PRL Motorsports 2017+ Honda Civic Type-R FK8 Turbocharger Inlet Pipe Kit

AdamD19DFK8

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That was an actual issue on their end? I got my HVI from the first batch, and when installing it, the silicone hose just never goes on as far as I see everyone else's. I've done everything I can, and even extra muscle to help me push it onto the inlet pipe, but still nothing. Did a couple other tries since I had to remove that piping when I installed their charge pipes, and I still haven't been able to slide that silicone over as far as most peoples. Figured it must be me. Tried lubing it as well. Would be nice if I got another one for free. Maybe it'll fit better whenever I get the inlet by PRL. I have all their products but that.
The TIP inlet hose is better, easier to install, but you still need to pay close attention to how the evap flange is positioned as it can easily rub against the hood


To test if it would hit, instead of trying to peak through the hood and look, I took a piece of painters tape and made a loop and gently placed it on top of the flange. Then I dropped the hood, if it was positioned improperly it would stick to the hood. Adjusted the flange until I could drop the hood repeatedly without the tape sticking to it.

For mine I had to set it up like this


The diamond shaped base is what would be rubbing the hood



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jayevo23

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Not sure if this was already posted somewhere in this thread, but is anyone running the eventuri intake with this inlet pipe?
 

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The TIP inlet hose is better, easier to install, but you still need to pay close attention to how the evap flange is positioned as it can easily rub against the hood


To test if it would hit, instead of trying to peak through the hood and look, I took a piece of painters tape and made a loop and gently placed it on top of the flange. Then I dropped the hood, if it was positioned improperly it would stick to the hood. Adjusted the flange until I could drop the hood repeatedly without the tape sticking to it.

For mine I had to set it up like this


The diamond shaped base is what would be rubbing the hood
I don't have an issue with the evap nozzle. Just the silicone not sliding all the way. I might be fine. Been on like this for about 10 months now
 

AdamD19DFK8

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I don't have an issue with the evap nozzle. Just the silicone not sliding all the way. I might be fine. Been on like this for about 10 months now
Ah my bad. I ordered the hvi and inlet at the same time but I received the HVI first so I threw it on. The hose it came with meant for the stock inlet did seem a little short, but I got it to work ok. I had the feeling of "I personally wish more hose was on the inlet and maf housing. Getting the hose on both ends was a giant PITA. Once I got both sides on, I snugged down the hose clamps and then fully bolted down the intake box. Then I loosened the clamps to work at the hose to try and get both ends to have an equal amount of material around their respective places. I needed to make sure that enough of the hose was on an area at least slightly larger than the width of the metal hose clamp. I only had the HVI on the stock inlet for a day or two before I got my inlet pipe.

I can definitely say that the hose that comes with the titanium inlet pipe fits on both ends enough to not question as to wether or not there's enough.
 

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This may have been asked on this thread already but I checked a ton of pages and no luck.

PRL says a tune is recommended once this is installed. Is there a long term negative impact if I install this without a tune? Would it be useless?
 

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A tune is recommended to take advantage of the extra power you can make with the intake. If you do not tune it, power gains are minimal, but it won't damage the engine.
 

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This may have been asked on this thread already but I checked a ton of pages and no luck.

PRL says a tune is recommended once this is installed. Is there a long term negative impact if I install this without a tune? Would it be useless?
The only parts that need a tune to be run safely are:
  1. Fuel system upgrades
  2. Different sized injectors, turbocharger, or cams
You still want a tune, but could run on factory for:
  1. Catless downpipe (to cancel the errors from not having a cat) or high flow cat
  2. Intakes that modify the volume of air passing over the MAF sensor (currently only the Eventuri)
Our ECU compensates just fine for the differences in most of these intakes, as well as most other bolt-on parts, so it's safe.

FYI, intake parts for the most part don't really do all that much on our cars except allow additional airflow you can't make much use of until you've installed an upgraded turbo or fuel system. Many of them only reduce power. There isn't really much tuning to be done for them.

That being said, some of them can reduce IATs, which lets you run at higher power levels for longer. Some of them also make the turbo hilariously loud because we have an internal wastegate and so the sound is mostly coming out of the intake. The PRL HVI and inlet pipe do both, without a tune.

There are no basemaps for intake parts on either tuning platform and the only Hondata intake mod that actually does anything is for the Eventuri intake, as it modifies the airflow passing over the MAF. It modifies the MAF calibration only.

The PRL downpipe and intercooler should be purchased before the HVI and inlet pipe, as they will do much more for power. They have their own basemaps available, too, meaning you don't have to pay for a custom tune. I have all of them and they are perfect together.

Once you've combined enough parts, you may want to adjust your air charge limit tables. It's really simple and is the most you'll need to do. Part of the reason they recommend a tune for the inlet pipe is because it was the last piece of the puzzle we were all waiting for, and so it was making many of us max out our fuel pumps more often since we had every other supporting part. While not dangerous, it's not ideal.

Tl;dr: it can't cause any issues, even with every single intake part, until you're on a custom tune anyways.

You can read more about stuff like this in this thread.
 
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frtorres87

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Is this available yet?
 

