Lurker_J's Burrows ('18 Si Sedan)

OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
here are some more pics I took just looking from under the rear of the car just now.

2AD8D3F4-79A3-4898-AF12-D91098B4D81A.jpeg


19D6D1EC-8B20-47D2-97CF-3990D00D0CCF.jpeg


A54CA517-12CC-4D15-A319-3CAA05BE9CDC.jpeg
Mine sits a little more straight than yours with less spring compression, but I don't hear clicks when I hit bumps or turn.
IMG_3858.jpg
Advertisement

 

Dirt

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2019
Messages
151
Reaction score
131
Location
Rhode Island
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Hatchback Sport 6-Spd Manual
Country flag
Are the two” feet” of the rubber boot under the spring in their holes in the lower control arm?

Also check the endlinks of the rear sway.
yeah, I called them nipples lol. I pulled them all the way down but they are in the right position. I’m going to take it off soon and check. The end link bolts are on tight in the rear.
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
yeah, I called them nipples lol. I pulled them all the way down but they are in the right position. I’m going to take it off soon and check. The end link bolts are on tight in the rear.
Yeah i only got clicks from my rear sway bar links when I actually replace the links and the bar with different ones. If there was a click from the endlinks, theyd be from the sway bar to end link part, not the LCA to endlink connection.

Only other thing I can think of is to raise the suspension in the rear a bit more and to give the springs more travel space
 

Dirt

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2019
Messages
151
Reaction score
131
Location
Rhode Island
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Hatchback Sport 6-Spd Manual
Country flag
Yeah i only got clicks from my rear sway bar links when I actually replace the links and the bar with different ones. If there was a click from the endlinks, theyd be from the sway bar to end link part, not the LCA to endlink connection.

Only other thing I can think of is to raise the suspension in the rear a bit more and to give the springs more travel space
Yeah everything seems to be tight and snug. Brought it on my friends lift and 3 other guys that are mechanics are scratching no their heads with me. You try and give something nice to the car and it acts up. Lol hate that. I’m gonna try and figure out if it is maybe those small end links that need to be replaced.
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
I experimented with getting rid of my general body rattle with my AC on due to my window-welded Rear Motor Mount. Found out that K-tuner sets idle to around 1100 RPM when the car is warm to get rid of harder motor mount chassis rattle so I tried it on my Flashpro, but with the goal of using the lowest RPM possible to get rid of excessive fuel usage, but still accomplish the goal of less rattle.

Baseline idle is 720 RPM when the car is in the "warm" range so I tried the 1100 RPM idle, 950 RPM idle, then finally 800 RPM idle and found that the small idle raise to 800 RPM from 720 RPM still gets rid of the rattle created by the RMM with the AC on, which is much needed for current and future super hot summers.

I am a super noob when it comes to messing with tuning, but I wanted to write this up for others who are also novices when messing with their engine ECU.

Here is the normal idle settings related to the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT). Find this in the Calibration tab in Flashpro manager under the Idle subheading.

The ECT 170 to 212*F range is going to be your "normal" operating temperature range.
We are changing that range of RPM values under the ECT range within the top table "Idle speed (normal)".
nl idle.jpg


Set the RPM values under the ECT range of 170-212 from 720 to 800 across the board to raise your at rest idle. Then save and upload the tune to car with new idle.
800 idle.jpg


If you already have a tune on the car, make sure you load the tuned file up in your FP manager and then mess with the idle. Always have an untampered save file of your tune before you mess with the idle in case anything goes wrong and you can start fresh.
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Always liked partially yellow lights and yellow fogs so decided them for myself. Fogs are Lamin-x and Headlights vinyls are from Premium Auto Styling.

The material of the Lamin-x feels better quality and the DRL running lights are cut kind of small. I had to place the vinyl more toward the center of the light so it would cover more of the white DRL running behind it. If you follow the outer edge of the vinyl with the outer edge of the light, the inner portions of the DRL don't get covered. They don't show this in the DRL vinyl example pictures on all the different sellers websites.

