Fatherpain’s 2018 Type R

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fatherpain

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  • #31
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Doh got these codes tonight. Cleared or acknowledged them using the Autel. My car is not currently tuned.



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Have been getting these intermittently (maybe every few weeks since the Wagner Intercooler was installed and ACT sensor was modded... suspect a small vacuum leak. Will be testing for leaks soon.


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Picked up a Turbo Boost Leak Detector and an air compressor. Hopefully will find time to do so in the next few weeks.



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fatherpain

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  • #32
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It’s almost been (1) year of ownership, so dropped the car off to Polished Protection in Signal Hill for an annual maintenance service on the ceramic coating and PFF they applied.


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Was a little skeptical at first, not knowing what the service entailed, other than it was needed to maintain the warranty and it cost $210 with a yelp discount. Dropped it off at lunch, then it was ready for pickup (2) hours later.


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Was very pleased with the result. They did a thorough wash, claybarred the oxide spots off the car and re-applied a coat of Ceramic Pro. The car looks refreshed and shiny again.

Their PFF application guy wasn’t there so will have to bring the car back for a future warranty service appointment to have him address some areas under the hood where the PFF clear bra is lifting on the edges.


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Here is a close up of the rear surface. There used to be a lot of tiny oxide dots that could be seen up close. These were clay barred away during the service and a fresh ceramic coat applied.

I had picked up a clay bar a couple months ago to try myself...but was unsure whether it would damage and remove the ceramic. The polished protection technician said it’s ok to do so lightly.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #33
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Pulled the wheels to recheck the front rotors to make sure every fastener was tight. The holding Phillips screw on passenger side was a little loose so replaced it and added a 2nd screw to both rotors.

Noticed a bit of rust buildup on the dark blue face of the Girodisc hub. Wiped off as much as I could then found where it came from...

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The inside hub of the wheels. Hit it with a wire brush to knock off the corrosion. Checked tire pressure 35psi front. 33psi rear
 
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Changed transmission fluid to Amsoil Synchromesh @18,000 miles.

Tools needed
6mm crush washer
20mm crush washer for drain and fill plug
part#94109-2000

2.3 quarts transmission fluid of your choice
Ratchet with 3/8 extensions, long and short
Flat and Phillips Screwdriver
Funnel
10mm combo wrench
Drain catch pan
Rags
Cardboard
A means of safely raising the car

With the car raised, and oil undertray removed, started the ignition and got the engine to normal operating temperature then shut it off.

MtnBikeAZ1 posted a nice tutorial here: https://www.civicx.com/threads/diy-...e-and-are-they-different-by-model-year.36209/

Accessing the fill plug requires removal of the airbox and ECU (if have an Eventuri) so will need to also disconnect the battery terminals.

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Fill plug removal. Photo credit: MtnBikeAZ1


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Drain plug location


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Drain plug removal. A 3/8 extension fits both drain and fill plugs perfectly. Photo credit: MtnBikeAZ1


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Here is what the old transmission fluid looked like after 18k miles. Pretty dirty. Reinstall the drain plug with a new 20mm crush washer and add 2.2 to 2.3 quarts of new transmission fluid of your choice. CTR compatible.


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I would add to his instructions (because someone pointed it out to me) is the need to open the side check bolt and top off the fluid until it seeps back out... then you will be sure to have the 2.3 quarts the Type R is calling for. The side check bolt is a 10mm.


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The squirt tube is a perfect fit for the side check opening to top off until it seeps back out. It also has a smaller tip extension and I switched to that towards the end. There are similar ones for sale on Amazon.


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Topped off the transmission fluid until it started to drain back out..then reinstalled the check plug. Though a new 6mm crush washer is preferred, I re-used the old one, as it’s on the side and not as critical as the drain plug. I’ve since re-checked and no leaks.


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This is the amount that went in. I’d estimate about 0.1 L. Was expecting to use the entire 0.3L but that was it. I might try topping it off again in a few days to make sure.

The plastic tip extension is pictured.
 
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Iilac

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Would you be able to fill up the fluid through the fluid check opening instead of the top fill point?
 
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  • #36
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Added the Acuity throttle pedal spacer, about a month ago. Started it off on position “B”, but have since changed it to position “C”.

Have watched a couple videos, but I don’t know how to heel-toe yet and there doesn’t seem to be much need just doing the daily drive around town.


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It’s a beautiful piece of hardware for sure and seems well made.


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Acuity’s install instructions were pretty straightforward and they also have a video which helped.


