Honda Sensing - Stress Eliminator

Cincysports

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Hi All-

Just bought a Touring sedan this week and felt compelled to share my thoughts. These forums were amazing for general research and pricing strategy on the buying process. But even if I hadn't got a phenomenal deal I would still be sooo pleased with this car.

I have a 60 mile round trip work commute. About 45 of that is highway driving in varying degrees of congested traffic. Long story short it was an annoying and stressful drive.

Honda Sensing has changed all of that. I turn it on, dip into the second from right lane, set it at an appreciable speed relative to traffic, and coast.

Traffic slow down? No problem. Let Sensing handle it. Traffic jam? Just press the RES button when it's time to move again.

Most of the time I'm listening to a podcast with my hand lightly on the steering wheel while LKAS does the heavy lifting.

It's early tech but I think Sensing is a sign of great things to come and it's looking like a bright future!

PS - I love actual, fun, hands-on driving. And the Civic does this remarkably well too.





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VarmintCong

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I want it, but wish it came with the 6MT. I dont drive in traffic that much fortunately.
 

josby

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I couldn't agree more! I'm amazed at how much it transforms driving in heavy traffic from an annoying experience to no big deal (as long as you're not in a hurry). At the end of a long day at work, I just relax and let the ACC deal with the traffic on the way home. The LKAS makes things a little nicer too.

I had another car before with ACC but no low-speed follow (its ACC turned off at 20mph) and it was MUCH less useful. I'm really surprised the 2017 Accords still don't have low-speed follow.
 

unr1

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I turn it on, dip into the second from right lane, set it at an appreciable speed relative to traffic, and coast.
This is what I love about adaptive cruise control. First time I used it was in a Mercedes (it's called distronic plus) and I realized that it made me a more patient driver. With traditional cruise control, I had to constantly adjust my speed and if I was behind a slower vehicle I would become impatient.

With adaptive cruise, I just sit back, relax, and let the car do its thing. Of course I am still alert because if a car suddenly breaks in front or changes into my lane I have to be ready.
If I end up behind a slower car and I'm in no rush I just follow it and don't stress about it. And when I mean slower I mean it's going the speed limit! :p

I had another car before with ACC but no low-speed follow (its ACC turned off at 20mph) and it was MUCH less useful. I'm really surprised the 2017 Accords still don't have low-speed follow.
The accord is due for a full redesign in a year or two so expect several features in the Civic to be brought to it (ACC w/LSF and brake hold)
 

Dicecube

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That's what I miss about having a manual transmission: switch lanes, clutch, blip the throttle, downshift, punch the throttle and pass slow drivers with raw power and loads of torque. Take your adaptive cruise control stress reliever. Flooring the accelerator is a better stress reliever for me.
 

unr1

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Sure, that's fun

But when you have mile after mile on the highway you don't care for that after a while. It's only fun for a minute or two. Now on the twisties, yes, a manual is worth it.

In straight line (or slight curve) highway driving manual is just about as boring as CVT. Unless you're begging for a ticket.
 

VarmintCong

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That's what I miss about having a manual transmission: switch lanes, clutch, blip the throttle, downshift, punch the throttle and pass slow drivers with raw power and loads of torque. Take your adaptive cruise control stress reliever. Flooring the accelerator is a better stress reliever for me.
VW gives you both. No excuse not to offer Sensing with a manual. I wonder if the Si will have it?
 

neteng101

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VW gives you both. No excuse not to offer Sensing with a manual. I wonder if the Si will have it?
Kinda pointless - you can't do low speed follow because it can't shift the gears - so its mostly useful at highway speeds only. Better than no ACC, but the real gains is when it can bring the car to a full stop and move again in stop/go traffic.
 
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First time I used it was in a Mercedes (it's called distronic plus) and I realized that it made me a more patient driver. With traditional cruise control, I had to constantly adjust my speed and if I was behind a slower vehicle I would become impatient.
Agree completely. Added bonus is the great gas mileage that comes standard ;).
 

Eric29

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It's really not as good as I was hoping. My commute involves a winding road in the city, and ACC picks up cars in the other lanes constantly and puts the brakes on.

I find lanewatch also really disappointing. The scariest thing about it is that on a straight road in the country, it will show solid lines as I'm traveling straight. If the road starts to curve a little bit though, it will still show solid lines but drift right over the line and start to go to the shoulder.

It's interesting, but I think it needs a lot of work. If I were buying a car today, I'm not sure I would pay extra for it.
 
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Cincysports

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Eric I don't think it was designed to be used in city or country driving... maybe in the city with stop and go traffic. My experience is limited but it's been great on the highway so far.
 

Eric29

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Country driving is kind of like highway driving. It's 55 MPH on a pretty straight road. The disturbing part is that lanewatch says it is locked on, but it really isn't and you drift. If it's not locked on, it should show that it's not locked on.

Also, it seems as though it was made for city driving, stop and go traffic.

It is what it is. It's just that I see some people fretting about not having it, or wondering if they should get it. My point is that it's not all that it's cracked up to be. In fact, I find it pretty disappointing.



Eric I don't think it was designed to be used in city or country driving... maybe in the city with stop and go traffic. My experience is limited but it's been great on the highway so far.
 
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Cincysports

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It is what it is.
Never a truer statement. It's not an autonomous driving system and if you were expecting that when buying... :( I think we're still 10+ years away from set it and forget it driving.

But we're getting far afield from the point of my original post, which was that its working great (for me and some others) on annoying highway commutes.
 

unr1

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Country driving is kind of like highway driving. It's 55 MPH on a pretty straight road. The disturbing part is that lanewatch says it is locked on, but it really isn't and you drift. If it's not locked on, it should show that it's not locked on.
Are you referring to lane keep assist system (LKAS)? That shows when it's "locked on" with two parallel solid dashed lines on the dash. When it can't detect the lanes they no longer show as solid, only as hollow rectangle lines.

The lane watch system is the camera on the right side of the mirror. That can be activated with the right turn signal or by pressing the button at the end of the turn signal stalk.

Also, it seems as though it was made for city driving, stop and go traffic.

It is what it is. It's just that I see some people fretting about not having it, or wondering if they should get it. My point is that it's not all that it's cracked up to be. In fact, I find it pretty disappointing.
In the manual it says not to use it in heavy traffic or traffic with a lot of stop and go. I noticed that it's not as good as some other systems in stop and go traffic. But a lot has to do with learning how to use the system.
Often times I assist the system by hitting the gas and accelerating. Otherwise it takes too long to catch up to the car in front. Once I remove my foot from the gas, ACC will resume automatically.

I find the system far from disappointing but your results may vary. On highway driving it's very useful. And it can be in stop and go traffic too, depending on the situation.
 

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