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Fatherpain’s 2018 Type R

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fatherpain

fatherpain

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  • #121
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Routed the fog light connector and wiring through grommet (P22) and installed to the top of the cooler ducting.


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Inserted the last (2) conical seals to the oil line fittings that connect to the oil mount.


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Connected the shorter hose to the fitting closest to the oil cooler and tightened. Was careful not to cross thread and made sure the line didn’t touch any piping.


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Did the same for the longer hose.


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Perfect fitment for the supply and return lines. Plenty of space for standard size oil filters in the future. :)


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Installed the HKS oil filter. Dabbed clean oil on the o-ring. 3/4 turn past contact by hand.


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There are a few steps remaining, but almost there. Still need to figure out what to do with this.
:(



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fatherpain

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Described the problem at work and received a suggestion to use a nutsert tool. Works similar to a rivet gun, but installs a threaded insert instead. Would work perfect for thin metal such as this so will give it a shot ;)
 

hpbyhermann

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I use rivnuts on builds at work all the time, they work great. If I can suggest that you get a 90 degree installer so you can use it in tight quarters. The straight installers only work when you have plenty of tool clearance.
 
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fatherpain

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Thank you for the tip Hermann. Hopefully the nut setter I ordered will work. If not, will try one of these, unless there is a specific one you recommend?

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Hey Tom, I don't remember the name of the one that I have. It is at my shop and I won't be back to work until Thursday. I'll let you know what brand I have then.
 

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Tom, did the conical seals come with the kit or did you add them? Reason I ask is that AN fittings(37 degree flare) are designed not to need any type of seal or gasket. In the shipbuilding industry, we do use conical seals on Nuclear test systems & I hate them. They cause more problems than they fix. I could see if you had a corroded/pitted male connector & the seal would give you a better sealing surface for a quick fix. But other than that, no. In my years of systems test gangs ( non-nuclear), we never used conical seals. Plus 30 years of drag racing, I never used one on any of my AN fittings.

Not bashing your build. Awesome write up & pics as always!!!!
 

PrisonerOfDoom

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Tom, did the conical seals come with the kit or did you add them? Reason I ask is that AN fittings(37 degree flare) are designed not to need any type of seal or gasket. In the shipbuilding industry, we do use conical seals on Nuclear test systems & I hate them. They cause more problems than they fix. I could see if you had a corroded/pitted male connector & the seal would give you a better sealing surface for a quick fix. But other than that, no. In my years of systems test gangs ( non-nuclear), we never used conical seals. Plus 30 years of drag racing, I never used one on any of my AN fittings.

Not bashing your build. Awesome write up & pics as always!!!!
HKS includes them with the kit. I haven't seen any reported issues with using them yet.
 
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fatherpain

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This. Thank you Chris for looking out. These seals are very soft aluminum and (4) are provided as Dustin mentioned. Glad to hear no reported issues so far with the HKS :)

Apologies for those following the oil cooler install, as it is taking more time than anticipated. There are a number reasons for this:

Time added to document and post (fun)
Obligations at home. *no comment haha, ok fun*
Back to work *doh*
Running into unforeseen snags like needing a special tool here *frustrating*

I also dropped a M6 bolt into that channel while making a dumb attempt to install it from the reverse direction through that unthreaded hole using a needle nose. Ended up having to remove the headlights and crash beam to expose the end of the hollow channel to retrieve it... My OCD side envisioned that bolt rattling around with the added vibration of the Hasport RMM. It’s out, but now there’s the added work of putting everything back together, heh.

Should have the cooler wrapped next time I get a pocket of time to focus on it ;)

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hpbyhermann

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Tom, did the conical seals come with the kit or did you add them? Reason I ask is that AN fittings(37 degree flare) are designed not to need any type of seal or gasket. In the shipbuilding industry, we do use conical seals on Nuclear test systems & I hate them. They cause more problems than they fix. I could see if you had a corroded/pitted male connector & the seal would give you a better sealing surface for a quick fix. But other than that, no. In my years of systems test gangs ( non-nuclear), we never used conical seals. Plus 30 years of drag racing, I never used one on any of my AN fittings.

