Is the CTR right for me?

inquisitor

Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
Location
Canada
Car(s)
18 CTR, 03 Corolla
Live in Toronto, Canada. Not much of a driver since my work/friends are close and all I've got is an automatic 2005 Corolla.

When the 2017 Civic was released I instantly fell in love with it's appearance. No matter the colour, those rear lights looks great and stand out among all the homogeneous vehicles on the streets these days. Then I discovered the CTR and it was the first car I've ever actually wanted to drive and show off. Every other vehicle just feels like a means to get from A to B. I've considered the BRZ for a while, but never pulled the trigger since it didn't feel like a good daily driver. The CTR on the other hand has 4 doors, cargo space, more performance, and FWD for some extra stability on the snow/ice.

I'm not a huge racing fan or a car enthusiast. I'm simply a guy that fell in love with a high performance vehicle. Now the question: is it worth getting one?

I've never driven manual, nor do I know anyone with a manual transmission vehicle to lend me. I am planning to take some lessons just to get some experience, but I don't know if it's a good idea to jump into the deep end by making my first manual a CTR. I also don't know if I could live with driving stick in the city. I live in the suburbs so it's not as bad as downtown, but it's certainly not a country road. It would also be my only car as I'd get rid of the Corolla.

Financially it's a bit tough to swallow considering I'd also need to get 18 inch rims and two sets of tires for summer/winter in Toronto (shipping over the border from Tire Rack is hella pricy!), but it's not the end of the world. Mostly I'm just worried that I might be paying for a lot of performance that never gets truly appreciated given my driving background and life style. I've thought about grabbing a cheap manual car for 2 years until the 2019 update, but selling an old manual is going to be tough so maybe it would be better to just toss that money directly into the CTR now?

So, would anyone here have any advice for me in my current situation? Am I barking up the wrong tree?



Advertisement


 

totopo

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
346
Reaction score
299
Location
CA
Car(s)
'17 Civic Ex Hatch, 370z
Country flag
Don't have a CTR so can't answer your other questions, but I wouldn't be too concerned about driving manual. People make it out to be a much bigger deal than it is. Sure you will stall the first week you drive stick, but after about 2 weeks you'll lose most of your nervousness and wonder why you even worried. Remember, like everyone in europe and in the us a few decades ago knew how to drive stick. Everyone could do it. People here like to be elitist about driving stick but it isn't that difficult or special. A friend taught me how to drive stick in a few hours, then I borrowed a friend's manual for 2 days before I got my first manual car. It was embarassing how slow I was to drive it out of the lot and I think I stalled when driving home, but in the end everything worked out.

I would be more focused on the financial aspect than worry about manual.

If you do end up getting a CTR, after a few months or a year when you are comfortable driving your car (and maybe heel-toeing) consider going to your local track. You are lucky there is toronto motorsport park, then you can enjoy what the car was really made for.

https://torontomotorsportspark.com/toronto-motorsports-park-events/
 

Meat Hammer

Senior Member
First Name
Alec
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
120
Reaction score
168
Location
Eureka, CA
Car(s)
2017 CBP Civic Type R #1464
Country flag
To be honest it sounds like an SI would be better for you.
Agreed, or perhaps a manual Sport hatch? Buying a cheapo manual learner mule + CTR, or CTR only, are the routes a stubborn younger me would have chosen in your circumstances. The CTR is definitely daily-driveable, but you're correct that it is a plunge into the deep end coming from an automatic Corrola and no stick experience. I learned stick on a Mazda pickup, and have had more than 10 manuals before my CTR, but will say the FK8 is very easy and rewarding to learn the 3-pedal arts with.
 
OP

inquisitor

Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
Location
Canada
Car(s)
18 CTR, 03 Corolla
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Good advice, thank you!

If you do end up getting a CTR, after a few months or a year when you are comfortable driving your car (and maybe heel-toeing) consider going to your local track. You are lucky there is toronto motorsport park, then you can enjoy what the car was really made for.

https://torontomotorsportspark.com/toronto-motorsports-park-events/
My coworker takes his Mustang there every now and again, he was quite happy when he heard I was seriously considering the hobby. I think I'll go out with him a few times and see whether it's my cup of tea.

Buying a cheapo manual learner mule + CTR, or CTR only, are the routes a stubborn younger me would have chosen in your circumstances.
I'm certainly stubborn for a 27 year old, but I think I'll wait at least until 2018 before I commit to anything. However from the sound of things my lack of manual experience isn't a deal breaker which was my biggest worry. I have the cash today, just going to have to think a bit more whether I should put it into a cushy Audi, a spartan performance car, or take the middle ground with a sport version.
 

