  9. Civics4Ever

    Civics4Ever Rally Red EXT

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    Over 70k miles. Oil dilution, yes. Any engine problems, nope. 16 EXT with the dreaded cvt.
     
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  10. gtman

    gtman Senior Member

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    #40 gtman, May 28, 2019
    Last edited: May 28, 2019
    Yes, DI engines suffer from oil dilution to an extent. There's no doubt about that. And if the dilution gets severe, problems can happen.

    But let's look at this calmly. The dilution problem tends to be the worst in engines that never warm up. In other words, short drives and/or cold weather is problematic.

    It seems to me the key is just making sure you get the engine up to normal operating temps and doing timely oil changes. If you have to drive a few extra miles on your commute is that really a big deal if it helps? I'm not saying this is much ado about nothing but I think far too many people are in panic mode over this.
     
  11. frontlinegeek

    frontlinegeek Senior Member

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    OK, so there seems to be some exaggeration from those criticizing those that are reasonably frustrated....

    This is a straw man. People are legit concerned that the legendary mileage that a Honda engine should get, will be less possible with this engine.

    Putting an additional year and an UNLIMITED distance warranty on the 1.5T in at least 3 years of one model and 2 years of another model of literally their most popular two models in North America is not "little to no". It is a giant red flag that Honda KNOWS there is a premature wear issue and that it is likely to occur on many of these specific engines. Their actuaries have done their work and this is the mitigation choice they have decided is best for them and for us. I don't agree with it but it is what it is and at least I personally am not affected.

    So all of Canada except the Vancouver lowlands, all of the northern states that border with Canada and several south of that too. So OK, ya, no problem here o_Oo_Oo_O Add on the average commute is only about 25 minutes one way and without knowing PRECISELY the minimum drive time needed for a given low temperature (THAT would be a fun X/Y chart to have to have in your car...), there is no way for the average user to be able to reliably know if it is now safe to call it long/far enough.

    Like it or not, this is a black mark on Honda at least for some 16-19 Civics and all 17-18 CRVs. It is not the end of the world on the forest level but there sure as hell are some trees that are going to be rightly pissed considering the money spent is theirs and not yours (Those rolling their eyes at the upset people).

    I have indeed told my parents to hold off getting a CRV until they have heard that the issue is resolved at the factory level. They have a Gen1 Ridgeline and are still plenty happy with it for now. And as for Civics, I am personally staying with my EX till it is paid for and then I will reassess what the fracking hell is the long term deal with all these turbos and GDI solutions. (Frankly, I am actually hoping that the next purchase is an electric so these issues are all gone). Beyond that, I will recommend the 2.0NA for anyone that asks me. I don't need the bad juju coming back on me if I send someone into a 1.5T and it turns into a horror story on them.
     
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  12. xbbnx

    xbbnx Senior Member

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    All I am saying is show me a horror story directly related/caused by the oil dilution since the inception of the 1.5T in our Civics. You will find none. But you will find countless posts on here where someone says "About to hit 80,000 (or whatever high mileage number you like) miles on my Civic and so far no issues". Dont you think that if this oil dilution thing was an issue we would have seen so many problems by now with all these Civics running around North America? Everybody so far has been bitching and crying about what CAN happen instead of what HAS happened, and its annoying. Quit your bitching or move on to a bland bread brand like Toyota, and maybe run into their transmission issues or maybe not.
     
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  13. gtman

    gtman Senior Member

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    #43 gtman, May 28, 2019
    Last edited: May 29, 2019
    frontlinegeek, glad you have the safe and exciting 2.0 but I'm still glad I bought the turbo. Maybe you can get a job with Consumer Reports? :cool:
     
  14. 1981CBX

    1981CBX Senior Member

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    What isn’t readily apparent in the great information in your post is the fact that the oil for the TDI is a long life detergent oil, VW Spec 507. With the TDI “clean diesel” engine, soot was not suspended so much in the oil anymore, but sent to the diesel particulate filter where it was captured and then later burned off during cycles whereby a cylinder was run rich for the cycle. But, back to the oil. Because it is a detergent oil, new oil introduced during a change started a stripping process that removed a protective coating on metal parts. Then, the oil would redeposit the protective coating on the engine parts. This process induces a calculated wear on the engine, prematurely changing the oil caused needless wear to occur. The VW Spec 507 oil was tested to 30,000 miles, derated to 21K for variable service plan users in Europe and further derated to 10,000 miles for U.S. users accustomed to non variables in car maintenance. That said, I went to 10K on oil changes and even at 210K miles there was never a need to add oil between changes, but what I really liked was when it came due in the brutal cold spells during Wisconsin winters, I could wait the weather out and change it on a more clement day without worry.
     
  15. Gruber

    Gruber Senior Member

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    #45 Gruber, May 28, 2019
    Last edited: May 29, 2019
    Yes, there is a way to know the truth. :yes: It's called the dipstick.:thumbsup:
    You don't need to pull out a calculator or make a chart of commute lengths to put on your windshield. Just pull out yer dipstick once in a moon.
    It'll tell ya whether your drives are too short.

    I might be a little extreme,:spaz: but for those people who don't do the dipstick and for this reason are deep into a dark uncertainty about oil dilution I have those choices:
    - hire someone who will check the dipstick ( and fill'er up when at it)
    - get a chauffeur
    - ride a bus
    - walk, or switch to a bike
    - get a Tesla. They don't have oil dilution or any other worries
     
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