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Dang so I just installed this yesterday and the silicone hose to the HVI was way more difficult than the older hose. Had a lot of trouble getting the small nose in there, and now I'm running into the issue with either rubbing the hood with the flange, or the hose depending on how I've rotated it. Have to take a look again later :(
 

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="kefi, post: 841471, member: 35728"]
The only parts that need a tune to be run safely are:
  1. Fuel system upgrades
  2. Different sized injectors, turbocharger, or cams
You still want a tune, but could run on factory for:
  1. Catless downpipe (to cancel the errors from not having a cat) or high flow cat
  2. Intakes that modify the volume of air passing over the MAF sensor (currently only the Eventuri)
Our ECU compensates just fine for the differences in most of these intakes, as well as most other bolt-on parts, so it's safe.

FYI, intake parts for the most part don't really do all that much on our cars except allow additional airflow you can't make much use of until you've installed an upgraded turbo or fuel system. Many of them only reduce power. There isn't really much tuning to be done for them.

That being said, some of them can reduce IATs, which lets you run at higher power levels for longer. Some of them also make the turbo hilariously loud because we have an internal wastegate and so the sound is mostly coming out of the intake. The PRL HVI and inlet pipe do both, without a tune.

There are no basemaps for intake parts on either tuning platform and the only Hondata intake mod that actually does anything is for the Eventuri intake, as it modifies the airflow passing over the MAF. It modifies the MAF calibration only.

The PRL downpipe and intercooler should be purchased before the HVI and inlet pipe, as they will do much more for power. They have their own basemaps available, too, meaning you don't have to pay for a custom tune. I have all of them and they are perfect together.

Once you've combined enough parts, you may want to adjust your air charge limit tables. It's really simple and is the most you'll need to do. Part of the reason they recommend a tune for the inlet pipe is because it was the last piece of the puzzle we were all waiting for, and so it was making many of us max out our fuel pumps more often since we had every other supporting part. While not dangerous, it's not ideal.

Tl;dr: it can't cause any issues, even with every single intake part, until you're on a custom tune anyways.

You can read more about stuff like this in this thread.
I'm really hoping that a more affordable HPFP solution comes out. I don't need a ton more - maybe just 10% - 20% more flow. I have every possible bolt on right now, and my pump is pretty much maxed on a basemap.
 

AdamD19DFK8

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The only parts that need a tune to be run safely are:
  1. Fuel system upgrades
  2. Different sized injectors, turbocharger, or cams
You still want a tune, but could run on factory for:
  1. Catless downpipe (to cancel the errors from not having a cat) or high flow cat
  2. Intakes that modify the volume of air passing over the MAF sensor (currently only the Eventuri)
Our ECU compensates just fine for the differences in most of these intakes, as well as most other bolt-on parts, so it's safe.

FYI, intake parts for the most part don't really do all that much on our cars except allow additional airflow you can't make much use of until you've installed an upgraded turbo or fuel system. Many of them only reduce power. There isn't really much tuning to be done for them.

That being said, some of them can reduce IATs, which lets you run at higher power levels for longer. Some of them also make the turbo hilariously loud because we have an internal wastegate and so the sound is mostly coming out of the intake. The PRL HVI and inlet pipe do both, without a tune.

There are no basemaps for intake parts on either tuning platform and the only Hondata intake mod that actually does anything is for the Eventuri intake, as it modifies the airflow passing over the MAF. It modifies the MAF calibration only.

The PRL downpipe and intercooler should be purchased before the HVI and inlet pipe, as they will do much more for power. They have their own basemaps available, too, meaning you don't have to pay for a custom tune. I have all of them and they are perfect together.

Once you've combined enough parts, you may want to adjust your air charge limit tables. It's really simple and is the most you'll need to do. Part of the reason they recommend a tune for the inlet pipe is because it was the last piece of the puzzle we were all waiting for, and so it was making many of us max out our fuel pumps more often since we had every other supporting part. While not dangerous, it's not ideal.

Tl;dr: it can't cause any issues, even with every single intake part, until you're on a custom tune anyways.

You can read more about stuff like this in this thread.
Of all their bolt ons i've gotten, the only time something needed to be changed with my tune after instillation was from the larger cold side silicone hose and charge pipe. In 3rd gear only, I would max out my fuel pump from 4.5k-5.5k. In 4th and up I actually had higher torque targets that never came close to maxing out.

At first I just reduced my 3rd gear torque targets and left the others alone. Then I came back after reworking my lambda tables and increased 3rd gear torque again and targeted peak torque around 5k rpm and the cars ran great.

When I installed the HVI, nothing needed to be changed, and a few days later the same with the new inlet.
 

GotCTR?

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is this really needed?
or just for looks seems like a waste of money
 

VTEC R

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is this really needed?
or just for looks seems like a waste of money
This is the product description that says “just for looks, waste of money”:

Please Read Before Ordering:
  • TUNE RECOMMENDED
Technical Notes:

The PRL Motorsports Turbocharger Inlet Pipe Kit is a direct bolt-on upgrade that eliminates airflow restriction before the turbocharger, allowing the turbocharger to operate more efficiently. Our design utilizes a cast aluminum inlet piece to allow smooth transition from the gasket-matched 64mm ID compressor inlet to a 80mm OD / 78mm ID oulet throughout the Titanium crossover pipe. This kit the largest inlet pipe available and offers over a 50% increase in airflow volume in comparison to the factory inlet pipe!

Performance Gains:
  • Increased bottom-end power and spool
Kit Includes:
  • (1) Cast Aluminum Inlet Piece
  • (1) 80mm OD Titanium Inlet Pipe
  • (2) High-Temp 4-Ply Silicone Coupler(s)
  • (6) 304 Stainless Steel Interlocking Worm Clamps
  • (1) Evap Flange (Anodized Black) (HVI customers are to use bung
 

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