Honda Sensing

a c i d.f l y

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ACC works amazingly well at high speeds, on long trips. It made my hour long transit down a 75mph free way a breeze, and the most pleasant driving experience I've had. With good road markings, LKAS also pretty much allows you to go hands off. Literally didn't have to touch the accelerator or brakes for an hour, both ways, with minimal steering. Definitely not something I would rely on for low speed, high traffic scenarios. Or when it's raining, or at night, though night time was fairly decent with good road markings and ACC still worked well at night.

All in all, I'm highly fond of ACC for that particular use. LKAS takes some getting used to, and having the car veer right when it's following the line on the right when there's a turn in lane can be pretty annoying, but again, seems best suited for long, straight transit. The lane divergence notification has made me painfully aware of how often I roll over the line, lol. 10th gen sedan has quite a different wheelbase and profile than my old 96 coupe!





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mis3

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Low speed highway driving is exactly what I was looking. Like I said before, I have to go through 30-40 minutes of highway driving in my work commutes where I would drive no more than 10-20 MPH.

I guess I will have to wait a few years so the technology can mature.
 
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d1zguy

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I have to say, for me at least, the low speed follow is the worst performing feature of the Sensing suite. If you are at speed, and the traffic ahead of you is stopping, Sensing will wait too long to apply the brakes. Then it will nearly slam the brakes on, causing the car behind you to panic break also.
Also, if the vehicle ahead of you is a lifted truck or semi-truck, then the sensors do not always detect the vehicle, causing you to suddenly accelerate into the truck. Terrifying to say the least.
That is because you may have air in your brake lines. I experienced the same issue. I bleed and re-bled all my brake lines and fitted some HAWK HPS pads up front. Now it's extremely smooth I don't even feel it. Without the vacuum assist the brake pedal doesn't even move before feeling like a brick. ol' gravity bleed method. Can't wait for Stainless steel lines and HAWK HPS pads for the rear.

Also keep in mind when you change brake pads or the car is new the brakes need to be bedded in before attempting to use ACC.
 

d1zguy

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ACC-LSF. I saved the "best" for last. I suspect it works really well on the 405 near Torrance where American Honda HQ is. But it can get you in trouble. Case: car ahead comes to a stop at a stop sign, LSF brings Civic to 1 MPH, car at stop sign proceeds. And it takes a really long time to figure out that the car it was following entered a L turn or R turn lane, or just plain turned. Conversely, on moderately curvy roads, it keeps seeing and losing "follow" on a car that is more or less the exact same distance in front the whole time. The thing that annoys me the most about it is that it has way too little filtering on the follow distance--it won't allow it to vary much at all--so, under the right conditions, it seems like it's gas/brake/gas/brake/gas/brake and is very annoying. If you were driving it, the follow distance might vary some more, but you'd never take your foot off the gas, just modulate it. Also, since it only sees one car in fornt, it makes no allowance for traffic conditions beyond that car. And one bug we've seen twice: car has been at an LSF STOP for several seconds or longer behind a stopped vehicle in front. Without my doing ANYTHING, car lurches forward and CMBS triggers. (So did I in both cases.)



It can only be set to target speeds in that range. If following, it'll do 1-25 MPH all day long.
This isn't exclusive to Honda sensing. This is not full autonomous mode. You still have to be alert of your surroundings.

The reason your car is brake, go, brake, go may be due to spongy brake and air in your rear brake calipers. Make sure you have no air ( don't bother with a dealer ) and fit some HAWK HPS pads up front it makes it extremely smooth.
 

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brake, go, brake, go may be due to spongy brake and air in your rear brake calipers
It's the filter design in the code, not air in the brakes. Air in the brakes would also mean a spongy pedal for me. It isn't. At all. They try to correct even minor increases or decreases in the follow distance way too quickly. I don't experience it the same, or my conditions are generally different, than @bhorn. I don't find it takes too long to slow down and then overcompensates. My typical case is small rise/small fall--undulating terrain. Car in front slows just a little starting up the rise. Civic brakes. Civic meet rise. Civic goes on the gas. Civic starts catching up. Civic brakes. Car in front speeds up slightly over the minor rise. Civic goes on the gas. Civic speeds up slightly going over the rise. Civic brakes. Ad nauseum. It's like being towed by a tow bar.
 

d1zguy

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It's the filter design in the code, not air in the brakes. Air in the brakes would also mean a spongy pedal for me. It isn't. At all. They try to correct even minor increases or decreases in the follow distance way too quickly. I don't experience it the same, or my conditions are generally different, than @bhorn. I don't find it takes too long to slow down and then overcompensates. My typical case is small rise/small fall--undulating terrain. Car in front slows just a little starting up the rise. Civic brakes. Civic meet rise. Civic goes on the gas. Civic starts catching up. Civic brakes. Car in front speeds up slightly over the minor rise. Civic goes on the gas. Civic speeds up slightly going over the rise. Civic brakes. Ad nauseum. It's like being towed by a tow bar.
Yes, I have experienced the different gradient terrains. it has it's good and bad days.
 

