If you could do it all over again: would you buy another Honda?

Radioman1030

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Never understood the appeal of the Acura lineup
I agree completely, pay more for the vehicle and the maintenance just to get what is a Honda in the rest of the world. The way I see it, you by a Honda to impress you and you buy an Acura to impress your neighbors.



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Farcry1010

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I stumbled upon this website because I am in the market for a good quality car to replace my 2005 Mazda3. I am considering the Honda Civic. My Mazda3 is the first car I have ever owned that had very little maintenance costs. It was made in Japan. Gas mileage was never good but I also don't drive much either. My Mazda has a puny 60,000 miles on it at the moment. The car needs some minor repairs and it's solely a point A to B car. My wife has a newer 2014 Mazda3 which I am not impressed at all about. Mazda doesn't care about much what the consumer or driver wants. They've lagged many many generations behind in terms of entertainment tech. I also don't like the way the new Mazdas drive and they are rather costly now. They come standard with with large 17, 18 inch tires. The car's blind spots are troublesome for me whenever I take it out for drive.

I used to have a 1989 Honda Civic, brand new. It was a genuine lemon. I also used to work in the service department for a few years at a Honda dealership. My experience with Honda cars has not been very good. In particular, I've had chronic issues with Honda's transmission and brakes. Over the years, I have seen, experienced and known many people who complain the most about two things with Honda vehicles: Honda brakes and Honda transmissions. I talked several months back to old friends and colleagues who tell me these two issues are still present.

I would like to consider getting a 2017 Honda Civic CVT. I am getting up there in age and driving a manual in the city is not for me. I like what the Civic has to offer. However, I am worried about the longevity and the lifecycle of the rotors. it's really tricky business selling rebuilt/remanufactured transmissions. That's what Honda now does, that's what they did then. My Japanese trained mechanic (now retired) hated those rebuilt tranny's from Honda, but he said when he retired, they have improved but still not "good". It goes without saying transmissions are expensive but once you replace them, they seem to have a short life cycle and the vehicle becomes a money pit. When I worked for Honda, people would regularly complain about pulsating brakes and other brake issues with their Honda.

With my Mazda3, the front rotors and pads have lasted me to 50K. I still have original brakes in the rear. Talk about reliability. Aside from routine maintenance such as fluid changes, the odd engine mount which was under $100 outside of warranty, my Mazda was very low on maintenance.

So in part, my question to all you Honda owners here is would you buy another Honda, has it been reliable for you and should the CVT transmission be concern for someone who plans to keep their car a long time and who wants to have minimal maintenance costs?
Yes absolutely! Would do it again in a heartbeat.
You want maintenance cost but an Audi!!
I bought the Honda Warranty through Saccuchi Honda for $1,100 for 8 year 120,000 miles. So I don't have to worry about any major malfunction costs. But maintenance is maintenance. I don't know what you mean by that. I mean Hondas brakes I did on my wife's 2012 Accord where the fronts alone I got from Pep boys and I got the high carbon rotors and matching Platinum pads for $120 in parts for just the fronts. Other than brakes I don't know what other maintence costs that you would compare like windshield washer fluid and oil changes are cheap enough and very easy to do yourself. As long as people change there brakes properly (greasing slide pins and pad mounting areas and such as well as bleed out the brake fluid when you change the brakes. I even put a dial gauge on the rotor and I mount it so the least amount of r/o shows) they should last 30k-50k so as long as you are not a speed racer.
As far as running a cvt I am not worried. A lot of manufactures run them with no issues even Honda. Again so as long as your not a speed racer and not modding the engine to 200HP. Then you might have issues. If it's a daily driver expect it to last a very long time with minimal costs.
 

biker750guy

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I stumbled upon this website because I am in the market for a good quality car to replace my 2005 Mazda3. I am considering the Honda Civic. My Mazda3 is the first car I have ever owned that had very little maintenance costs. It was made in Japan. Gas mileage was never good but I also don't drive much either. My Mazda has a puny 60,000 miles on it at the moment. The car needs some minor repairs and it's solely a point A to B car. My wife has a newer 2014 Mazda3 which I am not impressed at all about. Mazda doesn't care about much what the consumer or driver wants. They've lagged many many generations behind in terms of entertainment tech. I also don't like the way the new Mazdas drive and they are rather costly now. They come standard with with large 17, 18 inch tires. The car's blind spots are troublesome for me whenever I take it out for drive.