It isn't too big of a shift of the vinyl to cover the whole DRL, but it takes some patience to get it right.

IMG_3896.jpg
IMG_3908.jpg

IMG_3897.jpg
IMG_3898.jpg

IMG_3909.jpg


I think I need to get actual yellow fog bulbs to really get the yellow effect I'm looking for
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Finally started using my flashpro to actually monitor my engine dynamics as I drove and I noticed my IATs (1 and 2) get into the 110s during freeway driving with high 80s humid heat environment.

I bought the V2 PRL downpipe a while ago but couldn't figure out how to get the DP back into the engine bay with the heat shields on back when I got it.

I decided to try to get those heatshields back on AND DEI heatwrap the pipe after reading this old Hondatech thread: Heat Manaagement Testing

I have yet to take the car out for a drive to see if there was an effect on IAT, but I hope so. I also understand that a new intercooler would be the best for our forced induction vehicles, but this was just something to play with that is much cheaper as well as actually get the heatshields back on the DP.

To clarify, the heatshields fit the PRL pipes just fine. I was just trying to put the DP in from the top of the engine bay when I initally tried. This time I approached from the bottom and was successful. To actually have the heatshields back on, install the middle of pipe head shield that wraps around the center, install pipe on turbo, then put the top heatshield over the down pipe. It is a very tight fit to reach the bolts for the top heatshield while the pipe is attached since the turbo intake pipe is in the way, but you can get to it. You also have to put some pressure on the top heatshield toward the engine in order to get the heatshield to line up perfectly and get the bolts in easier.

IMG_3927.jpg
IMG_3925.jpg
IMG_3928.jpg
IMG_3926.jpg
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Add/changed a couple more parts today:

Acuity shifter bushings:
Very easy install that only required me to remove the battery and tray out of the way (and upper strut bar if you have one). Shifting feels more accurate and smoother into the gears. Wanted to try these bushings out to feel the difference before I invest in the stage 3 short shifter. Great easy little upgrade to the shifter system.

Battery uses 10 mm nuts all around on both the wires and mounting box that need to be removed. Used a medium size screw driver to wrestle out the OEM bushings and a small pick to pull off the OEM clips that hold the bushings to the shifter arm on transmission.

IMG_3967.jpg

I was able to get the bushings out without taking the retaining clips that hold the shift linkages in place. I was careful to be keep the linkages at the same level they were at as much as possible, working on them just to the side of where they attach so not to bend them too drastically. The view shown is with battery out.
Used this video for easiest instructions on removing old bushings and inserting new ones properly.


Hasport 62A Rear Motor Mount:
I had this installed on my car early on, but removed it due to the NVH while at idle with my AC on. Went to the window-weld RMM to for a happy medium, but I always missed the responsiveness I had from the Hasport 62A. I noted on post #125 that I was able to get rid of my cockpit NVH with the AC on by slightly raising the idle, so I wanted to see if that cure worked for the Hasport mount too.

Watched the forums for a used one and was able to get one with 5k miles on it. It was still in great condition with normal wear and tear, but more importantly, the bushings were broken in. Seller was also selling due to the NVH at idle with AC on.

The mount uses a 19 mm bolt on the rear of the engine and a 17 mm bolt on the front subframe. Used a breaker bar/socket wrench to loosen/remove the subframe bolt and a monkey wrench set at 19 mm to remove the bolt on the engine. The front pipe gets in the way of removing the 19 mm bolt completely, so loosen the bolt until the threads are out of it's opposite carrier, then completely remove the 17 mm bolt on the subframe so you can wiggle the RMM downward from the front with a crowbar and there is a hole cut out on the bracket for the 19 mm bolt to come down through. You pull the whole mount of with the 19 mm loosely in the RMM, then remove the bolt completely when the RMM is completely off the car.