Install guide


Install video


The install took maybe 15 minutes, but it sure was a pita to twist and contort to reach the pedal fasteners, even with the seat moved all the way back and using a long socket extension. In hindsight it probably would have been much easier if had raised the car... but installed this during a break at work and didn’t have my lift, heh.


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This is position “B”. Throttle is pretty much flush with the brake pedal and close to it. Thinking this is probably the ideal setting for heel-toeing.


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As previously stated, I’m currently on position “C”.
Throttle is a tad lower than the brake pedal.
Can’t say it’s a huge difference like when changing to Acuity’s full shifter...then again I’m not heel-toeing yet. If ever get to that level of driving, probably will really appreciate having this mod.
 
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Hello lilac,
Good question...yes one could, however the process may take a really long time to refill 2.3 quarts through the check bolt opening. I wondered the same until actually performing the top off.

The squeeze bottle tube diameter is really small so it probably would be slow going. One would have to also stop to refill the squirt tube bottle each time it got empty + it would require being under the car for a long time.

That said...if there were a larger diameter tube and fitting that could be threaded into the check bolt opening, with a higher fluid capacity, then that could work, but the car would also need to be level and would need a way to vent it with the fill plug closed.

Removing the airbox to gain access isn’t too difficult with the proper tools. The toughest part of the transmission fluid change was breaking the top fill plug loose. Mine was excessively tight from the factory, so recall needing an extension to increase leverage.

Would you be able to fill up the fluid through the fluid check opening instead of the top fill point?
 
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fatherpain

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Thank you for the kind words Blue18SI, I am glad to see fellow civic owners are enjoying these posts.

I’m approaching (1) year of CTR ownership and have been a forum member about as long. I’m really grateful to all the posters that share information here on civicx and also cool dudes like Boosted180sx and many others that have taken time to answer my n00b questions and help me along the way.

I consider myself to be mechanically inclined from working in a power plant, but had not previously worked on cars outside of oil and air filter changes.. so this has been a fun learning experience and become a hobby.

This thread is my way of thanking the community and sharing what I’ve learned from others and trial and error. It also serves as a quick reference for when I need to do things again, as my memory isn’t the best ;)


Love this thread man. Very detailed and informative. Keep it up :thumbsup: love the car.
 
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Here is a belated tip pertaining to the Radium Oil Catch Can install for anyone considering this mod. At this point, I consider the PCV catch can (Radium or Mishimoto) a must have and the CCV version if tracking or driving your car hard. The CCV did capture oil when I went to the track.

Sharing how to make a potentially hard job very easy. This can be applied to any situation that involves installing a rubber hose to a tight fitting hose barb:

Radium’s hoses do not come pre-assembled... you need to install to the rubber hoses onto the hose barbs and Radium’s instructions say it takes a lot of force. This can prove difficult if you do not possess he-man strength in your hands. I certainly don’t, lol.

Bshatto3111 posted a terrific install video but he wasn’t able to seat the hoses all the way down on the barbs. Please also note in the video the PCV catch can hoses are routed to the opposite location of where they supposed to connect to. Radium tech support says it’s not a big deal, the catch can will still function the same, just the air flow will be reversed. Bshatto3111 is aware and intends to update his video at some future date. That said, his instructions are excellent and really helped with the install.

Radium dual oil catch install video. Credit Bshatto3111

To do this you need:
a bench vise
a heat gun or pot of boiling water
Gloves
Kroil or any other lubricant.

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First place the fitting in the vice, with a softener surrounding it so it does not mar. Tighten it... but not too tight to warp it. Spray hose barb with aerokroil. This will help the hose slide on


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Barbed fitting is lubed and ready


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Now use the heat gun to heat the end of the rubber hose you want to install. It’s a good idea to heat a little extra beyond just the depth the fitting barb will engage. Apply heat for about 1-2 minutes evenly around the hose...I recently read someone placed their hose ends in a pot of boiling water, so can do that in lieu of a heat gun ;)


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Like this. Heat makes the rubber expand and become pliable. Can heat longer if like, just don’t make it melt or smoke.


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Now shove the warmed up hose onto the barb. Be sure to wear gloves so you don’t burn your hands. Slides on like butter!


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Perfect. Hose is fully engaged. No gap.


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Hoses done. Ready to measure, cut and install.


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Correct PCV hose routing
 
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fatherpain

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As mentioned previously, I’ve been getting a check engine light intermittently. Never a fun thing.
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fortunately it’s just been a nuisance level thing so far... I hope, lol


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Plugged in the Autel and it’s saying it’s an idle RPM issue...


