Blown axle and broken engine mounts. " due to stress of car being low"

  1. nadeesh

    nadeesh Member

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    #1 nadeesh, Sep 12, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018
    Hey fam, new member/mechanical noob. So any kind of feedback and advise will be greatly appreciated.
    Car is bone stock except for d2 coils and some bbs knock off wheels+ some visiual mods.

    Long story short, car has been lowered about 3" on all corners on d2 coils for 3 months and daily driven. Right after the install there were a couple of clicking noises but i ignored those as they come and go. (assumed new coils were just settling in) However, in about a month, started hearing these funky clicking noises when shifting (cvt trans) and driving around in general. Finally took it to the dealer to diagnose last week(car is still under warranty) and they initially discovered two broken engine mounts and refused to inspect car further due "it being too low to fit on their lift."
    Then I took it to a friend of mine who owns a body shop, he happens to have mechanical knowledge also. And he did discover two mounts that were bad plus the passenger side axle blown at the bearing. he claimed "This is possible due to the stress of car being lowered+hard riding suspension." Now I trust this guy because he is good friend and always does free labor for me. So there is nothing for him to gain from lying to me.

    Now I will accept my part of wrong doing for not doing all my research on lowering the car and setting up coils properly for street use. I am just finding out that mid to extreme lowering causes axle to sit at an awkward angle. Also I changed my driving style but to be honest I've been hitting bumps pretty hard on the freeway. (especially those nasty bumps on the 405, for those who know)

    Here are some questions and advise that I am looking for from you guys,

    1. So according my mechanic even if once I replace my broken parts, there's a good chance of it happening again. he said best thing I can do is raise the car and make suspension as soft as possible. Now I dont mind suspension being soft and i actually adjusted my dampening to 0 (softest possible) on all corners. I was riding at 16 all corners before (0 being softest and 32 to being hardest on d2 coils) But I do not want to raise my car because that defeats the whole purpose of having coils, might as well go back to stock. And to me personally my drop isn't even that aggressive. So are 10th gen civics (non SI, non TypeR) inherently bad at being lowered or does pretty much any car that has being lowered goes thru unfortunate situations like this?

    2. What can I further do to my suspension (I don't really want to raise my car) to make it soft as possible. I have not messed with the preload. It is at what d2 set it up to be. Are there any additional parts that I can use to take the stress off the axles and mounts. Will an alignment help?

    3. Any feedback on d2 coils? are they too hard for street use? what can i do to make them as soft as possible.
     
  2. Shankmeyster

    Shankmeyster Senior Member

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    If you don't adjust your axles when you install any lowering, they are going to tear the boots or cause axle problems, from what I have read. How the heck are you lowered 3 inches? I'm at 1 inch down and I scrape on speed bumps. Also, yes, being lowered will cause axle and suspension problems at some point as you are changing the geometry of a car that was designed to be a certain ride height from the factory. Don't know why it would cause issues with the motor mounts, but I'm not that low.
     
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  3. OP
    OP
    nadeesh

    nadeesh Member

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    I have to extreme angle driveways and some speed bumps but other than that it clears everything that shitty roads in los angles has to offer lol. BTW what do you exactly mean "by adjust your axles"?
     
  4. Shankmeyster

    Shankmeyster Senior Member

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    It was said in one of the threads that you had to unbolt them from the hubs when you lowered so that they would have more play when you bolted everything back up. Don't know if this is correct but it seemed to work for some as not everyone has had torn boots, myself included.
     
  5. Hondanickx

    Hondanickx Senior Member

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    Roll center adjusters will correct the suspension geometry and keep the axles from binding or destroying themselfs.
    Hardrace has them or you could simply make them yourself.They just use spacers and longer bolts between the lower ball joint mount.
    http://www.hardrace.com/Product_detail.asp?id=3514

    The engine mounts problem would most likely be because the general civic uses liquid filled engine mounts and those can't handle that much abuse.Upgrading to SI or aftermarket engine mounts could solve that.
     
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  6. L8apex

    L8apex Senior Member

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    Not exactly. The roll center adjuster will lower the angle of the lower control arm to something resembling factory geometry but it does nothing for the angle of the axle. The transmission is still at the same height off the ground, and the outer cv joint is still the sane height off the ground so the axle angle is the same.

    IF the axle was hitting the control arm during suspension compression, THEN using the roll center kit to lower the angle of the arm away from the axle may help.
     
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  7. Hondanickx

    Hondanickx Senior Member

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    You're right , i was thinking The axle also moved up with The control arm.
     
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