To install, I got the Hasport mount as far in by hand as I could, then used a crow bar (or pry bar) and rubber mallet to wedge the mount back into place without any bolts in. I inserted the 19 mm bolt back into the front of the mount as I pry downward on the mount (the same as when I was removing the original RMM) and stuck the bolt loosely back in and pushed mount with bolt back up into the carrier to line up. Both bolts get torqued back down to 69 ft/lbs, but I couldn't get my torque wrench in place for the front mount due to the front pipe, so I just felt how much force 69 ft/lbs was for the rear bolt and simulated that for the front with the monkey wrench.


The NVH was still cured with the raised idle to 800 RPM at warm engine operating conditions (between 170-212*F). The car also still does not have cockpit NVH even with the AC on full blast. The only time you get a semblance of the harsh NVH similar to the stock idle RPM is between 900-950 RPM and only when I am playing with clutch when trying to back up or reproduce the NVH by playing with the throttle.

While driving, the NVH was reproduced when I lugged the engine a bit going around a slow corner and trying to accelerate in 3rd gear, when 2nd was probably more appropriate. Even then, the NVH was for such a short time frame, it is not bothersome to me at this time.

I am glad to have my smooth and responsive acceleration back. The engine responds much smoother and quicker to my throttle inputs and feels more planted as it runs through the RPMs and gear changes.
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Can anyone point me in the right direction to get affordable automotive paint and clear for a spray gun? I have the spray gun already, but minimal research showed a gallon of white orchid pearl to be close to $400.

I've had a type R style rear bumper cover sitting for a long time and finally was prodded to test fit it or get rid of it by wife. In case anyone is thinking of it, if you have the MAPerformance exhaust, you'll need to cut a bottom piece off the "diffuser" to make it fit.
IMG_3987.jpg



Here is the lack of clearance on the diffuser
64797223126__EFEAADEF-89B8-4EDE-8B02-3B1F6203889C.jpg
IMG_3981.jpg


Because of the lack of clearance, the bumper won't go on fully. One side is completely on, but won't reach the other side clips.
IMG_3983.jpg


I'm excited to get this bumper painted and on the car though since will help the flow of the body work with the HFP side skirts.
IMG_3985.jpg


With the diffuser off, the bumper fits great!

64797364260__280242ED-EC98-4A72-91D8-3CBAAA2AB893.jpg


64797365149__A9133BAB-6A86-4542-BB83-A08DE0C478FE.jpg
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Finally permanently mounted my Tein EDFC controller. I had it mounted with double sided tape but the summer heat melts the adhesive and causes the controller to sag. I also kept punching the controller when I shift into 3rd gear.

Here is the original mounting location (wire was tucked previously and looked great, it was just in the way sometimes and would fall)
IMG_4005.jpg


I picked up a couple L-shaped brackets (3/4 in x 1/2 in) and drilled them just under the driver's side vent.
IMG_4003.jpg


Drilled a big 'ol hole in between those two mount plates so I could run the wire through and have it tucked since loose wires bother me. There aren't any wires behind the plastic CF trim. Just have to drill at a downward angle so you don't hit the vent above. I have my other EDFC boxes mounted just under the dash just behind the disable traction control button so everything is all in one place now. Mounted the controller with Loctite superglue and it was hardened in less than a minute.

IMG_4011.jpg

IMG_4012.jpg

IMG_4008.jpg

Controller is much easier to see now when I need to adjust settings on the road and looks much cleaner.
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Wheel paint and restore

My wheels were in need of overhaul over years of abuse. I was inspired to paint my wheels after seeing the bronze ESR SR01s on this MKV Supra:
IMG_2674.jpg

But I didn't want to pay forged ESR wheel prices and get them custom bronze polished. So I decided to get close for cheaper.

