Summer ending- temperatures dropping - tire pressures getting lower

  1. OP
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    SCOPESYS

    SCOPESYS Senior Member

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    Got the same identical system installed on the 2018 si and the 1987 Maxima, for over a year now. (Maxima 2+ years)
    Neither have any issue with the sensors leaking on the Valves, despite having removed them a few times to change Pressures between summer & winter.

    And if they did leak, you would get a warning to tell you exactly which one was leaking, as opposed to an Idiot Light, that "something is wrong -- take it to the Dealer (with your check-book)"
     
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  2. Boosted1one

    Boosted1one Senior Member

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    #17 Boosted1one, Oct 3, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019
    No Costco membership card needed for this tire fill up?

    If so, this is very helpful info!

    Thanks!
     
  3. TabsAZ

    TabsAZ Senior Member

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    This is wrong actually - nitrogen is still a gas that obeys the standard physical laws. Reducing temperature always reduces pressure with the other variables held constant. PV = nRT. What pure nitrogen does is reduce losses due to the n term of the equation (the amount of gas in the tire) because N2 is a larger molecule than O2, which stops it from escaping through the tire wall as easily as O2 does.
     
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  4. Rickmeister 48

    Rickmeister 48 Senior Member

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    Actually just read about this in consumer reports. They said that while nitrogen did pass through the sidewall at a slower rate,it wasn't that much slower. They said they did these tests over a year.
    So I don't know if it cost more money for nitrogen if you do have to pay for it, but they said it really wasn't worth it.
     
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  5. Gruber

    Gruber Senior Member

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    #20 Gruber, Oct 22, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
    For the tires the difference between almost 80% nitrogen and 100% nitrogen is none for all practical purposes.

    The only real difference (and it's still not very important for normal driving) is the moisture. The water inside tires will keep condensing and evaporating again, causing an additional pressure fluctuation with temperature changes, relative to dry gas.

    Dry air would be as good as nitrogen, but there is not much difference between the price of compressed dry air and nitrogen. So the obvious choice is to go with nitrogen, not dry air. It also is more convincing to car owners because of the additional talking point about the aggressive nature of oxygen.

    Everyone who uses an air compressor with a tank should know how much water can accumulate in the tank if it's not regularly drained. And the manufacturers recommend draining after every use to minimize corrosion of the steel tank. Can water and air in the tires cause some corrosion of the rims? Possibly, if they are steel rims with damaged paint. But rims falling apart from internal corrosion has not been a major problem over the history of automobiles.
     
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  6. Fountainhead

    Fountainhead Senior Member

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    I use 78% Nitrogen in my tires.....Check them every 1000 miles or so, they leak down about 4 lbs on each vehicle, a CTR and a Santa Fe.
    Most folks drive around with low tires, low oil, and don't care. Good for the economy when they have to buy cars and tires more often.
     
  7. David Harper

    David Harper Senior Member

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    I read that the way the TPM works is it senses the rotational speed of the wheels. If one wheel is turning at a different rate than the others then that's why the warning light goes on. It doesn't know what the pressures are. So if all four tires lose pressure equally due to colder temps the system won't sense anything.
     
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  8. Gruber

    Gruber Senior Member

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    No, the second generation indirect TPMS will work even if all tires are equally deflated, which may happen because of a significant temperature change.
    You can prove it to yourself experimentally by deflating all tires equally and seeing the TPMS light come on after some driving.
     
  9. elmer255

    elmer255 Senior Member

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    I get the nitrogen in my tires from the good Lord. Seeing as how the air we breath is 78.09% nitrogen, I go with that and the $20 12v air compressor I keep in the trunk of my ‘18 Hatch Sport. To each his own but I could never deal with relying on having to take my car somewhere to have something that is so simple as putting air in the tires done.
     
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  10. BarracksSi

    BarracksSi Senior Member

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    Cool, I go with a mix of 78% N/21% O/0.1% Ar/0.04% CO2/0.0x% other.

    Then I swing by the free air pump at the gas station on base roughly two or three times a year, or when I swap wheels, or if I've been eyeballing the tires and one looks different from the others. Or maybe I'll use the 12V compressor I normally keep in the basement. Super convenient. Same procedure as when I used to autocross, too, although some of the hardcore racers brought their own bubbles for faster fill-ups.
     
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  11. tobylester

    tobylester New Member

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    My son and I took a road trip this past weekend in a 2019 hatchback that we bought new in July. It’s been colder for a couple weeks. The display showed low air pressure. One tire had 14 pounds and the other three tires had approximately 22-25 pounds each. I’ll make sure to check the pressure every few weeks after that experience.
     
  12. BarracksSi

    BarracksSi Senior Member

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    Something's wrong. Check the valve core of that tire and make sure it's fully seated. It shouldn't be ten psi lower than the others.
     
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