What did you do to your Type R today?

CaptClutch

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Where did you order the tow hook and tug shaft from? Raceseng Web site has been "Out of Stock" of the red ones for a long while. May I inquire as to how much you paid for the whole tow hook kit? Thanks
It was out of stock back when I ordered on May 3rd and it just got here yesterday July 3rd. It was $285 for the tug shaft and tow ring direct from Raceseng



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fatherpain

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Wanted to replace the (2) studs that are threaded into the turbo housing with Rampage ti hardware as part of the downpipe install.... attempted to remove the top one and ran into problems.


f0d812b2-2c4b-4b52-80d5-bd54d80e0f17-jpeg.jpg

Used my handy dandy heating/cooling/kroil technique and the stud initially moved and backed out several turns. Then it got really hard. Tried heating and cooling several times and couldn’t get it. Would have snapped if applied any more pressure....

Gave up and attempted to remove the nuts, but the inner nut would not come off. :doh:


46a91b6a-cda7-4cd8-801b-fa2dc56ed0ec-jpeg.jpg

Used a grinder and cut off wheel and carefully chopped up the nut In several places, without touching the stud, so it could be safely removed.


cd471fb7-f7f9-4272-86b2-7f2501c6bd43-jpeg.jpg

Just went deep enough to see the threads then stopped.


5a0a9cb5-85a3-4a1f-8b1f-aa4e7b2fcc83-jpeg.jpg

And made several cuts to weaken the nut. Used a large flathead screwdriver to pry the nut fragments apart.


c03ea3e2-62be-453c-90a0-b24e8e4f6db8-jpeg.jpg

Until all that was left was this.


cf7c6e01-5890-4bc0-a4cc-fbde1f3f737d-jpeg.jpg

Nut successfully removed.


5c696f00-d742-4bc7-959f-f32ab7149333-jpeg.jpg

Fortunately, there enough good threads remaining to reuse the stud. Dunno why it galled so badly. In hindsight, should have applied anti-seize before trying to back the studs out. Ah well.


cb6c7080-0557-4647-a1f6-6b1254e10fb5-png.png

Thought a washer would be needed to provide space to reach the good threads but turned out not needed. Dodged a bullet, 😂

Really want to add the Rampage hardware.... but to do so now, would need to pull the turbo and machine the studs out and dress the threads... on the fence whether it’s worth the trouble.
 
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NapalmEnema

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Wanted to replace the (2) studs that are threaded into the turbo housing with Rampage ti hardware as part of the downpipe install.... attempted to remove the top one and ran into problems.


f0d812b2-2c4b-4b52-80d5-bd54d80e0f17-jpeg.jpg

Used my handy dandy heating/cooling/kroil technique and the stud initially moved and backed out several turns. Then it got really hard. Tried heating and cooling several times and couldn’t get it. Would have snapped if applied any more pressure....

Gave up and attempted to remove the nuts, but the inner nut would not come off. :doh:


46a91b6a-cda7-4cd8-801b-fa2dc56ed0ec-jpeg.jpg

Used a grinder and cut off wheel and carefully chopped up the nut In several places, without touching the stud, so it could be safely removed.


cd471fb7-f7f9-4272-86b2-7f2501c6bd43-jpeg.jpg

Just went deep enough to see the threads then stopped.


5a0a9cb5-85a3-4a1f-8b1f-aa4e7b2fcc83-jpeg.jpg

And made several cuts to weaken the nut. Used a large flathead screwdriver to pry the nut fragments apart.


c03ea3e2-62be-453c-90a0-b24e8e4f6db8-jpeg.jpg

Until all that was left was this.


cf7c6e01-5890-4bc0-a4cc-fbde1f3f737d-jpeg.jpg

Nut successfully removed.


5c696f00-d742-4bc7-959f-f32ab7149333-jpeg.jpg

Fortunately, there enough good threads remaining to reuse the stud. Dunno why it galled so badly. In hindsight, should have applied anti-seize before trying to back the studs out. Ah well.


cb6c7080-0557-4647-a1f6-6b1254e10fb5-png.png

Thought a washer would be needed to provide space to reach the good threads but turned out not needed. Dodged a bullet, 😂

Really want to add the Rampage hardware.... but to do so now, would need to pull the turbo and machine the studs out and dress the threads... on the fence whether it’s worth the trouble.
Wow you just barely saved that lol gj!
 