My wife mocked up this great test "photoshop" for me, done on a phone markup 😆:
IMG_1129.jpg



I used the following supplies (with prices for your reference if you want to do yourself) and order of operation to get it done:

Washed the wheel with Turtle Wax Max Power ($8.99)
turtle wax.jpeg


Sprayed Brakleen ($4.99) on the wheel hub, external wheel, and internal wheel mounting face. Used blue 3M stripping pad ($6.48 for 4-pack, used one) to scrub external wheel faces and scuff/clean painting area. Used a gold wire brush and stripping pads to clean wheel hub and internal mounting face of any rust.
brake cleen.jpeg
3m strip pad.jpeg
gold wire brush.jpeg


Dremel Multimax tool ($99--had this from previous project so didn't spend for this project) with 120 grit sand paper to sand down dents and deep scratches. (Google image to give you idea of product)
Dremel-Multitool08.jpeg

Don't use it on whole wheel as it doesn't get all the nooks and can run off and hit places you don't want to paint/repair. I then dry hand-sanded with 100 grit and 360 grit paper after (had this paper from past projects) on the rest of the rim. This took the longest since prepping the wheel well makes the paint stick better. Washed the wheel again with turtle wax wash and let dry.

Taped off the parts of the wheel I wasn't going to paint/wanted to protect with 3M blue painters tape ($19.98 for pack of 3, used 1.5 whole rolls) and 5x7 note cards ($0.89 per pack of 100, used 150 cards). Protected wheel face and tire edges. This takes 2nd longest to get all the edges right.
IMG_4038.jpg


I painted wheels once before in a friend's garage when I was a teenager and didn't think about overspray, ruining a lot of things in the garage. I instead made a makeshift paint room out of x8 lightweight shower liner curtains ($2.89 each), x3 packs of hooks ($0.99 per pack of 12 hooks), and pop up canopy from Wal-Mart ($39.99). I bought a Xpower fan ($99.00) to vent the fumes out of the tent as best I could. Wore an old paint respirator I already had while inside. I enjoy painting parts myself so this is a investment for future projects as well.
IMG_4039.jpg
12178098.jpg


After I taped the wheels and just prior to painting, I used a 32 oz. can of Acetone ($8.98, used about half the can) and paper towels to wipe down the wheel rims of any grease and grime until the paper towels were wiping clean. I then began to paint. Painting occurred in 80*F-90*F weather, clear skies, moderately humid, very minimal wind.

For priming, I used Duplicolor FP101 Scratch Filler & Primer Gray 11 oz cans ($13.16 per can, used 2 cans in total for 4 wheels) x2 light-wet coats of primer then x1 coat of medium-wet coat. Waited 10 minutes between coats then 30 minutes after final primer coat before painting. Lightly sanded the last coat with 800 grit dry sandpaper after the 30 minute wait time and tack clothed ($2.69 for 1) the painted surface before starting on the base coat paint.
Primer.jpg
tack cloth.jpeg


Basecoat is Bronze Duplicolor HWP105 ($6.00 per can, used 2 cans, bought a 6-pack because I overestimated). Sprayed x3 light-wet coats then x1 coat of medium-wet coat. Waited 10 minutes between coats then 30 minutes after final base coat before using clear coat. Used tack cloth to clear any debris after 30 minute final coat dry.
Bronze.jpg


Clearcoat is Spraymax 2K clear 368 0061 (69.00 for a 4 pack, used 2 cans). Sprayed x3 medium-wet coats of clear coat with 10 minutes drying in-between the coats. After the last coat, moved the wheels into my garage to dry (full cure in 24 hours). Wheels are able to be handled after 1 hour and I removed tape from wheels after 15 hours. Drove on them without paint issue after 22 hours.

It is a pricey clear coat but really gives a great shine and protection you just can't get with an off-the-shelf gloss at Home Depot or Lowes. The hardener is what is really needed and gets mixed in the can when you prime it. You take the red cap off the top of the can and put it under the can and crush it down to prime the can. The can is usable for 48 hours after that, then the mix will go bad.
2k clear.jpg


Here is the final product:
IMG_4047.jpg

IMG_4050.jpg


Comparison of before and after:
IMG_1130.JPG

IMG_4078.jpg


Total working time spent sanding, prepping, and painting (without final clear dry waiting time): 16 hours

I'm really happy with how they came out. The wheels have definitely been finally revitalized. I don't have pics of how bad they used to be, but the polished wheel had gone pretty dull and grimey over time. XXR puts a hardened film over their polished wheel rims and the first injuries to the wheels created cracks that let water and grime in under the hard film, destroying the shine they used to have in the 'before' pic.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
A-pillar rattle delete

Since I reinstalled a stiff rear motor mount, I've had a pretty mean A-pillar rattle and finally decided to do something about it. Respect to Brian Austin (I don't know if he's on these forums) on youtube.

