HFP Drilled/Slotted Rotors

Empyrean

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1. the conti extreme contact sports which came out this past year, are better than the old michelin pss by far. you would need to compare the conti ecs to the new michelin ps4s but they dont come in smaller sizes. i've tested the conti ecs on a 550hp rwd car at autocross in near freezing temps in the rain, they're magical.
2. ebc greens dust heavily and wear quickly, but they are inexpensive. i've driven on hawk dtc30,60, blues, blacks, hps, hp+ , ebc green yellow red, porterfield r4s, gloc r6, r8, r10, carbotech bobcats, ax6, xp10, xp12, a bunch of wilwood compounds
4. dunno why you think im saying to run more negative rear, you should run more negative front camber
5. the si spring is no lower than the non si rear spring it does however have a higher spring rate to bring the rear spring frequency up. if you havent driven a fwd car with a lot of rear frequency, then you should try it before you comment on it.
Questions for 4 you mean I should have a stiller rear bar than front bar? And 5 what does having a higher rear spring frequency do exactly?





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ncrx

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Questions for 4 you mean I should have a stiller rear bar than front bar? And 5 what does having a higher rear spring frequency do exactly?
yes you should still run a stiffer rear bar typically on a fwd setup, of course you can go too big and lift off oversteer in emergency situations will often result in a spin. in a performance driving situation, track/autox/ this isnt a concern.

The front and rear will bounce at different frequencies. The reason the front and rear have different ride frequencies is to reduce the pitch of the vehicle over bumps. With the rear freq higher than the front, so that after hitting a bump, the rear will “catch up” with the front, and the front and rear will move together. This also means in roll the rear moves much quicker than the roll in front, in combination with the large bar, reducing understeer.

if you look at the base civic, vs touring, vs si, you can see how honda is tuning their suspension. They're adding front spring and bar for response and roll resistance due to lack of camber, and upping rear spring frequency and rear roll resistance by a lot. Of course being an oem setup, it will still push for safety reasons. Adding a larger civic r rear bar will increase rear roll resistance reducing understeer, but at risk of spinning in lift off situations.

base
Front Spring 126.83
Rear Spring 158.53
Front Sway bar 25.5mm x 4.0
Rear Sway bar 16.5mm

touring
Front Spring 134.75
Rear Spring 158.16
Front Sway bar 26.5mm x 4.5mm
Rear Sway bar 17mm

si
Front Spring 144.186
Rear Spring 208.776
Front Sway bar 27.0mm x 4.5mm
Rear Sway bar 18mm
 

Empyrean

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yes you should still run a stiffer rear bar typically on a fwd setup, of course you can go too big and lift off oversteer in emergency situations will often result in a spin. in a performance driving situation, track/autox/ this isnt a concern.

The front and rear will bounce at different frequencies. The reason the front and rear have different ride frequencies is to reduce the pitch of the vehicle over bumps. With the rear freq higher than the front, so that after hitting a bump, the rear will “catch up” with the front, and the front and rear will move together. This also means in roll the rear moves much quicker than the roll in front, in combination with the large bar, reducing understeer.

if you look at the base civic, vs touring, vs si, you can see how honda is tuning their suspension. They're adding front spring and bar for response and roll resistance due to lack of camber, and upping rear spring frequency and rear roll resistance by a lot. Of course being an oem setup, it will still push for safety reasons. Adding a larger civic r rear bar will increase rear roll resistance reducing understeer, but at risk of spinning in lift off situations.

base
Front Spring 126.83
Rear Spring 158.53
Front Sway bar 25.5mm x 4.0
Rear Sway bar 16.5mm

touring
Front Spring 134.75
Rear Spring 158.16
Front Sway bar 26.5mm x 4.5mm
Rear Sway bar 17mm

si
Front Spring 144.186
Rear Spring 208.776
Front Sway bar 27.0mm x 4.5mm
Rear Sway bar 18mm
Thanks for the explanation, even if it still went over my head a little haha
 

Syntek

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gonna bump this, but would these fit on the sedan?
 

Multaq

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gonna bump this, but would these fit on the sedan?

Yes all of the 2016-2018 Civics Use the same exact brake rotors and pads. You can even put regular sedan pads on the CTR :)
 

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