How long before the Type R is automatic only in the US?

  1. jtamase

    jtamase the.xth

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    This! I don’t know how to drive manual but I totally agree. Driving stick nowadays is more unique and special. I want to learn this skill and experience the fun you have! :)
     
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  2. frtorres87

    frtorres87 Senior Member

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    I've never personally purchased a car that wasn't a manual. With that said I'm
    Pretty sure I'm holding onto my Type R for as long as I can to enjoy that "pure" feeing.
     
  3. gtman

    gtman Senior Member

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    IMO as long as Honda manufactures the Type R it will come with a manual. Plain and simple. Will they ever have an optional automatic? Maybe.
     
  4. noir

    noir New Member

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    #19 noir, May 21, 2019
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
    Europe here :) And yes, this is right. But not only because its cheaper - the old automatic transmissions were crap and had really bad MPG. Nobody bought them - imagine a VW Golf 1 Diesel, 50 hp, 3 speed AT. It was so slow at shifting, it took more than a second to change gears. Friend of mine owned one. This was a really terrible car.

    Perhaps hard to believe for some of you: In the last 20 years I never owned a car with an AT. Heck, I don't even thought about buying one. If you only drive MT for such a long time, you don't even think about shifting. It happens automatically. Even in really worse traffic it is not that much of a problem.

    And yes, cars which get 10 MPG are really expensive here - 1 Liter premium gasoline costs around 1.8€ (which makes ~ 7.63 $ / Gallon) . But nowadays, ATs getting better and better. So yes, more ATs will be sold. In the future, especially hybrid cars will get ATs.

    Which isn't a always a bad thing - look at the NSX. AT + Hybrid can be really good. If the manufacturer wants to.
     
  5. WhatThePuck

    WhatThePuck Senior Member

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    When my previous vehicle was purchased I was given the option of manual or automatic. First question I asked was what the price difference was. Automatic was another $1200. I had already wanted a manual, and learned on that car. I knew after I started driving it that I'd only want manual cars until my legs couldn't do it anymore lol. I test drove a Lancer, it was automatic and I asked if it came in manual. The dealer said no but understood why I wanted it and then told me how automatics are getting better on gas and whatnot and I said I don't care it's not the same. hehe :D purist here for sure. It does seem to be switching now and I wouldn't be surprised if it would be an extra $1200+ to get a manual down the road. makes me sad :(
     
  6. typeaarrr

    typeaarrr Senior Member

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    Next generation. Honda will probably use the Accord auto transmission or use Acura's dual clutch. It doesn't make sense for Honda to produce a limited model of the Civic and restrict the market to only a small segment of car buying market.
     
  7. OceansX

    OceansX Senior Member

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    Wish I had a type r...cept wife cant drive stick and it doesn't come with heated seats or a sunroof...
     
  8. racer

    racer Senior Member

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    Just think, buying a new manual makes you nearly part of the " 1 % " ;)
     
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  9. racer

    racer Senior Member

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    Well, again, cars are global. If there are people buying them elsewhere, it comes down simply to the cost of certification for the US market, assuming they (Honda) think the US market for manual transmission cars is worth pursuing. Once corporate decides that selling 10-20,000 manuals doesn't make sense (as it impacts product planning and dealer willingness) then yes.. maybe they develop a DSG/PDK type box or put in a full slush box.
     
  10. typeaarrr

    typeaarrr Senior Member

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    The biggest car market is the U.S. If Honda puts an automatic transmission in the CTR, your market for potential buyers just open up by 90ish percent.

     
  11. SixxSpeed

    SixxSpeed Senior Member

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    The US might be the biggest car buying market overall, but the US is not the biggest Japanese car market.
     
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  12. SixxSpeed

    SixxSpeed Senior Member

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    What? Why? Developing a new automatic transmission is expensive. Reusing an existing 6MT is not. Honda doesn't have to reinvent a whole new 6MT for every car. All they need to do is change gear ratios inside, and voila. Same basic layout. maybe change the mounting face, and Thats it. The transmission is already developed. And has been since 2002 when the K series engine first emerged.

    I'm not saying a 6MT in a new CTR would be free, but they're also not developing an all new transmission. For what reason?
     
  13. typeaarrr

    typeaarrr Senior Member

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    Read my post again. I said Honda will borrow a transmission from the Accord or use Acura's dual clutch transmission. Where did I say Honda will develop a new transmission?
     
  14. typeaarrr

    typeaarrr Senior Member

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    #29 typeaarrr, May 21, 2019
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
    The U.S is the biggest consumer for Japanese car. The market here is so big that Honda, Toyota, and Nissan has factories here in the U.S. Also, we buy so many cars, that Honda has to produce other Civics from other countries to import to U.S because the factory here can't keep up with the demand.
     
  15. SixxSpeed

    SixxSpeed Senior Member

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    So what you're saying is they'll use the lower rated Accord transmission over an existing and better CTR transmission? What's the difference? Both already exist. I'm assuming you're referring to the 6MT in this case.

    In my previous post I thought you were referring to the 10AT in the Accord (this thread is about the CTR going auto, isn't it?). That would NEVER go into the CTR. I'll bet whatever you like that'll never happen.

    Also, that Acura DCT was not designed to handle CTR power levels. There's a reason it's slapped to a naturally aspirated I4 and nothing else. The DCT attached to the RLX is too big and meant for V6s.

    While it might be able to handle the power load in the real world (the I4 DCT, that is) it likely cuts too deep into Honda's own safety factor values for them to feel comfortable using it on a car designed to be a daily driven track slut.
     
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