His video I linked shows rattle coming from the A-pillar side airbag sensor connections hitting the plastic A-pillar cover as well as the A-pillar cover rattle on the A-pillar itself. It is solved using small felt furniture pads placed on the connections between them and the plastic A-pillar cover.
EDIT: I also added some thin weatherstrip foam to the inside of the A-pillar covers since I still have some minor rattle from the edges of the cover.
1627220509986.png
IMG_4086.jpg


Use a screwdriver or plastic pry bar to get the small airbag square sign off the A-pillar plastic cover to reveal A-pillar screw screw.
IMG_4087.jpg


Use an 8mm socket or small philips screw driver to remove screw holding A-pillar plastic cover down.
IMG_4083.jpg


Lift up and out on A-pillar cover to remove. There is one clip on the inside you will hear pop.
Place felt pads on the airbag connectors facing toward center of dashboard.
IMG_4084.jpg


Place foam weatherstripping on edges of A-pillar cover.
IMG_4085.jpg

Reinstall A-pillar trim in reverse order.

Total labor time: 15 minutes for both driver and passenger sides together
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Likewise Fingerbanger shift knob with Rod Stewart Pro extension and shift boot adapter install

IMG_4164.jpg
IMG_4163.jpg

I wanted to try a different shifting feel so I went the opposite of what most do and raised the shifter up with an extension. I wasn't having any difficulty with my ball-top shifter, I just wanted a different feeling to spice it up. The Likewise Fingerbanger looked like it would feel strong and fun as it has a rung for each of your finger and the raised height with the extension makes it's lift ergonomic for me to hold it as intended.

I'm coming from a 490g weighted ball to a 298g knob and 350g extension bar, so you can definitely feel the heft of this, especially with the longer throws. I am almost a little nervous I will get overzealous punching into a gear and will bend the shifter arm with the inertia the extra weight causes. I will report if I do. But the extra throw makes driving more interesting again since I am punching like it's a big rig.

What was frustrating is getting all the logos to line up straight. There is an LW logo on the knob, the extension, and the collar. There is also a hex screw on the top of both the extension rod and on the threading adapter underneath it used on the shifter itself that you can raise and lower so it limits how much you can thread down the knob/extension (LW products are all threaded at M20 x 1.5 mm so you have to get an adapter for each part that connects to something that is not an LW product. The extension into the knob did not need an adapter, but if I were to use the knob without the extension, I have to install a different adapter to get it to fit the shifter). With this, the LW logo can line up in any which way when the products are threaded down tight and you adjust the hex screw based off how much you need to turn the LW, but it sucks because the only way to know the logo is straight is to repeatedly screw and unscrew the knob/extension and play with the hex screw underneath. I am very nitpicky about everything being straight so I spent most of my time repeatedly doing this for an hour to first get the extension LW straight, then the knob up top straight. It was really annoying if you get anxiety from things not being subjectively perfect.

My shift boot would not stay up with the addition of this shifter, so I had to get a shift boot collar adapter to make it work. Here is how I installed it:

Shift Boot Collar Adapter Install

Remove current shift knob by twisting counter-clockwise. The OEM shift boot collar on the Si is a 14 mm nut. Remove this with a wrench. It is tight so put some force counter-clockwise to get it off. You will not need it with a new collar.
IMG_4161.jpg


Use a plastic pry tool or screwdriver with tape/felt on the end (to prevent damage) to pop up side trim pieces. There are four little white push in clips that you are popping out of their holes that you can see in the 3rd picture below.
IMG_4159.jpg
IMG_4160.jpg
IMG_4158.jpg


There will be one screw on each side of the console to remove, left and right.
IMG_4157.jpg


After the screws are removed, lift up on the both the rear left and right pieces of the trim and you will pop out more white clips. There are size in total all around, so pull from the rear, middle, then front of the console. Don't pull too high and hard as the connections for the buttons need to be undone.
IMG_4156.jpg
IMG_4155.jpg


With the center trim off, flip the boot inside out and you will see a small zip tie holding the plastic silver boot trim in place. Remove the zip tie and the silver piece will come out easily. Install the new collar from the external leather side (the original top) and put the butt of the collar down into the inside out boot and lock with zip tie.
IMG_4153.jpg
IMG_4154.jpg


Reinstall all trim in reverse.

