Looking for new tires for my stock rims

Civii

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Hello, I drive a 2017 Honda Civic Sedan Touring with their stock 17" rims, that I actually like, but I'm thinking of getting new tires. When I installed a cai and got it tuned I noticed the stock tires have poor grip. They tend to slip from time to time when I punch it. I live in SoCal where it doesn't rain to often but I'm in the high desert and when it does rain it tends to flood a bit and rain a lot. I'm looking for new tires that have better performance and a better overall ride. I'd prefer all season because I don't like the idea of changing them throughout the year to a different set depending on the season and because of the price. Anyone have recommendations for good tires that can fit on my stock rims? I don't know much about tires and was eye balling the PS4S's but I'm confused because they say they're summer tires but when reading reviews it seems like they have good wet traction also. Does that mean they can do well when it rains? It also appears like it possible won't fit on my rim? I'm not too familiar with sizes and all. I have stock suspension and don't plan to lower it anytime soon, if at all. Any recommendations would be great! Also, it's a daily driver.

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I don't know if all-seasons are really necessary in Southern California. Like you said, it only rains a handful of times here. I think you would personally be better off getting a set of summer tires. The PS4S's are excellent summer tires that also tend to do well when it rains considering the category they are in. Also if you wanted something a bit cheaper, you could go with Ventus V12 Evo2's which are also excellent summer tires that do well in the rain. Albeit, they have a softer sidewall than the PS4S's so they will feel a bit more disconnected from the road, but from my experience, they're still really good.
 
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I don't know if all-seasons are really necessary in Southern California. Like you said, it only rains a handful of times here. I think you would personally be better off getting a set of summer tires. The PS4S's are excellent summer tires that also tend to do well when it rains considering the category they are in. Also if you wanted something a bit cheaper, you could go with Ventus V12 Evo2's which are also excellent summer tires that do well in the rain. Albeit, they have a softer sidewall than the PS4S's so they will feel a bit more disconnected from the road, but from my experience, they're still really good.
Do you know what tire size for the PS4S’s would fit well with my rim size? Their vehicle selector says it won’t fit but I think I’ve seen people get them to fit but none mention which size they went with.
 

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Do you know what tire size for the PS4S’s would fit well with my rim size? Their vehicle selector says it won’t fit but I think I’ve seen people get them to fit but none mention which size they went with.
I think they are 215 50 R17. If you look at the sidewall of your current tires, they should display the correct dimensions similar to what I just listed.
 

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Stock wheel size should be 7x17 +45.
Stock tires are 215/50R17.

You can either stick with the same size tires, or up the width to 225, if you want.
225/50/R17 or 225/45/R17 is fine.

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Stock wheel size should be 7x17 +45.
Stock tires are 215/50R17.

You can either stick with the same size tires, or up the width to 225, if you want.
225/50/R17 or 225/45/R17 is fine.

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Can I get a link to that calculator/comparison? Also, is there any downsides or negative affects to running a slight bigger tire or smaller tire than stock on the stock rim?
 

jayy_swish

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You live in California summer tires all the way! I run them year round no issues (Los Angeles county), just the tires aren’t so great at or under 40°, so let the tires warm up with some normal driving before doing crazy driving. Summer tires offer better traction in both dry and wet than AS. AS are meant for that all season and that’s why they have thick tread and weird tread patterns for all the elements it may encounter. Summer tires have less tread thickness (usually don’t last as long as all seasons) and less tread pattern (which means more rubber touching the road) so they offer amazing traction compared to all seasons. PS4’s are the best seller in the summer tire market, if your on a budget Indy 500’s are also great for the price for summer tires. Currently running Indy 500’s and love them, but once they’re eaten up will be switching to PS4’s for sure. Also because summer tires stay more planted to the road (they’re stickier tires) they tend to have a bit of a harsher ride and a tiny bit louder ride compared to your regular car consumer car tires.
 
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You live in California summer tires all the way! I run them year round no issues (Los Angeles county), just the tires aren’t so great at or under 40°, so let the tires warm up with some normal driving before doing crazy driving. Summer tires offer better traction in both dry and wet than AS. AS are meant for that all season and that’s why they have thick tread and weird tread patterns for all the elements it may encounter. Summer tires have less tread thickness (usually don’t last as long as all seasons) and less tread pattern (which means more rubber touching the road) so they offer amazing traction compared to all seasons. PS4’s are the best seller in the summer tire market, if your on a budget Indy 500’s are also great for the price for summer tires. Currently running Indy 500’s and love them, but once they’re eaten up will be switching to PS4’s for sure. Also because summer tires stay more planted to the road (they’re stickier tires) they tend to have a bit of a harsher ride and a tiny bit louder ride compared to your regular car consumer car tires.
Have you used the all summer tires in the Antelope Valley area when it gets around 25-35 degrees with some ice on the roads? Just recently (last 2 years) it’s snowed and been icy for about a week during winter in the AV area. Again, the snow and ice conditions aren’t common but have occurred the last two years during winter. The cold weather (25-40 fahrenheit) is common though in morning in the Antelope Valley. It’s either, really hot or really cold. How better are the PS4S’s compared to the All seasons? Will they be terrible during the light snow or ice times?
 