Volksparts

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Wanted to replace the (2) studs that are threaded into the turbo housing with Rampage ti hardware as part of the downpipe install.... attempted to remove the top one and ran into problems.


f0d812b2-2c4b-4b52-80d5-bd54d80e0f17-jpeg.jpg

Used my handy dandy heating/cooling/kroil technique and the stud initially moved and backed out several turns. Then it got really hard. Tried heating and cooling several times and couldn’t get it. Would have snapped if applied any more pressure....

Gave up and attempted to remove the nuts, but the inner nut would not come off. :doh:


46a91b6a-cda7-4cd8-801b-fa2dc56ed0ec-jpeg.jpg

Used a grinder and cut off wheel and carefully chopped up the nut In several places, without touching the stud, so it could be safely removed.


cd471fb7-f7f9-4272-86b2-7f2501c6bd43-jpeg.jpg

Just went deep enough to see the threads then stopped.


5a0a9cb5-85a3-4a1f-8b1f-aa4e7b2fcc83-jpeg.jpg

And made several cuts to weaken the nut. Used a large flathead screwdriver to pry the nut fragments apart.


c03ea3e2-62be-453c-90a0-b24e8e4f6db8-jpeg.jpg

Until all that was left was this.


cf7c6e01-5890-4bc0-a4cc-fbde1f3f737d-jpeg.jpg

Nut successfully removed.


5c696f00-d742-4bc7-959f-f32ab7149333-jpeg.jpg

Fortunately, there enough good threads remaining to reuse the stud. Dunno why it galled so badly. In hindsight, should have applied anti-seize before trying to back the studs out. Ah well.


cb6c7080-0557-4647-a1f6-6b1254e10fb5-png.png

Thought a washer would be needed to provide space to reach the good threads but turned out not needed. Dodged a bullet, 😂

Really want to add the Rampage hardware.... but to do so now, would need to pull the turbo and machine the studs out and dress the threads... on the fence whether it’s worth the trouble.
Have you ever used a stud removal tool? I was successful with this tool in the past while building engines. Just a recommendation.

Screenshot_20200704-213804_Chrome.jpg
 

RepyT

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APR and ASR are two different companies. ASR makes the handmade custom scoops. APR makes the performance oriented parts. The one Omar posted about is carbon fiber also and sits higher allowing more in. I also have one on order and they should be arriving soon per APR.
I owe so much I think I got APR and ASR mixed up.

APR one sounds interesting but I’ve observed something I find interesting as a tech geek wannabe in a couple areas, one is aerodynamics, the other engineering. I’ve played an engineer on TV before and can tell you that steam whistle is really loud!

The other amusing aspect is that when we here talk horsepower, we demand that anything except dynamometer graphs as a subjective opinion, aka butt dyno, unproven wishful thinking based on supposedly calibrated gluteals (I’m guilty), Some of us it’s Maximus, Scrawnyus,, or OMG run before it eats you.

Anyway, if we’re talking aerodynamics there’s no talk of truly measured technical improvement aka scientific proof. I’m not judging yet I know the R body, even panels didn’t just happen without CAD modeling and extensive aero refinement. 2020 tweaks show some were spot on with all sorts of mods, not all though (wait for 2021/22 w/possibly more).

Where was I? Oh, so we aero-amateurs come along and decide based on gosh knows what (NASCAR, Formula 1, a childhood on a dirt track, or some form of inherited 7th sense there are practical actual advantage other than looks).

Without hesitation we tell each other how to improve aerodynamcs without anything other than a happy logical acceptance sans proof that justifies the change as an improvement. We don’t have access as consumers to CAD or any modeling facility to give specifics. Certainly nothing supposedly standardized yet fallible like a dyno chart with before (control) and after (test article/variable) like those I deal with often.