I used to have a 1989 Honda Civic, brand new. It was a genuine lemon. I also used to work in the service department for a few years at a Honda dealership. My experience with Honda cars has not been very good. In particular, I've had chronic issues with Honda's transmission and brakes. Over the years, I have seen, experienced and known many people who complain the most about two things with Honda vehicles: Honda brakes and Honda transmissions. I talked several months back to old friends and colleagues who tell me these two issues are still present.

I would like to consider getting a 2017 Honda Civic CVT. I am getting up there in age and driving a manual in the city is not for me. I like what the Civic has to offer. However, I am worried about the longevity and the lifecycle of the rotors. it's really tricky business selling rebuilt/remanufactured transmissions. That's what Honda now does, that's what they did then. My Japanese trained mechanic (now retired) hated those rebuilt tranny's from Honda, but he said when he retired, they have improved but still not "good". It goes without saying transmissions are expensive but once you replace them, they seem to have a short life cycle and the vehicle becomes a money pit. When I worked for Honda, people would regularly complain about pulsating brakes and other brake issues with their Honda.

With my Mazda3, the front rotors and pads have lasted me to 50K. I still have original brakes in the rear. Talk about reliability. Aside from routine maintenance such as fluid changes, the odd engine mount which was under $100 outside of warranty, my Mazda was very low on maintenance.

So in part, my question to all you Honda owners here is would you buy another Honda, has it been reliable for you and should the CVT transmission be concern for someone who plans to keep their car a long time and who wants to have minimal maintenance costs?
You can not buy a better car than a Honda. CVT? The Toyota plant in Cambridge Ont. Canada is the highest quality plant in the Toyota world and also builds the Lexus, the first plant to do so outside Japan. Quality is a management function and I can not comment on the US Honda plant but the Canadian plant is top notch. 60,000 miles is nothing on a modern car; there are few vehicles produced that will require much maintenance by then. Drive a new Civic; I would be surprised if you didn't like it.
 

Gwjvw

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ZombieJerky

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Hondas? Yes I would. I don't have the years, but this is what I have owned since '88 and the approximate mileage I had on them when I traded/sold them:

  • Civic Hatchback 70k
  • CRX 60k
  • Prelude Gen3 110k
  • Passport (technically that year it was a Isuzu Rodeo) 40k
  • Prelude Gen4 80k
  • Odyssey 40k
  • Civic 4 door 170k
  • Civic EX-T (current) 6.8K

I have also owned a Mercedes C55, Toyota Prius, Isuzu Impulse (CRAP CAR!!), 2 Chrysler Town&Countries.

None of the cars (Honda or otherwise) have really ever given me problems (I have been lucky I guess), except the Isuzu and Chryslers. I would have to say though that the quality of build has only been beaten by the Mercedes. Price to value is unmatched. From talking to others that have owned Hondas, and I have heard this from others that have hundreds of thousands of miles on them... "Change the oil regularly and they run forever."

Though it should go without saying, I feel I need to usually put these on my posts for the people that are going to say "nuh uh, Hondas suck".... Standard disclaimer, this was my experience, your experiences may vary. ;)
 
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mjones5

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My first new car was a 1987 Accord Hatchback manual shift. Best car ever but was destroyed in a huge hail storm. I have had a Civic, CRV, and 2006 Pilot (178,000 miles) I just purchased a 2016 Accord Coupe V6-6 which the a/c was low on freon and they put dye in and we are in the wait and see mode. But I have a great relationship with the dealership and I looked at everything out there and came back to Honda. In 18 months or so I will trade both the Pilot and Accord for either a Civic Hatchback or the new CRV. I will decide at that time. But I have never been stranded by any Honda, and I take that Pilot on road trips with now worries. But I do all the maintenance exactly when required.
 

DarkTimber

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My family and I have been buying Hondas since 1976 (1st Gen Civic). I learned to drive MT on my father's 1976 Civic.