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Have you used the all summer tires in the Antelope Valley area when it gets around 25-35 degrees with some ice on the roads? Just recently (last 2 years) it’s snowed and been icy for about a week during winter in the AV area. Again, the snow and ice conditions aren’t common but have occurred the last two years during winter. The cold weather (25-40 fahrenheit) is common though in morning in the Antelope Valley. It’s either, really hot or really cold. How better are the PS4S’s compared to the All seasons? Will they be terrible during the light snow or ice times?
If that’s the case then I would get some Michelin all season performances tires. Some PS A/S
 

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I recently put on a set of Falken ZIEX960 all season and have been really impressed with their performance in wet and dry weather. They have a slight rumble but not too annoying. Definitely a sportier feel and handling. And they were priced decently, too. I like 'em.
 

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Can I get a link to that calculator/comparison? Also, is there any downsides or negative affects to running a slight bigger tire or smaller tire than stock on the stock rim?
Here you go:
https://tiresize.com/calculator/
https://www.wheel-size.com/calc/?wh...35-17X7ET45&fcl=50mm&wcl=30mm&scl=50mm&sr=0mm

A wider tire gives you more road contact, well, to grip the road.
That was the reason I upsized from 235 (stock) to 245 when I got new wheels and tires.
(Since my Hatchback is only summer driven, and tuned, I'm considering going up another size to 255 🤣)

Larger sidewall ratio typically gives you a smoother ride, as the tire sidewall can absorb some of the road noise, and small bumps. Smaller sidewall ratio gives the tire less flex, and helps with control/steering, but can also give a stiffer ride.

Generally, to keep the speedometer as accurate as possible, and to avoid disrupting any of the electronics, you want to keep the change as close to stock as possible.

In your case, going from a 50% ratio to 45% isn't too much a difference..
The downsides/negative effects are minor.

For an example, going to 215/35/R17 will throw things quite a bit off...the drop from 50% to 35% is quite aggressive.
1586681453224.png


Given that your wheels are 7" wide, 225 is the maximum you want to go -- if you want to increase the width.
225/50/R17 will increase your tire sidewall by 0.2" from stock, speedo ~1 mph off at high speed (faster).
225/45/R17 will decrease your tire sidewall by 0.2" from stock, speedo ~1 mph off at high speed (slower).
I guess your car would "look" every so slightly lower with the 45% ratio.

If you get snow/ice in your area, AND you drive in those conditions, I would recommend the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ if you want a high performance all-season. Otherwise, UHP Summers for your warmer year around California conditions would be great. Still very good performance at a lower price point, the Firestone FireHawk Indy 500's would be my recommendation as well -- since that is what I'm currently running. If you are willing to pay the price for the extra performance, Michelin Pilot Sport 4 or 4S would be it.
 
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Here you go:
https://tiresize.com/calculator/
https://www.wheel-size.com/calc/?wh...35-17X7ET45&fcl=50mm&wcl=30mm&scl=50mm&sr=0mm

A wider tire gives you more road contact, well, to grip the road.
That was the reason I upsized from 235 (stock) to 245 when I got new wheels and tires.
(Since my Hatchback is only summer driven, and tuned, I'm considering going up another size to 255 🤣)

Larger sidewall ratio typically gives you a smoother ride, as the tire sidewall can absorb some of the road noise, and small bumps. Smaller sidewall ratio gives the tire less flex, and helps with control/steering, but can also give a stiffer ride.

Generally, to keep the speedometer as accurate as possible, and to avoid disrupting any of the electronics, you want to keep the change as close to stock as possible.

In your case, going from a 50% ratio to 45% isn't too much a difference..
The downsides/negative effects are minor.