There seems to be near blind acceptance of logic that’s says, try this, it got me _____? It seems to do some mods that make sense as it should work, so we go for it. Where’s the ‘aero chart vs ‘aero-butt-namics’? Dunno? Then maybe you’ll cause vibration, oscillatiation, resonance, turbulence downstream. How would you know? Do you care? Does it matter if something gets loose departs, hurts someone? Maybe you’ll go faster or be slower, 5 degrees cooler, as long as it looks cooler too, it must help then, maybe not peeps.

As I’ve said before, at sane speeds that most of us operate in, the impacts and chances of making aero significantly worse or better are small, discovering impact even less so mod on.

What about proof though? How do we without hesitation be dyno centric for one type of mod and never seek benefits when scrutinizing or testing for the other aero mods (that may no no or negligible impact) You don’t know what you don’t know without confirmation.

Do you trust Seibon, APR, any wing maker that much? I do WRT their own products but not necessarily all on a Type R.

Do we have the same faith in each other or ‘eBay engineers’ to know better than a composite team of Honda gurus delicately balancing form and function? Sorry, but for me about aero mods without proof, not so much.

(Disclaimer: YMMV, BNI, no live animals or people were harmed by all this posts hot air.)
 
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Volksparts

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I got my Js Racing grill and Varis fender extensions installed

D697CFBC-2B90-4367-AAC4-4180BF8BE343.jpeg


B5731C75-A576-48FF-B160-538548F50F9A.jpeg


90264613-156A-479F-843A-300E20EB5DEC.jpeg


685BBDFF-E980-4309-BA60-F7887B1130EF.jpeg
That looks super clean. All goes so nice together. I think with white that kit goes super well together. I saw varis fender extensions the other day on a SGP car and it just didn't look right. The light would hit it different than the other panels making it appear different color than the rest. Now white is great because it all matches better.
That grille looks awesome especially with the increased airflow and the appearance of the floating H.
 

frtorres87

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That looks super clean. All goes so nice together. I think with white that kit goes super well together. I saw varis fender extensions the other day on a SGP car and it just didn't look right. The light would hit it different than the other panels making it appear different color than the rest. Now white is great because it all matches better.
That grille looks awesome especially with the increased airflow and the appearance of the floating H.
thank you so much. I’m very happy with the results. Hmmmm, what should I do next???
 

RepyT

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I got my Js Racing grill and Varis fender extensions installed

D697CFBC-2B90-4367-AAC4-4180BF8BE343.jpeg


B5731C75-A576-48FF-B160-538548F50F9A.jpeg


90264613-156A-479F-843A-300E20EB5DEC.jpeg


685BBDFF-E980-4309-BA60-F7887B1130EF.jpeg
Awesome shots, looks great.

The last shot made me chuckle though. You’ve done so many mods that the parts delivery trucks left an oil stain, that’s cool.
 

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Wanted to replace the (2) studs that are threaded into the turbo housing with Rampage ti hardware...
This mirrors my experience almost exactly, up to the point where I kept trying and eventually snapped the stud. I tried every type of exactor available (including the style shown above) and then tried welding a large nut on the end. After breaking a small bit of the stud off with the welded nut and rinsing/repeating about 4 times, we eventually gave up. A local machine shop was able to drill out the remaining stud and re-tap the threads. The threads were damaged pretty badly, but thankfully enough remained that the rampage stud held without issue. Not sure what happens with that stud, but it definitely seemed like it was crossthreaded and I suspect they are over-tightened when installed causing the threads to become deformed.
 

fatherpain

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Yeah it was weird as hell. The stud broke loose easily and was turned smoothly. Backed out several turns... maybe 1/4” worth... then blammo! Full stop. Thought for sure I’d get it so tried heating and cooling several times. Definitely was gonna snap if went any harder. No harm no foul until realizing the nut on the stud closest to turbo galled from all that force applied :doh:


7BECFDC1-DC75-4713-A8FE-324181C2123A.jpeg

This was how far the top stud closest to engine came out then got stuck.


B97E04D3-4861-455D-B85F-F81F02F0179C.jpeg

Was thinking of trying the lower stud today for more punishment.... did you have trouble with that one also?

How bad was it to remove and reinstall the turbo? Any pitfalls or special to be aware of? Or was it machined in place?



