I just signed a new lease on a new Civic hatchback Sport Touring.

Honda90210

Member
I recently signed a new lease on a 2020 Civic hatchback Sport Touring. I've posted in other forums and usually get trolled by other car buffs, especially BMW snobs who like to brag about how they got into a more expensive car for a lesser rate when in reality their leasing or financing a loaner or older model.
I feel like I got a fair deal in my region to lease a new car.
Included is oil & tire, anti theft.

2020 Honda Civic Hatchback Sport Touring Hatchback Auto
MSRP: $29780
Monthly Payment: $405
Drive-Off Amount: $405
0 Down
Months:36
Annual Mileage:12,500

Is this a decent deal?

nked82616224_10157068448496925_1966964415907495936_n_li_68677a1d1c013abf0021bfea1837f6ba305af586.jpg
 

MorrisGray

Senior Member
I can't personally own a red car but yours looks really nice in the pictures! What mpg are you getting and do you run regular or premium grade gas?
....Also, does your car have a temporary spare tire?
 

jayy_swish

Senior Member
I can't personally own a red car but yours looks really nice in the pictures! What mpg are you getting and do you run regular or premium grade gas?
....Also, does your car have a temporary spare tire?
These cars were engineered to run on 87 octane anything other than that your pretty much wasting your money for an extra 1-3 mpg more (potentially not always guaranteed), in my opinion. The only cars that are designed for premium fuel is the Si and Type R, or any of them that are tuned. Straight out the dealer they have 87 octane in them
 

MorrisGray

Senior Member
These cars were engineered to run on 87 octane anything other than that your pretty much wasting your money for an extra 1-3 mpg more (potentially not always guaranteed), in my opinion. The only cars that are designed for premium fuel is the Si and Type R, or any of them that are tuned. Straight out the dealer they have 87 octane in them
... I want a car that can run on regular but I find it somewhat strange that Honda website states that Regular Unleaded is the "required" fuel but (Premium Recommended)

https://automobiles.honda.com/civic-hatchback/specs-features-trim-comparison
 

jayy_swish

Senior Member
... I want a car that can run on regular but I find it somewhat strange that Honda website states that Regular Unleaded is the "required" fuel but (Premium Recommended)

https://automobiles.honda.com/civic-hatchback/specs-features-trim-comparison
They’ve been recommending premium fuel for the longest. I feel like all car manufacturers say premium fuel recommended now a days. These cars can run premium, but why put premium in a car that recommends and not requires it (but then again it’s your car so personal choice is up to the owner). Your car won’t fully optimize premium unless it’s a Si, Type R, or tuned. Other than that premium in a “regular required” car you’ll only see a small marginal benefit. The reason the Si requires premium is because it’s tuned slightly more aggressively than the other civic models from the factory so because of that premium is required to avoid pre-ignition and knock in the cylinder. When someone buys an Si you know your paying for performance so premium fuel is the obvious decision, where as the other civic models are designed more for the average car consumer and to keep the cost of ownership down they require regular fuel
 

MorrisGray

Senior Member
<> jayy_swish <> I totally agree with what you said and appreciate your input. I had read somewhere that premium gas may come to an end in our near future. True or not, I don't know. Even though running premium in a Civic may not actually costs a lot more per fill up or 12k miles yearly, I still like just paying for regular grade much better. In my area regular is around $2.00/gal vs premium @ $2.50/gal

@32 mpg/384 miles x 12 gal/$2.00 = $24.00
(or @37 mpg/444 miles) vs premium at $2.50/gal = $30.00
so approx. $6.00 more per tank based on 12 gal fill up
or approx. $187.50 more per year @ 32 mpg based on 12k miles / 375 gals
<> and $162.00 more per year @ 37 mpg based on 12k miles / 324 gals
 

jayy_swish

Senior Member
<> jayy_swish <> I totally agree with what you said and appreciate your input. I had read somewhere that premium gas may come to an end in our near future. True or not, I don't know. Even though running premium in a Civic may not actually costs a lot more per fill up or 12k miles yearly, I still like just paying for regular grade much better. In my area regular is around $2.00/gal vs premium @ $2.50/gal