For an example, going to 215/35/R17 will throw things quite a bit off...the drop from 50% to 35% is quite aggressive.
1586681453224.png


Given that your wheels are 7" wide, 225 is the maximum you want to go -- if you want to increase the width.
225/50/R17 will increase your tire sidewall by 0.2" from stock, speedo ~1 mph off at high speed (faster).
225/45/R17 will decrease your tire sidewall by 0.2" from stock, speedo ~1 mph off at high speed (slower).
I guess your car would "look" every so slightly lower with the 45% ratio.

If you get snow/ice in your area, AND you drive in those conditions, I would recommend the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ if you want a high performance all-season. Otherwise, UHP Summers for your warmer year around California conditions would be great. Still very good performance at a lower price point, the Firestone FireHawk Indy 500's would be my recommendation as well -- since that is what I'm currently running. If you are willing to pay the price for the extra performance, Michelin Pilot Sport 4 or 4S would be it.
Hello again and thank you for the link, it’s pretty helpful. Do the wider tires change the way the car handles? Any cons to getting them wider (225)? Also, wouldn’t the 225/50 make the car look slightly “lower” than the 45 because of the slightly bigger sidewall?
 

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Hello again and thank you for the link, it’s pretty helpful. Do the wider tires change the way the car handles? Any cons to getting them wider (225)? Also, wouldn’t the 225/50 make the car look slightly “lower” than the 45 because of the slightly bigger sidewall?
Assuming same tire brand and model:

Wider wheels/tires gives you better vehicle handling, and improved cornering.
This is because the sidewall is typically tire stiffer as you go down in sidewall ratio.
Braking and accelerating is usually also improved because of the wider contact patch.

The con / compromise with stiffer sidewall, is slightly more road noise into the cabin, and you may feel the road imperfections coming up the steering wheel and/or seat.


The MOST noticeable difference would be going from the factory all-season, to a high-performance all-season / summer tire. That will be almost night-and-day, in my opinion.


The 0.2" sidewall difference is quite small, you may or may not even notice it visually.
It will fill up the wheel well a bit more, BUT are you also higher up from the ground.
 

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I just posted this in another thread in this specific forum, but I will post this again, because i think my quick review would be helpful:

"I just replaced all 4 Firestone FT140 OEM tires on my 2016 Civic Sedan touring with the Bridgestone Turanza Quiettracks. Im usually a Michelin guy loving the MXV and a few others I've had on my previous 2011 TSX and 2001 Civic Coupe. I think it's a forgone conclusion that the Civic could use copious amounts of more sound insulation and the OEM Firestones only served to reverberate the intense road noise along Honolulu's patchy roadways. The new Quiettracks, in my research not only had across the board better reviews than the Michelin A/S, but it also said it rode quieter and had better treadwear. I took my chance, and even after only about 100 miles, you can immediately hear and feel the difference. The car rides like a near luxury car now, with muted road noise. On areas where it was difficult if not impossible to hold a phone conversation over CarPlay, you can barely hear the road rumble. The tires smooth out the harshness of the uneven pavement and the car handles much more sure-footed. I love that the tire is V-rated, not necessarily for the top speed, but in my opinion, for the enhanced handling. Overall, I would highly recommend the Turanza Quiettrack if you're looking for a good balance of performance, handling, and noise reduction. I cannot overstate how much the road noise ruckus has been reduced with these tires!"
 
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Civii

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I just posted this in another thread in this specific forum, but I will post this again, because i think my quick review would be helpful:

"I just replaced all 4 Firestone FT140 OEM tires on my 2016 Civic Sedan touring with the Bridgestone Turanza Quiettracks. Im usually a Michelin guy loving the MXV and a few others I've had on my previous 2011 TSX and 2001 Civic Coupe. I think it's a forgone conclusion that the Civic could use copious amounts of more sound insulation and the OEM Firestones only served to reverberate the intense road noise along Honolulu's patchy roadways. The new Quiettracks, in my research not only had across the board better reviews than the Michelin A/S, but it also said it rode quieter and had better treadwear. I took my chance, and even after only about 100 miles, you can immediately hear and feel the difference. The car rides like a near luxury car now, with muted road noise. On areas where it was difficult if not impossible to hold a phone conversation over CarPlay, you can barely hear the road rumble. The tires smooth out the harshness of the uneven pavement and the car handles much more sure-footed. I love that the tire is V-rated, not necessarily for the top speed, but in my opinion, for the enhanced handling. Overall, I would highly recommend the Turanza Quiettrack if you're looking for a good balance of performance, handling, and noise reduction. I cannot overstate how much the road noise ruckus has been reduced with these tires!"
I’ll definitely check them out! I don’t mind sacrificing some traction for ride quality, especially since I don’t have plans to track it.
 
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