Acurately

Senior Member
Joined
May 2, 2017
Messages
86
Reaction score
91
Location
New Jersey
Car(s)
3G Acura TL, 1G Acura MDX
Country flag
I was in a same boat as you with the manual driving, and I wish I had a manual car for at least a week before I made my purchase, just to get a feel for a clutch, starting off from stop, braking, downshifting. I basically learned in a week to the point where I'm not nervous driving on the road and between cars.

Honestly it was a bit hard for me, and if I had a manual car for a week or so prior to purchase I probably would reconsider buying a CTR, but I'm actually glad I did, the car is great.

My advice is try to rent a manual car for a week or maybe find a really cheap one and sell it after, once you decide if driving manual car is for you, make your decision then.
 

Daa1216

@danilo.turbo
First Name
Danilo
Joined
Jun 28, 2017
Messages
14
Reaction score
6
Location
Los Angeles, CA
Car(s)
2015 Honda Civic Si, 2017 Honda Civic Type R
The Si sounds like a more viable option BUT if you really really really love and want the car then by all means go for it. I see it this way if you really want something and you know it'll make you happy just do it because if you don't then you'll be stuck wondering to yourself of what could have been or when you see one on the road just thinking damn I could've had one. It's definitely worth the money the experience is amazing it's extremely practical and not to mention really fun! Plus these transmissions are smooth as butter the clutch is super light and should be easy to learn with it is ridiculously difficult to stall it out. I say go for it! Plus you'll be owning a piece of Honda history!
 

17CivicTypeR_Brian

Aiming for 400whp out of the TypeR.
Joined
Oct 14, 2015
Messages
3,640
Reaction score
2,769
Location
York PA USA
Car(s)
'17 Black CTR #4071, 16 MDX Tech
Country flag
If there was a poll to reply to, I'd do so...

That said. I don't think the car is for you. No offense meant - just with the wheels and suspension... coming from a Corolla... I just wonder how 'self trained' you may be to avoiding pot holes, curbs, etc, or how you'll adjust to it. It's a huge step forward in terms of how it rides. Same way I wouldn't recommend a Porsche 911 GT3 to someone who only ever rode skateboard but now suddenly needs to go fast...

Now, if you're up for it, go for it! I only say it because I've been driving big-wheeled Civic's around since about 2002 (some breaks in there for sure...) and even in my MDX I'm trained to avoid man hole covers, memorize road surfaces for pothole/manhole locations, look out for curbs, park far away from careless motorists & children, avoid passing on shoulders, etc etc. It's like I've been practicing for this car for years, so I'd hate to have you be disappointed if you jumped into it.

If you choose to go CTR, I'll support it and be happy for you! We'll all follow along and see what you do about winter, car care, and so on because we're all here to learn from one another.
 

Dicecube

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2016
Messages
807
Reaction score
398
Location
Canada
Car(s)
2016 Honda Civic Touring
Country flag
If you have to ask, then no
 
Last edited:

Nozomi135

Senior Member
First Name
Josh
Joined
Feb 23, 2017
Messages
138
Reaction score
114
Location
Moncton, NB. Canada
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Si (Modern Silver Metallic)
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
Up in Moncton, NB myself! Overall, I'd lean more on the Si, but I'm biased since I've had mine since the start of the month! I was originally considering a Type R but seemed more financially feasible to have an Si instead for the moment (Paying 366 a month for 7 years and 2k a year for insurance). The Si has a super light clutch, firm shifter that's pretty easy to live with, though as far as I've heard, the clutch and the shifter in the R is easy to live with as well, power wise, the Si has PLENTY enough to have fun with but by no means is overkill and still handles amazing! I wouldn't worry about getting used to driving stick, I used to be an automotive tech by trade, so only really used 1st and 2nd gear to get cars in the shop, my Si was my second car+first manual car, my first car being an automatic, 2007 Yaris, in the first 2-3 days I was comfortable cruising around, within the first 1-2 weeks I was rev matching comfortably, now at the end of the month, it's second nature/a reflex to me! Once you get the feel of the car it's like butter, hardest part of stick is figuring out where the clutch bites and getting it moving in 1st gear. My only complaint is the rev hang from 1st to 2nd, sometimes a bit hard to make a smooth shift unless you let the revs drop. The R is a ton of car and amazing overall, but the Si is a bit easier to live with given the amount of power, fuel economy, and some extra niceties such as the lanewatch cam etc. I say, follow your heart on what you want, it'll be your car and it can't be a purchase you regret or feel remorse towards, I lean towards the Si because it's fast enough, it's fun as heck but it's still very easy and more so financially friendly to live with on a daily basis! I'd recommend trying to find a friend or take some lessons to get the feel of manual driving, and to try to drive both an Si and Type R to see where your heart ends up set! Hope you end up happy with your purchase! :)
 