This mirrors my experience almost exactly, up to the point where I kept trying and eventually snapped the stud. I tried every type of exactor available (including the style shown above) and then tried welding a large nut on the end. After breaking a small bit of the stud off with the welded nut and rinsing/repeating about 4 times, we eventually gave up. A local machine shop was able to drill out the remaining stud and re-tap the threads. The threads were damaged pretty badly, but thankfully enough remained that the rampage stud held without issue. Not sure what happens with that stud, but it definitely seemed like it was crossthreaded and I suspect they are over-tightened when installed causing the threads to become deformed.
 
Last edited:

Volksparts

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Yeah it was weird as hell. The stud broke loose easily and was turned smoothly. Backed out several turns... maybe 1/4” worth... then blammo! Full stop. Thought for sure I’d get it so tried heating and cooling several times. Definitely was gonna snap if went any harder. No harm no foul until realizing the nut on the stud closest to turbo galled from all that force applied :doh:


7BECFDC1-DC75-4713-A8FE-324181C2123A.jpeg

This was how far the top stud closest to engine came out then got stuck.


B97E04D3-4861-455D-B85F-F81F02F0179C.jpeg

Was thinking of trying the lower stud today for more punishment.... did you have trouble with that one also?

How bad was it to remove and reinstall the turbo? Any pitfalls or special to be aware of? Or was it machined in place?
I'm always a fan of using pb blaster on it first. Too bad the studs weren't facing up so it would soak in better.
 

Nitroturtle

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Yeah it was weird as hell. The stud broke loose easily and was turned smoothly. Backed out several turns... maybe 1/4” worth... then blammo! Full stop. Thought for sure I’d get it so tried heating and cooling several times. Definitely was gonna snap if went any harder. No harm no foul until realizing the nut on the stud closest to turbo galled from all that force applied :doh:


7BECFDC1-DC75-4713-A8FE-324181C2123A.jpeg

This was how far the top stud closest to engine came out then got stuck.


B97E04D3-4861-455D-B85F-F81F02F0179C.jpeg

Was thinking of trying the lower stud today for more punishment.... did you have trouble with that one also?

How bad was it to remove and reinstall the turbo? Any pitfalls or special to be aware of? Or was it machined in place?
I had no issues removing the other stud. I ended up removing the band clamp on the turbo and taking the entire turbine housing to the machine shop. Re-assembly wasn't too bad, except for dealing with the wastegate actuator. While I was able to remove it without removing the actuator arm, it seemed impossible to reinstall with it in place. Once I removed the arm, I was able to get the turbo back together, but then I realized there was some adjustability to the length of the arm and freaked out a bit when I was unable to get it to match up with the way it was. In my case, the arm seemed too short and I was only able to barely thread the nut flush with the end of the actuator rod, when initially it had about 3 threads sticking out. I left it with tension for a few days and actually inspected a local stock CTR to verify the position. It seemed like after sitting it loosened up a bit and when I went to install everything I was able to lightly turn the adjustment nut in further and eventually line up with the original spacing. The nut on the end along with the metal bell-housing part (also threaded on the actuator arm) over the end of the actuator form a captive connection to allow adjustability. My understanding from when I researched is that it can throw a code if this is too far out of spec, but it does seem to do a calibration of some sorts when starting the car. My advise would be to inspect the wastegate arm connection carefully and observe what happens when the ignition is turned on, before removing the turbine housing. It was definitely a bit tricky to get back together, but now it's together and I haven't had a single issue. Good luck, I know I was very stressed out going through the process but in the end everything turned out fine.

I'm probably doing a poor job of explaining, but hopefully you can make some sense of it by looking at the actuator arm connection. As I mentioned, I didn't even realize this could be adjusted until after I had taken it apart (I wasn't in the best mood after having just snapped the stud). Let me know if you have more questions and I'd be happy to help with more details.
 

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I did my first two mods today...well Friday July 3rd I got a ceramic coat applied that lasts a year+ a buddy of mine did it outside on the low low. We worked together on it. Today I did a K & N filter replacement and wheel locks for added security. More little mods to come !!!
 

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