First Civic - 2018 Civic SI Sedan

dc2turbo

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Chester County. Picked mine up from Roberts in Downingtown. I used the true car app to get quotes from all the local dealers and beat them down from there.
ohhh, guess western PA(pittsburgh) is a bit cheaper. They are going for under 23k before tax





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Birdman75

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ohhh, guess western PA(pittsburgh) is a bit cheaper. They are going for under 23k before tax
Not a bad deal out there compared to mine. I had to walk out to get them down from 24.4
 

10GenPearlSi

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Firstly, welcome to the family! Be sure to make one of these and show off your car!


I still have fairly elementary knowledge of car inner workings, so this kinda confuses me. Can hard throttle input at low RPM actually cause the two plates to go out of sync? I always assumed "clutch slip" only happened when you make a mistake rev-matching.
The reason cars have clutches is that in normal operation in changing gears the clutch can slip for a short while to make smoother applications of power and rev match to the new gear. Clutches are designed to slip. The slipping that you have been reading about is large amounts of slipping at very high torque levels. The highest torque happens in the middle of the power band. That makes the Civic so much fun to drive, but if you go full throttle in the lower end of the power band then you can have very high stress levels on your engine and clutch. If overdone with too much boost, the clutch can quit connecting the engine with the transmission and start major slipping. That prolonged slipping can heat up the flywheel and cause the steel to glaze over. Then the clutch and flywheel need to be replaced. Just once or twice probably wouldn't destroy a flywheel, but repeated torture could.

http://blog.vittuned.com/the-10th-gen-civic-si-basemaps/

Here is a link where Vittuned tested the base tunes of Hondata and Ktuner. The +6 tune is the second one down. As you can see the highest torque is around 3500 rpm and the highest horsepower is around 5600 rpm. That 3500 torque is getting close to the maximum that most stock clutches can hold. These curves are generated at full throttle so 2/3 throttle at 3500 rpm wouldn't have near that much torque. Staying away from full throttle near 3500 is a blessing to your clutch. It would be much better to be a bit higher on the power band and you would have more horsepower to boot! That is why if you were at 3000 rpm on the freeway and went full throttle to pass you would not be kind to your clutch. Shifting down a gear or two to get above 4000 rpm would give you more power to pass. In the lower gears the strain on the clutch isn't as much due to the high leverage a low gear can give, so full throttle at 3500 is not a problem.
 

jakabony

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ohhh, guess western PA(pittsburgh) is a bit cheaper. They are going for under 23k before tax
I got my 2017 Si sedan for $22,987 before tax back in June 2017 in western PA. I bought it from Valley Honda in Monroeville. I have gotten three cars from them, and Jason Flenniken always treats me right.
 

coopermidnight

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The reason cars have clutches is that in normal operation in changing gears the clutch can slip for a short while to make smoother applications of power and rev match to the new gear. Clutches are designed to slip. The slipping that you have been reading about is large amounts of slipping at very high torque levels. The highest torque happens in the middle of the power band. That makes the Civic so much fun to drive, but if you go full throttle in the lower end of the power band then you can have very high stress levels on your engine and clutch. If overdone with too much boost, the clutch can quit connecting the engine with the transmission and start major slipping. That prolonged slipping can heat up the flywheel and cause the steel to glaze over. Then the clutch and flywheel need to be replaced. Just once or twice probably wouldn't destroy a flywheel, but repeated torture could.

http://blog.vittuned.com/the-10th-gen-civic-si-basemaps/

Here is a link where Vittuned tested the base tunes of Hondata and Ktuner. The +6 tune is the second one down. As you can see the highest torque is around 3500 rpm and the highest horsepower is around 5600 rpm. That 3500 torque is getting close to the maximum that most stock clutches can hold. These curves are generated at full throttle so 2/3 throttle at 3500 rpm wouldn't have near that much torque. Staying away from full throttle near 3500 is a blessing to your clutch. It would be much better to be a bit higher on the power band and you would have more horsepower to boot! That is why if you were at 3000 rpm on the freeway and went full throttle to pass you would not be kind to your clutch. Shifting down a gear or two to get above 4000 rpm would give you more power to pass. In the lower gears the strain on the clutch isn't as much due to the high leverage a low gear can give, so full throttle at 3500 is not a problem.
Thanks for the lesson! I might have to change my driving habits a bit, but I don't go full throttle that often. I'm using the first version of this tune which I'm guessing my clutch will appreciate.
 

10GenPearlSi

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Thanks for the lesson! I might have to change my driving habits a bit, but I don't go full throttle that often. I'm using the first version of this tune which I'm guessing my clutch will appreciate.
I am using d1zguy's tune also. My car is still fairly new. This is the first week that my clutch is beginning to feel broken in. It was grabby before.
 

inertiadrifto86

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I am using d1zguy's tune also. My car is still fairly new. This is the first week that my clutch is beginning to feel broken in. It was grabby before.
If I may ask, how many miles did you have on your clutch before it began feeling broken in?
 

10GenPearlSi

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If I may ask, how many miles did you have on your clutch before it began feeling broken in?
It took about 1200 miles. It probably would have taken even more time, but I have been practicing slow launches from a stop while slipping the clutch to make a smoother launch. I went extra slow with extra slipping to get a better feel of the clutch. I used the technique I use in reverse of slow driving while slipping the clutch. I figured my technique would speed up automatically once I got an improved feel. I just noticed a couple of days after practicing how buttery smooth the clutch is now. It has been grabby since new. I think that the time it takes to break-in depends on the type of driving conditions and the technique of the driver.
 

inertiadrifto86

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It took about 1200 miles. It probably would have taken even more time, but I have been practicing slow launches from a stop while slipping the clutch to make a smoother launch. I went extra slow with extra slipping to get a better feel of the clutch. I used the technique I use in reverse of slow driving while slipping the clutch. I figured my technique would speed up automatically once I got an improved feel. I just noticed a couple of days after practicing how buttery smooth the clutch is now. It has been grabby since new. I think that the time it takes to break-in depends on the type of driving conditions and the technique of the driver.
This rings true, as I have just over 1300 miles on my Si and literally just yesterday spent about 15 minutes in a flat parking lot practicing slow clutch lifts in first from a dead stop. I figured I was imagining things but the clutch almost felt a tad smoother afterward. I wish I had spent more time doing this sooner, but didn't really think I needed to do it. Honestly the primary reasoning for me was to just get a feel for the clutch, as I also have felt it was a bit grabby. I figured 1300 miles was more than enough time for the clutch to break in, so I had just assumed that the clutch was grabby on this car.

I'll spend some more time practicing and hope the clutch smooths out more.
 

ActiveArch

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I want to better understand how you guys are trying to break in the clutch. When taking off slowly from a dead stop and releasing the clutch, how much throttle are you giving? Or are you guys not giving any throttle at all? I’ve only got 100mi on mine so far so if I can break it in more properly earlier on that’d be great.
 

dmitri

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A quick side question:
I personally have a set of Konig wheels that are about 10lbs lighter than stock, each.
Did you feel distinctly noticeable, "objective" difference in handling after that particular upgrade?
 

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