Night Fury

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2017
Messages
1,021
Reaction score
716
Location
Chicago
Car(s)
Black Type R
Country flag
Live in Toronto, Canada. Not much of a driver since my work/friends are close and all I've got is an automatic 2005 Corolla.
When the 2017 Civic was released I instantly fell in love with it's appearance. No matter the colour, those rear lights looks great and stand out among all the homogeneous vehicles on the streets these days. Then I discovered the CTR and it was the first car I've ever actually wanted to drive and show off. Every other vehicle just feels like a means to get from A to B. I've considered the BRZ for a while, but never pulled the trigger since it didn't feel like a good daily driver. The CTR on the other hand has 4 doors, cargo space, more performance, and FWD for some extra stability on the snow/ice.
I'm not a huge racing fan or a car enthusiast. I'm simply a guy that fell in love with a high performance vehicle. Now the question: is it worth getting one?
I've never driven manual, nor do I know anyone with a manual transmission vehicle to lend me. I am planning to take some lessons just to get some experience, but I don't know if it's a good idea to jump into the deep end by making my first manual a CTR. I also don't know if I could live with driving stick in the city. I live in the suburbs so it's not as bad as downtown, but it's certainly not a country road. It would also be my only car as I'd get rid of the Corolla.Financially it's a bit tough to swallow considering I'd also need to get 18 inch rims and two sets of tires for summer/winter in Toronto (shipping over the border from Tire Rack is hella pricy!), but it's not the end of the world. Mostly I'm just worried that I might be paying for a lot of performance that never gets truly appreciated given my driving background and life style. I've thought about grabbing a cheap manual car for 2 years until the 2019 update, but selling an old manual is going to be tough so maybe it would be better to just toss that money directly into the CTR now?
So, would anyone here have any advice for me in my current situation? Am I barking up the wrong tree?
First, Please ask yourself:

  • Can you keep up with the payment?
  • Can you get the winter tires?
  • Do you have a safe place to park the car?


If you can get 2 out of these 3, then get the Type R, for a couple of reasons:

-You like it & that’s important.

-You don’t drive that much.

-You can learn to drive stick & take to the track, meets, etc.

-You get rid of your old car.

In Canada so far, I have read there will not be that many, if Honda keeps its word, your car in the future might have some resale value & that’s I bet you be better than some other vehicles.


Me as owner(Feedback): this car is very visceral & it only can be compared to a modified vehicle (similar feel), but the beauty on the CTR is that it already comes from factory as is.

Other options: Consider the SI as third option & the Golf R as second (this later is more suitable for you right now) Auto/AWD & All-season tires.


Hope this helps :thumbsup:
 

totopo

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
346
Reaction score
299
Location
CA
Car(s)
'17 Civic Ex Hatch, 370z
Country flag
Man, why do people treat the new type R like some raw track prepped GT4 or something. It's not even anything like the old ITR/CTR (hand finished engine, limited release, no creature comforts).

It's a freaking $33k hot hatch. with 4 doors and a huge trunk and ac. In a few years when OP is ready to buy it probably will be well under MSRP like any other civic. Hopefully in a few years, demand will have slowed and dealers will actually test drive the car so you can make up your own mind.
 

17CivicTypeR_Brian

Aiming for 400whp out of the TypeR.
Joined
Oct 14, 2015
Messages
3,640
Reaction score
2,769
Location
York PA USA
Car(s)
'17 Black CTR #4071, 16 MDX Tech
Country flag
Man, why do people treat the new type R like some raw track prepped GT4 or something. It's not even anything like the old ITR/CTR (hand finished engine, limited release, no creature comforts).

It's a freaking $33k hot hatch. with 4 doors and a huge trunk and ac. In a few years when OP is ready to buy it probably will be well under MSRP like any other civic. Hopefully in a few years, demand will have slowed and dealers will actually test drive the car so you can make up your own mind.
Primarily because of the wheels and tires. The tires are not suitable for winter at all, and the wheels are not easy to live with if you're new to the low profile scene. If you want a car you can just buy and drive any time of year, the CTR is not exactly that. You'll need different tires at a minimum (north of 40°N at least), and most of us would probably recommend a smaller diameter wheel & tire package for the winter setup. The body parts are a little harder to get and a little more easy to damage since they're a bit closer to the ground. The seats are awesome, but best if you just get in and stay in. Not easy/fun to get in and out often. Nothing is stopping a person from buying the car and treating it like a normal car - it is a Civic and it will be quite reliable for a long time. For now, it gets a lot of attention and gawkers which could be something to take into consideration-
 

Advertisement












Advertisement


Top