@32 mpg/384 miles x 12 gal/$2.00 = $24.00
(or @37 mpg/444 miles) vs premium at $2.50/gal = $30.00
so approx. $6.00 more per tank based on 12 gal fill up
or approx. $187.50 more per year @ 32 mpg based on 12k miles / 375 gals
<> and $162.00 more per year @ 37 mpg based on 12k miles / 324 gals
Sadly I wish gas prices were that low in CA. In Los Angeles County the gas prices on avg. right now are...
Regular: $3.15-3.20
Premium: $3.49-3.69
E85: $2.59-2.89
 

adc3132

@sheesh_and_destroy
<> jayy_swish <> I totally agree with what you said and appreciate your input. I had read somewhere that premium gas may come to an end in our near future. True or not, I don't know. Even though running premium in a Civic may not actually costs a lot more per fill up or 12k miles yearly, I still like just paying for regular grade much better. In my area regular is around $2.00/gal vs premium @ $2.50/gal

@32 mpg/384 miles x 12 gal/$2.00 = $24.00
(or @37 mpg/444 miles) vs premium at $2.50/gal = $30.00
so approx. $6.00 more per tank based on 12 gal fill up
or approx. $187.50 more per year @ 32 mpg based on 12k miles / 375 gals
<> and $162.00 more per year @ 37 mpg based on 12k miles / 324 gals
I'll spend the money to put higher quality fuel into my car and clog up my engine with less crap. In the long term it makes a difference in terms of the gunk that accumulates because there are more impurities in a lower grade. I bought this car brand new and plan to put in the highest grade indefinitely.

But it's everyone's choice! To some this down-the-road maintenance may be worth saving the $160ish a year. Given my 20k miles in 6 months, I will spend about $500 more in premium fuel over the whole year. I still think it's worth it.
 

jayy_swish

Senior Member
I'll spend the money to put higher quality fuel into my car and clog up my engine with less crap. In the long term it makes a difference in terms of the gunk that accumulates because there are more impurities in a lower grade. I bought this car brand new and plan to put in the highest grade indefinitely.

But it's everyone's choice! To some this down-the-road maintenance may be worth saving the $160ish a year. Given my 20k miles in 6 months, I will spend about $500 more in premium fuel over the whole year. I still think it's worth it.
A good majority of people that buy civics don’t know much about cars they buy it for the Honda reliability and what not. Of course I agree with you only buy fuel from reputable gas stations 1,000%. But if your at a good gas station the gas quality and additives remains the same minus the octane rating. These cars are GDI meaning they dump fuel directly into the cylinder for combustion so you will not get much carbon build up on valves which leaves to sticky valves and problems. The gunk will still get to the valves though through your PCV system. Which if any of you don’t know, sometimes unburnt gas and oil slip (known as blow by) through the piston rings and are in the crankcase creating a pressure where there shouldn’t be. A car has a PCV system to route that back into the intake to re-burned the blow by in the next combustion cycle of the engine (for emission purposes). The problem with that? That’s the stuff gunking up your engine. So I recommend an oil catch can to filter out that gunk and to keep your valves clean. The reason Honda doesn’t include oil catch cans? Because after 1,000miles or so you have to check the catch can and drain it so it doesn’t overflow and YES you will see oil in it (if you take a sniff you will smell a nasty gas and oil mixture)! So back to the question why Honda doesn’t include it? A few simple reasons.

1. Most people that buy cars don’t know much about cars and don’t always follow up on maintenance on their own. Adding a catch can is another maintenance added that consumers don’t really need because many of them don’t know about it
2. COST! If you look at our PCV system in these vehicles it’s literally a rubber tube. Which is what $0.50 to make? Compared to a catch can (which prices vary depending on what brand you get and the layout of the vehicle) in this case it’s about $30-150...the high end being paying more for name brand than the item itself.

This is a direct injection engine problem, not just Honda so don’t go hating Honda. These are ALL direct injection vehicles. Older vehicles were port injected meaning it squirt the gas in the intake near the valves. The valves would get doused in gas and would clean the gunk right off. Some newer cars have both a directed injection and port injection and would switch between the two to keep the valves from gunking up, but again that’s added cost and to be competitive in a automotive market you have to have a good car that’s reliable and an affordable price for the typical average consumer. Many wouldn’t buy a Civic if the price tag was $30k or $40k, hence why Honda and other manufacturers that compete with Honda near its price range does not implement these changes.
 
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