I went astray a few times: Subaru Impreza and Toyota Highlander. I only bought the Highlander because the Honda Pilot wasn't readily available since it had just launched.

I have never had a bad Honda. When my '84 CR-X had a slight gas spill on the side because a relative overfilled the tank, the paint bubbled. Honda fixed it for free without issue.

My current Honda is a '98 Civic HB MT. 18 years and still going strong.

Obviously, I have extremely limited experience with other car manufacturers.

Cars are now more about technology and software, therefore, my experiences do not necessarily apply to today's Hondas.

I am a long term buyer from a business based on 3 things: quality of the product, customer service and ROI (Return On Investment).

ROI - for X dollars, I expect the car to last me Y years with low maintenance costs for the first 100K. My '98 Civic cost $10,200 in 1998. It has always had low maintenance costs (175K) and lasted 18 years. It never left me stranded. My '98 Civic had an extremely high ROI. Higher ROI than any car I have owned.

No car company is perfect.
 

Squirrel

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I stumbled upon this website because I am in the market for a good quality car to replace my 2005 Mazda3. I am considering the Honda Civic. My Mazda3 is the first car I have ever owned that had very little maintenance costs. It was made in Japan. Gas mileage was never good but I also don't drive much either. My Mazda has a puny 60,000 miles on it at the moment. The car needs some minor repairs and it's solely a point A to B car. My wife has a newer 2014 Mazda3 which I am not impressed at all about. Mazda doesn't care about much what the consumer or driver wants. They've lagged many many generations behind in terms of entertainment tech. I also don't like the way the new Mazdas drive and they are rather costly now. They come standard with with large 17, 18 inch tires. The car's blind spots are troublesome for me whenever I take it out for drive.

I used to have a 1989 Honda Civic, brand new. It was a genuine lemon. I also used to work in the service department for a few years at a Honda dealership. My experience with Honda cars has not been very good. In particular, I've had chronic issues with Honda's transmission and brakes. Over the years, I have seen, experienced and known many people who complain the most about two things with Honda vehicles: Honda brakes and Honda transmissions. I talked several months back to old friends and colleagues who tell me these two issues are still present.

I would like to consider getting a 2017 Honda Civic CVT. I am getting up there in age and driving a manual in the city is not for me. I like what the Civic has to offer. However, I am worried about the longevity and the lifecycle of the rotors. it's really tricky business selling rebuilt/remanufactured transmissions. That's what Honda now does, that's what they did then. My Japanese trained mechanic (now retired) hated those rebuilt tranny's from Honda, but he said when he retired, they have improved but still not "good". It goes without saying transmissions are expensive but once you replace them, they seem to have a short life cycle and the vehicle becomes a money pit. When I worked for Honda, people would regularly complain about pulsating brakes and other brake issues with their Honda.

With my Mazda3, the front rotors and pads have lasted me to 50K. I still have original brakes in the rear. Talk about reliability. Aside from routine maintenance such as fluid changes, the odd engine mount which was under $100 outside of warranty, my Mazda was very low on maintenance.

So in part, my question to all you Honda owners here is would you buy another Honda, has it been reliable for you and should the CVT transmission be concern for someone who plans to keep their car a long time and who wants to have minimal maintenance costs?


Interestingly I just bought a Civic but the 2016 Mazda3 (along with the Corolla) were my choices I was looking at. I test drove the Mazda3 and it was nice and practically every site has the Mazda3 on the same level with the Civic. It's a little cheaper and the mileage is 31/40, same as the Civic.

Not suggesting buying a Civic or a Mazda, just pointing out how the Mazda3 is today.
 

Tsturbo

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I used to have a 1989 Honda Civic, brand new. It was a genuine lemon. I also used to work in the service department for a few years at a Honda dealership. My experience with Honda cars has not been very good. In particular, I've had chronic issues with Honda's transmission and brakes.

