FK8 Civic Type R Sway Bar Guide

  1. Type-JZ

    Type-JZ Senior Member

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    Hello,

    I searched and there wasn't a list, so I made this list since I got tired of searching for the same thing. It may help others who are also looking. Please let me know if I need to make any changes.

    Besides the links below, everything else can be sourced from Evasive Motorsports or various online resources. Evasive has a more complete page with most of the products in the link or the pages within it.

    https://www.evasivemotorsports.com/...GY&Store_Code=EM&Category_Code=FK8-SUSPENSION


    OEM:

    Source: http://www.karcepts.com/shop/product.php?id_product=131

    - Front – 29 mm, tubular

    - Rear – 20.5mm, solid, 7.5 lbs, 721 lbs/in

    Karcepts:

    Source: http://www.karcepts.com/shop/product.php?id_product=131

    - Front – XXX

    - Rear - 1.00" O.D. x 0.095" Wall, tubular

    - Rear - 1.00" O.D. x 0.188" Wall, tubular

    Eibach:

    - Front – 32mm, tubular, non-adjustable

    - Rear – 25mm, tubular, 2-pt adjustable

    - Rear – 22mm, tubular, 2-pt adjustable

    Cusco:

    - Front – 30mm, solid, non-adjustable. 131% stiffer

    - Rear – 22mm, solid, non-adjustable. 143% stiffer

    Whiteline:

    - Front – 27mm, solid, 2 pt adjustable

    - Rear – 22mm, solid, 2 pt adjustable

    AFE:

    Source: https://afepower.com/afe-control-440-701001-n-sway-bar-set

    - Front – 32mm, tubular (description says adjustable, but pictures only shows 1 hole)

    - Rear – 25.4mm, tubular, 2 pt adjustable


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    For sway bar rates, you can use the chart from Whiteline as a guide but there are also various online calculators you can use.

    Source: https://www.whiteline.com.au/docs/bulletins/Update BL-281.pdf

    It may be questionable since Cusco claims their bars are stiffer or double the stiffness vs Whiteline's chart for the same size. Theoretically(if similar material and end mounting hole location), Whiteline's 2-way adjustable , stiffest setting should be stiffer than the Cusco's non adjustable bar. Maybe the material they used and the location of the hole produces the stiffer rate? :dunno:
     
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  2. 2018ChampwhiteCTR

    2018ChampwhiteCTR Senior Member

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    Which one to go with and why?

    Isn’t our car already great at cornering. If you aren’t tracking the car do you even need to upgrade?

    I’m only asking because I’m on the fence and these are all a cheap and effective way to mod if it helps increase the joyriding of the car!
     
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  3. zelmo

    zelmo Senior Member

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    Agreed.

    Car already handles great. So for daily driving and occasional canyon runs, which one to get?
     
  4. OP
    Type-JZ

    Type-JZ Senior Member

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    hmmmm, well, i always say this; what everyone needs depends what they "think" they want and what they're wallet allows. Honestly, if you're not doing much, why do anything to this car? Like you said, it's already a great car. Why put an intake? Why exhaust? This beast already makes 300hp and to top it off, the handling is amazing with a Ring record. :dunno:
    That said, to answer your question, I'm not sure which one to get. I'm still debating. I want to figure out why Cusco's numbers are higher. If they're numbers are in fact true, then I would get both of their bars since they're the stiffest without being too stiff. If their numbers are false, then I would still get Cusco's front, but paired w/ Whiteline's rear. Simply because I would get a 30mm front and 23mm rear at the stiffest setting(if i understand Whiteline's chart correctly). Both of them are solid bars, which is consistent vs the stock front hollow and rear solid. Easier to put in calculations. This may not matter and you could mix and match hollow & solid bars to your liking. On the other hand, i may also get the Karcepts bar since there's so much adjustment to that bar. I could set it at the softest setting and go up from there. I'm no expert by any means nor am I a track rat. But, I do like suspension, so i like to play around with it. I'm still doing research and experimenting, so that's why there's nothing on my car. :) Also, personally, I would put on a sway bar, chassis stiffening stuff, and aerodynamic stuff before i put on an intake that makes a whooosh noise. But, that's just me....
     
  5. OP
    Type-JZ

    Type-JZ Senior Member

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    Hey Romy,

    For what you're doing, I'd say don't get one. You'd have to be going very fast to notice a difference anyways. IME on the canyons, I was oversteering w/ slightly bald tires. If you've seen other reviews, lots of people can also attest the car oversteers from the factory. Although, some have said it understeers. I tend to believe my own experience, so if i'm already oversteering, adding just a bigger rear bar alone will make it oversteer even more. You don't want to be drifting off of Angeles Crest or GMR. In the future, if you decide to get a bar, i would get front and rear to balance the car back out. In the end, it all depends on driving style whether you prefer oversteer or understeer.
     
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  6. zelmo

    zelmo Senior Member

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    Thanks for the input, birthday boy. Lol!
     
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  7. OP
    Type-JZ

    Type-JZ Senior Member

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    don't expose me to the world!! :dance::nixon::lol:
     
  8. frtorres87

    frtorres87 Senior Member

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    Anyone have anymore input?
     
  9. breakingakajav

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    Good start, I wish we had a guide for most things (I//E/DP etc) here like how clubrsx/evom etc have on their forums. If users can chime in and help talk about pros, cons, comparisons etc it would be amazing.
     
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  10. frtorres87

    frtorres87 Senior Member

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    i totally agree
     
  11. caspar21

    caspar21 2018 Civic Si

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    karconcepts may be very adjustable but people are reporting it is quite noisy.
     
  12. OP
    Type-JZ

    Type-JZ Senior Member

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    i ended up installing a whiteline rear with the whiteline end links and there's some noise. I believe the more stiff it is, the more clunking you may get. On top of that, it looks like lots of metal to metal contact for the Karcepts designed bar. I saw that AMR is having an option, but not much info out there.
     
  13. bbdave

    bbdave Senior Member

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    I’ve been running the 25mm Eibach rear sway bar. Feels great with 18x9.5 et 45 wheels and 265/35 tires.
     
  14. FK8_Dan

    FK8_Dan Member

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    I’ve been looking at either getting the eibach 25mm rsb or the whiteline 22mm rsb (without adjustable droplinks)

    Does anyone have any insight as to which one is best I.e stiffer?

    I’m currently running swift springs
     
  15. Hayabusa160

    Hayabusa160 Senior Member

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    swaybars are very subjective. some people like the rear more loose then others so its personal preference.
    on my old hatchback i ran a heavy rear spring and a big rear bar for more rotation on a dry track its perfect. but on a wet track it was too loose.
     
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