Not bashing your build. Awesome write up & pics as always!!!!
100% agree with Chris on this. I install fuel systems on almost all the big power builds I do at my shop and anything AN fittings need nothing to seal them up. The 37 degree angles mate to each other.

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love the build! Hope you kept that old accord though. Those things were so cool back in the day. Great daily driver to have now. I really like the oil cooler. I have a weird oil cooler fetish lol. I'm running a setrab oil cooler, setrab lines and setrab thermostate with a subaru brz oil plate spacer LOL.
 
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Finally found time last night to get back to the cooler. Slipped out to the garage while the family was watching the movie Ratatouille. Thank god for that cooking rat!

After letting the car sit for a week, figured it would take a little while to remember how the crash beam went back on (and it did) AND the oil cooler was going to be a pain in the butt (and it certainly was). Haha

Reattached the crash beam and headlights and didn’t have any bolts or plastic clips leftover so was feeling pretty good. Then revisited the good old cooler...


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Needed access to this pesky unthreaded hole to install a nutsert, so unfastened all (3) brackets securing the core to the car. Detached this bracket from the core completely.


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Ordered one of these bad boys to accurately enlarge the hole for the nutsert.


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It’s commonly known as a step drill or unibit. A regular drill bit probably would have messed it up. The smaller “steps” fit in the hole to be enlarged and acts as a guide.


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Couldn’t see what was going on at the hole, so drilled a little at a time and checked until the nutsert would fit.


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Nutsert locked and loaded to the 13” handle nutsert tool. In hindsight could have gone with the pistol grip rivnut gun for tight spaces like hybyhermann suggested. Same price and more versatile. Got lucky and the nutsert tool fit (barely, heh)


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inserted the nutsert, squeezed the lever then unthreaded the tool.


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Behold!!! Nutsert installed and now there is a threaded hole for the final bracket bolt and spacer! Such an ingenious little device ;)


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TheShadow mentioned these bracket bolts falling off due to vibration on his build thread, so I added lock washers. Hopefully they will stay on.


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It was a total pain in the @ss getting the bracket back onto the core, so disconnected the oil line AN fitting to get room to work. It was also tough to get the spacer between the bracket and the car. Used a needle nose to insert the spacer while inserting the last bolt (not pictured).


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This inner core bracket connection isn’t tightened until the side that needed the nutsert is tightened to the car. Difficult to reach the nuts on the backside, but the Palmster ratchet did the trick. So useful in tight quarters! I guess they no longer make these, so are something of a collector’s item for tool junkies, heh.


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Re-connected and tightened the upper bracket. All bolts have anti-seize btw.


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Did the same for the bottom bracket underneath the brake duct. This bracket is also a she-devil, but stayed patient and got it to go.


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With all (3) core brackets installed, it was time to tighten the AN fittings on the core. Made sure to place a 27mm backing wrench on this fitting per the instructions.


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Then tightened the top fitting using a 26mm.
Placed a 3mm drill bit to maintain the prescribed clearance between the AN fitting and core, then removed it when done.


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Did the same for the inner side. Wasn’t room for the 27mm combo so used a crescent wrench to back up the lower fitting. Used the same drill bit to maintain the proper gap between the AN fitting and the bracket end attached to the car.


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With the core finally finished, just needed to install the vibration dampener. It’s just a rubber pad that folds around the oil hoses and sandwiches against the metal parts. Zip ties hold it in place. One goes here through this hole.


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Used (2) zip ties to hold it in place. One installed from underneath.


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And the other from the oil cooler side.


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Reinstalled the wheel well plastics and painted the punch plate black.


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Looks better. Maybe a gray color would stand out less.


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HKS oil cooler installed!!! Definitely the most challenging bolt-on mod I’ve done so far...Glad it’s over. *whew* Was fun and learned a few things along the way. Took way longer than anticipated due to having to order tools and parts to address a couple things not mentioned in the instructions. Snapping photos also increases the time it takes, but hopefully my experience will help someone who reads this and adds an oil cooler.

All that’s left is to add oil, check for leaks and re-install the front bumper.

Car normally takes 5.7 quarts but more will be needed with the extra volume due to the cooler. Added (6) quarts last night and the level went high. Will drain back down to 5.7, run the engine so the oil fills the cooler, stop and top it off.

While the bumper is still off, will attempt the Koyorad Radiator install...so figure another couple weeks before the R is back on the road, lol.
 