Total labor time: 30 minutes
 
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
RallyArmor Mud Flaps Install

The hard plastic Honda mudguards hurt my car when I would go over bumps and the guards would scrape, but I still need guards to protect my paint and car body because of the poke fitment of the wheels. Rally armor is a trusted brand and though they are pricey, they are well made and fit the poke wheel fitment of my car. I wasn't a fan of them on other cars with tucked or flush fitment since the Rally Armor flaps stick out quite a bit.

Went with the dark gray lettering to keep it subdued have the wheels still pop and draw the attention.

I didn't document the install this time like I did others, but Pawinning's youtube video helped prep me for the ordeal:

Total labor time: 2 hours -- mostly being nitpicky about getting the flaps lined up flat to the ground as possible.

IMG_4186.jpg


IMG_4188.jpg


I like that they are stealth from the front, but fit the car all around.
IMG_4184.jpg

IMG_4183.jpg

IMG4209.jpg

IMG_4180.jpeg
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
lurker_j

lurker_j

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2018
Messages
527
Reaction score
354
Location
US
Car(s)
'18 WOP FC1
Build Thread
Link
Country flag
Having a lowered car has been fun, but the ride quality isn't the greatest during daily commutes and I always felt insecure about going over road hazards. So instead, I decided to lift the car and start to on a overland/battlecar route. I am always one for trying new things so here is my now lifted civic (@ end of post)

I'm still on my Tein suspension, but I raised it as high as I could and also added 1.5 in lift spacers from HRG Engineering to get more height. I don't remember what the stock ride height was since I've been lowered for so long.
IMG_4604.jpg
IMG_4605.jpg


I also added went smaller wheels with bigger tires to experiment. I am now on Black Rhino Boxer 15x7 with 205/70 Yokohama Geolandr All-Terrain tires. I originally was on 255/35r18.
IMG_4606.jpg

IMG_4607.jpg


15 in wheels DO NOT FIT Si's naturally.

Unfortunately, I made this mistake and forgot to research the brake clearance differences between Si's and the lower trims. Other's experience said 15's fit on their civics, but those were Ex/Sport trims and lower. Si front brake discs and calipers are bigger and I didn't learn until I couldn't clear the front brakes with the new wheels. The rear brakes clear fine.

You can see the caliper hitting the inside of the wheel.
IMG_4613.jpg


You can see where the scraping on the caliper occured as I wrestled to try and fit the wheel, and where it scratched the inside of the wheel itself.
IMG_4612.jpg

IMG_4615.jpg


Because I had already invested in the wheels and tires, I had to convert my front brakes from the Si ones to the smaller Sport calipers and rotors.
Here is the slight size difference between the rotors. Si= 312 mm, Sport= 282 mm. Thanks to @Hondanickx for his Brake Info Thread. It was very helpful in solving my problems.
IMG_4674.jpg

IMG_4675.jpg

The dust shield doesn't need to be trimmed at all and the new brake calipers bolt right in.
IMG_4682.jpg

I am much happier with my ride quality now. I still have a lot of pep from my other upgrades and it feels great.

New height clearance gives me 9.5 inches in the front and 13 in the rear. When its time for new tires, I plan on going bigger to 225 or 235/75 to get close to a 29 in diameter that will fully fill the wheel well.

Civic1.jpg
IMG_4687.jpg
IMG_4713.jpg
IMG_4716.jpg
IMG_4717.jpg
IMG_4718.jpg
IMG_4719.jpg
IMG_4720.jpg
 
Advertisement

 
Advertisement
Top