I would like to consider getting a 2017 Honda Civic CVT. I am getting up there in age and driving a manual in the city is not for me. I like what the Civic has to offer. However, I am worried about the longevity and the lifecycle of the rotors. it's really tricky business selling rebuilt/remanufactured transmissions. That's what Honda now does, that's what they did then. My Japanese trained mechanic (now retired) hated those rebuilt tranny's from Honda, but he said when he retired, they have improved but still not "good". It goes without saying transmissions are expensive but once you replace them, they seem to have a short life cycle and the vehicle becomes a money pit. When I worked for Honda, people would regularly complain about pulsating brakes and other brake issues with their Honda
Are you serious or are you a troll? Do expand on the rebuilt tranny from Honda which I have never heard of. Brake issue have never been a problem for me and all the Honda's I have owned. Do you change the brake fluid as recommended?

You worked at a dealership? Really?

I think you need to go buy a dodge, gm or ford, maybe a Yugo or a Daewoo, I have "heard" they are very reliable.

Yes, I would absolutely continue to buy Honda/Acura products.
 

StevenK

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Are you serious or are you a troll? Do expand on the rebuilt tranny from Honda which I have never heard of. Brake issue have never been a problem for me and all the Honda's I have owned. Do you change the brake fluid as recommended?

You worked at a dealership? Really?

I think you need to go buy a dodge, gm or ford, maybe a Yugo or a Daewoo, I have "heard" they are very reliable.

Yes, I would absolutely continue to buy Honda/Acura products.
350,000K miles on 97 2.2 CL, original transmission. (Same tranny as Accord). Still driving.
 

DavidJBrooks

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I've personally owned 10 Hondas (1982 Accord, 1983 Prelude, 1989 Prelude, 1990 Accord, 2002 Accord, 2004 TL, 2007 Accord, 2008 Pilot, 2009 TSX, 2012 Accord), had extensive experience with several more in my family and/or close friends who I helped out (1990 Prelude, 1984 CRX Si, 1984 Civic Sedan, 1986 Accord, 1990 Civic Si, 1989 Integra), as well as several other cars from other manufacturers (BMW, VW, Ford, GM, Mazda, Toyota) over nearly 30 years of driving. Both of my Preludes hit 200k, my 1990 Accord hit 300k, the Pilot is at 130k and my friend's Integra was over 400k last I checked.

Hands down, the Hondas have always - without question - been reliable and trouble free unless some nimrod screws with them (for instance, topping up the power steering fluid with ATF while the car is in for an oil change) or they aren't maintained properly (such as when my timing belt broke in my 1989 Prelude at 120k miles on the freeway at 90mph and seized up the engine).

One other thing that has been consistent across all of the Hondas, that I never had an issue with in any other car, is warped front rotors. I tend to brake late and brake hard, and the OEM discs are never up to it. Just something to keep in mind - it is not a "brake problem" by any stretch of the imagination.

I can speak ill of VW, Ford and GM, but the BMWs, Mazdas and Toyotas I've known of has been fine (although I've heard horror stories about BMWs). I can and do recommend Hondas every chance I get, because they are just that good.
 

Imagination04

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I've had a few Hondas in the 2000's and did not have any problems with any of them.

2003 Element: The first year that this model was available (at least in the USA). No issues and I did drive this car sort of hard considering its design.
2011 Insight LX: This car had a CVT and I had no issues with the tranny or anything else - just normal wear & tear and maintenance issues.
2016 Civic Coupe EX-T: Too new to me, but positive first impression. I obviously don't have a concern with buying a first year model or gen Honda.
 

DarkTimber

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How do you get any ROI on modern cars?
ROI is very subjective and personal. IMO: Length of time owning the vehicle without new car payments and low maintenance costs.

My '98 Civic HB cost $10,200 in 1998. It has had normal wear and tear things replaced. However, no repair coming close to the cost 2 month new car payment. If I had replaced it after 5 years, I would be at another 300-400/month car payment for 3-5 yrs. 15 years without a car payment and low maintenance costs IMO is a huge ROI. I do not consider it "modern" because it is 18 years old.

My '02 Highlander V6 AWD cost $34,000. ROI isn't as good. It cost a lot of money for the 90K scheduled maintenance (>$1,000). It just had to have its trans leak fixed which required dropping the trans to fix the leak (>$1,000).
 

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