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Topsportsman916

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Tom, excellent write up. You should write instruction manuals for a living !
Nutserts are a great thing !!! I bought a Nutsert tool about 30 years ago. It's one of those tools when you need it, nothing can take its place. Mine is the pistol grip style. Money well spent.

What made you go with the HKS over a Mishimoto or others?
 
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fatherpain

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Thank you Chris for the sentiment, heh. Really appreciate positive feedback to these bandwidth hogging photobomb postings, lol.

Having gone through the install once, it would go much, much quicker if ever had to install another. But the same can be said for just about any mod, heh.

Hopefully this will save time and energy if someone else attempts this mod or opts for another brand.

Jumped on the HKS when it popped up on the forum a little while back. Some of the HKS stuff have long wait times and didn’t want to find out if this was true for their oil coolers also, heh.


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The Mishimoto oil cooler also looks like a quality kit and its’ radiator core is quite abit larger, so am interested whether it out performs the HKS. However it doesn’t have the full air ducting and deletes the left brake duct, which potentially could be a negative. To make full use, the fake vent duct likely would need more cutting to get enough air flow, which is no big deal.

The Mishimoto install looks much easier and there is an official install video on YouTube so that is a huge plus and it’s also about $350 less :)
 
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fatherpain

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  • #134
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Thank you navindrair, yes I still have that old 95 Accord.... Been driving it while the Type R has been offline for upgrades and my appreciation for it has been rekindled. A dependable 2nd car is a nice luxury when mods don’t go as planned and the car sits, lol.

There’s a good chance the Accord will be driven more during the week as it’s much cheaper to drive and I’ll save some commuter miles on the R.
The Accord’s engine still feels strong at 353K and bet it could hit 500k+ no problem, which is a testament to how great Honda made their cars back then. May take an interest in restoring it once I run out of things to do with the Type R ;)

The HKS oil cooler looks like it is a really well designed kit, despite my grumbling on the install, heh. Overkill for daily driving, so that provides an incentive to get out to the track and push the car.

love the build! Hope you kept that old accord though. Those things were so cool back in the day. Great daily driver to have now. I really like the oil cooler. I have a weird oil cooler fetish lol. I'm running a setrab oil cooler, setrab lines and setrab thermostate with a subaru brz oil plate spacer LOL.
 
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fatherpain

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Woke yesterday morning around 2am for some ungodly reason and willed myself out of bed at 3am. Was wide awake so crept down to the garage to tidy up and begin the Koyorad radiator install. It’s a bit puzzling there aren’t instructions or anything official posted online :(

Thankfully Pro Car Studio posted this nice video for the Civic Si. Noticed right away the Type R is a little different but the concepts are similar:

Status at start of install:

Front bumper, oil tray, air intake and ECU are removed. Car raised. All these conditions are needed for the radiator replacement.


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Pulled off the plastic under liner and set aside. Several push clips needed to be removed and off it came.


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The video calls for both of these bolts to be removed so a cross bracket can be taken off. One is a 14mm socket and the other a 17mm. As mentioned previously the Type R components are different than what’s in the video so I am not convinced the 17mms really need to come off. Without Type R specific instructions, will figure it out along the way. **update the 17mm bolt head with ? is not needed to remove**


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These bolts are somewhat long. The 14mm stayed on the bracket when loose. **update the 17mm bolt head with ? is not needed to remove**


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Lower cross brace removed.


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Believe this is the engine coolant temperature sensor. Disconnected it by pressing the tab and pulling. The white zip tie also needed to be removed.


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Engine oil temperature sensor unplugged. It is difficult to reach, so will remove the sensor after the radiator is pulled, then install to the Koyo.


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Tried pulling the zip tie clip, but was impossible due to its location. Made life easy and cut it, then with the sensor line out of its way pulled the remnants of the clip using a needle nose.


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Will re-use this by trimming the old tie and inserting a new zip tie when it’s time to reinstall ;)


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Opened the coolant expansion tank cap to permit the radiator to drain properly. There is no cap on the radiator itself and the stock tank is plastic.


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Opened this plastic plug on the driver’s side and drained the radiator coolant. After a little while, pulled the plug off completely and left it draining...
 
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