Man... these pads look like they'd of lasted another 5 years.

  1. charleswrivers

    charleswrivers Senior Member

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    I was out changing the rotors and pads on the Odyssey. I did the rears a couple days ago and those pads we're about 2/3 worn. The fronts are probably only 1/2 worn. Not bad after over 5 years and right at 70,000 miles I suppose, considering what a heavy bastard it is. I'm hoping these Akebonos on these new rotors are smooth and stop a bit better.
    My wife is enjoying trying to sell herself all over town at the local auto parts stores to find new a new rotor retaining screw after I wrecked one a few minutes ago. I'm just sitting here waiting... hoping... waiting the rain clouds roll in...IMG_20190227_162557663.jpg IMG_20190227_165021115_HDR.jpg
    (sigh) FML...
     
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  2. bluehatch17

    bluehatch17 Senior Member

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    You don’t need the screw. You mount the wheel with the lugnut and the caliper is on properly. The rotor isn’t going anywhere...
     
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  3. OP
    charleswrivers

    charleswrivers Senior Member

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    Yeah... I just wanted to put one back on. It's all back together. I'm just contemplating doing the other side with it sprinkling. Seeing as how I have 3 other vehicles that my wife and I can drive... I think it may be beer-thirty.
     
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  4. REBELXSi

    REBELXSi Señor Member

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    Those pads are still good lol

    Did you replace them because you needed new rotors? Were you getting the dreaded pulsing brakes?
     
  5. OP
    charleswrivers

    charleswrivers Senior Member

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    #5 charleswrivers, Mar 17, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019
    Well... I was. I had gotten new rotors and some new Akebono pads that were supposed to be a bit better than OEM. I figured anything to make that heavy bastard stop better was worth chucking the used pads early. I kept the old rotors as they have a minimal groove worn in them to get them turned by one of my friends that has a lathe setup to do rotors. If I get some pedal pulsing again, I'll just swap the rotors and touch the pads with some light sandpaper to roughen them... bed them... and keep going.

    I'd not ever really checked torque on wheels until the last few wheels and I'm pretty sure the shop down the road I took it to for alignments probably torqued them off and that's what got the rotors. I can't imagine it's ever been driven in such a way to have them warp from heat.

    I just replaced the rear shocks last week and will probably do the struts this summer. I'm still up doing Calc 2 homework... so... yeah. Time is precious... but I wanted to get the van's ride a bit better and make the brakes stop better and smooth. As it is, it stops at least as good as it was new... and I think maybe a smidge better.
     
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  6. mike_si_29

    mike_si_29 Member

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    Nice yard. Where is the grill lol? :hmm::dunno::thumbsup:
     
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  7. Hollywoo0220

    Hollywoo0220 Customer Service oriented (most of the time) :-)

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    @charleswrivers
    Best application would be using Metallic pads and DOT4. Those will bite harder; downfall is increased rotor wear, noise and heat. It’s a trade off....
    Second would be braded lines. That will also provide a bit more braking force when using Ceramic/Organic pads (OE).
     
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  8. OP
    charleswrivers

    charleswrivers Senior Member

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    All true. I like the gradual bite that makes for a smooth daily. As to metallics and DOT 4... I do see DOT 4 being advantageous over 3 pretty much always. I'm at 5 years now... and brake fluid has never popped on the MM and no matter what, it's being done this year. The metallics would do all those things are for a big van who's brakes can easily provide enough force to cause the ABS to engage to prevent the wheels from locking, I'm sticking with the ceramics for quiet braking with less dust. Again, I'm actually happy with less initial bite that are very linear. I can just touch the brakes and get the slightest bit of bite, no pulsing at all and it's smooth. Brakes that are very on-off from bite have their place, but I'd prefer it not to be on the family van. If I stand on them, they do the job.

    I did the rear shocks because they were very cheap and easy to do on these right after the brakes to see it they helped hold the van's trim a little better, amongst other benefits, during braking. They did... amongst other improvements. I'll get to the struts this year at some point, those just will take a bit more time/effort. The rear shocks top mount didn't even go into the interior. It just bolts to the side of the wheel well and was about a 30 min job to do both sides. I bought a ratcheting adapter for use on a breaker bar some years back for some of navy stuff... so I can always get the perfect spot when using it, even with using a 6-star socket, without having to use a torque wrench that could maybe don't he job but is shorter and I hate using them to loosen things. I also got one of those brushless DeWalt impact wrench's that'll break upwards of 1000 ft-lbs allegedly (it's really more like 300-500) so no air to wait on/hoses to run. It's made any work involving breaking bolts loose very quick and has spoiled me.

    That DeWalt is just about the perfect thing for a junkyard. You can start ripping a car apart w/max speed and minimal effort. Add a universal and a few long extensions and there's almost no need to switch to a ratchet.
     
  9. Hollywoo0220

    Hollywoo0220 Customer Service oriented (most of the time) :-)

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    @charleswrivers
    I completely understand
    If you replaced the brake fluid every 2-3yrs and clean/lube the slider pins you would also maintain optimum braking....by the look of your pads though, the wear was pretty even so they were yet in pretty good shape.
    Way to take care of the lady and the bambinos
     
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  10. OP
    charleswrivers

    charleswrivers Senior Member

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    It's on the back patio, next to the little propane smoker.

    That's just the driveway on the side. :thumbsup:

    Thanks. Yep... Slide pin... 'holes' were thoroughly cleaned and I regreased them. I kind of thought the MM would eventually pop for the brake fluid but it never has. I bought it new 5 years ago this past November so... MM or not, it's also on my list of things to do once I get a bit more time on my hands. I never tow and I live in flat SE GA... so I don't do anything that'd boil out the fluid... but I definitely don't want it corroding in their either. 5 years if probably about 2 years too long but... we can't be perfect. I think, per paper books, it's supposed to be ever 3.

    I have a bunch of DI water and coolant sitting in the garage... thinking coolant was going to pop around ~60k... but never did. Another thing I'll probably do this summer. I don't want to tackle the timing belt at ~105k. I've done the chains on little motors and set the timing on a friends car after I helped him replace his head when he bent his valves all up. I figure that's 2-3 years out. I've seen a some random internet coupons for some Honda places to do the belt and water pump for $599... I just need to see if there's a place around me that'll honor it. That'd be the first preventative maintenance item I'd of taken it back to Honda for... and I wouldn't mind paying for the convenience of having someone else do it... plus if it was to go badly shortly after it's done for some reason... I could go after them to effect a repair.

    Those J35s are a pretty decent motor. They're not much for pulling anything with IMO, not that the van's suspension or transmission is that up to the task... but they are very efficient at highway speeds considering the size/weight of the vehicle. I can crack 30 mpgs if I keep it under 60-65 mph and the van never feels underpowered even with all the seats filled. Would have preferred a timing chain and would have been fine if it had made things a smidge louder but... I knew what I was getting into when I bought it and knew I'd be out $500-1000 every 7-8 years if I wanted to keep it running.
     
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  11. Civics4Ever

    Civics4Ever Rally Red EXT

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    I checked the front pads on my 16 EXT and at 58,000 miles they didn't even look half worn. Never have I had pads that lasted as long.
     
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    charleswrivers

    charleswrivers Senior Member

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    The stock Honda pads on that Odyssey definitely wear like iron. I could have likely hit 125-150k before I hit the squealers. I though about keeping them but I figured I'd already bought the other pads and was hoping maybe they would brake slightly better.
     
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  13. civicdabest-foo

    civicdabest-foo Senior Member

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    Those pads look like they came out of a sealed box lol
     
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