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I don't find it takes too long to slow down and then overcompensates.
I should have been a bit more clear about that specific use case. If you have ACC enabled @ 65 MPH, and there is not currently a car in the sensor range, and there is traffic ahead (again not in sensor range yet) travelling at say 35 MPH; then by the time the sensors acknowledge the car ahead, the brakes must be applied very heavily. I think the only way to remedy this would be installing a sensor with a longer range.

If you have a car in the sensor range and it slows down, then yes, ACC / LSF behaves as I would expect.
 

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That is because you may have air in your brake lines.
Nah, my brakes perform great when I press the pedal. We are talking about when the computer is in control. With the radio off and windows up I can hear the relays click to apply the brakes. By the time the car senses an object and the brakes are applied, it's too late to do so smoothly and heavy braking is required.
 

a c i d.f l y

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The "sensor" is an optical camera, so it makes sense with how it operates. If it were laser or infrared, or some other combination of other, more complicated sensors, it would be able to operate more effectively at a longer range. But as far as functionality to cost, it's cheap, and is effective enough for certain applications.
 

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The "sensor" is an optical camera, so it makes sense with how it operates. If it were laser or infrared, or some other combination of other, more complicated sensors, it would be able to operate more effectively at a longer range. But as far as functionality to cost, it's cheap, and is effective enough for certain applications.
There is a radar sensor in the bumper as well.
 

a c i d.f l y

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"Collision Mitigation Braking uses the camera behind the rearview mirror and an on-board millimeter wave radar sensor to determine the distance from the front of the vehicle to traffic ahead. The system has a max range of a little more than 100 yards."

Not the best range for the scenario described above, where you're going 80-90mph and run up to a standstill situation.
 

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ACC enabled @ 65 MPH, and there is not currently a car in the sensor range, and there is traffic ahead (again not in sensor range yet) travelling at say 35 MPH; then by the time the sensors acknowledge the car ahead, the brakes must be applied very heavily. I think the only way to remedy this would be installing a sensor with a longer range.
Understand. That's a very rare case here. It's pretty clear across the board that one way to make all this work better would involve better (read: more expensive) sensing capability. And greater sensor coverage probably increases exponentially the processing required to make sense of what's going on in that volume.
 
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"Collision Mitigation Braking ... where you're going 80-90mph and run up to a standstill situation.
Limited sensor range is probably one reason why CMBS is specifically stated as limited to 100 km/hr and below.
 
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And one bug we've seen twice: car has been at an LSF STOP for several seconds or longer behind a stopped vehicle in front. Without my doing ANYTHING, car lurches forward and CMBS triggers. (So did I in both cases.)
Yes, this has happened to me on several occasions also. Very frightening.
I realize I'm bumping an old thread but didn't feel this warranted a new thread.

I am having the quoted issue with my low speed follow (LSF) and am wondering how widespread it is. The problem occurs in a LSF situation in traffic where the car in front comes to a complete stop, causing the civic to also come to a complete stop. Then, occasionally, when the car in front moves, even if it's just inching forward a few feet at idle speed, the car lurches forward at essentially full throttle, then realizes it messed up and immediately engages the collision avoidance emergency braking.

This has happened to me many times and has actually caused me to stop using LSF in bad stop and go traffic. It's pretty frustrating and honestly can be anxiety-inducing. It messes with your head because sometimes the LSF works perfectly and creeps forward when the car in front does and other times it makes you look like a madman trying to ram the person in front of you. I'm surprised this hasn't been brought up as an issue more often because it could easily result in a rear end collision. I'm also disappointed because the LSF is one of the main reasons I decided to get a trim with Honda Sensing.
 

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I don't know how common it is. In both the cases I've had, the vehicle was in an LSF stopped state (i.e., not 0 mph for a half second or less or whatever the dwell is that makes the difference between LSF willing to start moving again if the vehicle in front moves, and it staying stopped). In one case I'm sure the vehicle ahead did not move. In the second case, I can't recall or didn't notice.

I've been half expecting a customer satisfaction campaign, if not a recall, to update code for this. Honda has to have at least some reports.
 

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