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Which I can confirm as every now and then, the engine revs and cycles between 1.2k to 1.4k RPM at idle...


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When it should be idling at about 800 rpm


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This issue did not occur until after replacing the intercooler and performing the ACT Sensor Mod. Suspecting a vacuum leak is the cause, however it did not appear immediately after the install so that’s a bit puzzling. It is a semi regular occurrence now.


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Picked up one of these Turbo Boost Leak Testers. The CTR calls for 2.75”.

The next few posts will be related to testing the system for leaks. However will cover related items needed to get there such as:

Disconnecting the battery.
ECU removal
Disassembly of Eventuri airbox to access the inlet pipe where the tester connects to.
Removing the front fake vents to access the intercooler connections.

Really hoping it’s a simple vacuum leak. Otherwise will have to dig a little deeper on the list of probable causes.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #42
Battery and ECU removal. This was the first thing I learned to do on the CTR. My pal Boosted180sx walked me through this via text the first time.. I’ve since performed this task about a dozen times so I feel like an old pro, lol


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using a 10mm socket and ratchet, first loosen the negative terminal then remove from the post and set aside so it’s no longer touching.


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Lift the red plastic cap and do the same for the positive terminal. When reconnecting the battery, reinstall in reverse order. Positive first.


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Here is the ECU. There are (4) plastic clips that hold the plastic cover in place.


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Gently remove the cover and set aside


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This will expose the (2) electrical connectors that are held in place by plastic levers. Lift and turn back this lever.


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Turn it all the way then the connector will be free to lift out.


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Like this. Set it aside.


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Do the same for the other connector


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There are (2) bolts securing the ECU in place. Here is one of them.


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Use a 10mm socket, extension and ratchet to remove. **beware** it is very easy to drop this bolt once it’s loose. If you’re lucky it will drop to the ground or land at a spot where it can be seen and retrieved using a telescopic magnet. If unlucky, it will fall all the way down to the undercarriage and the car will need to be raised so the splash shield can be removed to retrieve it. Have had this happen a couple times.


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Now remove the second bolt securing the ECU


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Before lifting the ECU, this plastic clip securing wiring must be removed. Needle nose pliers works well to squeeze and disengage it.


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Like this.


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With the wiring free and both bolts removed, the ECU can be removed and set aside.


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ECU fully removed. To reinstall just do these steps in reverse order. When starting the car again for the first time, there will be a bunch of weird messages that are scary at first but they will go away once the car is driven a little while and you stop and restart the car.
 
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Again the goal is to gain access to the intake pipe to perform a boost leak test. Cleaning the air filter is a secondary task.

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With the ECU out of the way, the Eventuri airbox can be disassembled. Remove the (4) bolts securing the side lid using either a 5mm Allen wrench or hex bit socket. I keep these tightened just hand tight so not to crack the carbon fiber lid.


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A hex bit socket works well for the lower bolts.


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With all bolts out the lid can be removed.


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With the side lid removed, can reach in to disconnect the MAF sensor and wire holding clip.


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MAF Sensor disconnected


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Now use a 10mm socket and ratchet to loosen all of the hose clamps securing the silicone hose and filter piping.


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A little helper is nice to have for this part ;)


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With all hose clamps loose, remove the filter piping. Kroil or some other type of penetrating lubricant works well to help break it free from the intake hose.


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Now loosen the hose clamp holding the filter in place.


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With the air filter completely removed it’s a good time to clean it out using a compressed air nozzle. When blowing the dust out, I’m using both hands. Only using one here to take a photo. Be sure to wear eye protection.


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Spread the filter ribbing to make sure all the dingleberries are blown out.

For reinstallation, simply reverse this process.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #44
Alright. With the airbox and silicone intake hose removed the intake piping is now fully exposed.
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This is where the Turbo Boost Leak Detector will connect to pressurize the system.


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***IMPORTANT*** before pressure testing the system for boost/vacuum leaks, be sure to OPEN the oil fill cap. Removing the oil cap will ensure pressure will not build on the oil seals, ie. crank oil seal, camshaft and rear main oil seals, etc and damage your engine.

Again, failure to remove the oil cap may result in serious DAMAGE to your engine during the leak test!


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At this point I removed the plastic engine cover using a 10mm socket and ratchet.


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Picked up this air compressor from Amazon to run this test and to clean air filters and fill tires to proper inflation pressure. It’s a fairly quiet unit and has a built in regulator to control output pressure so that’s a plus. Build quality seems excellent. Happy so far with it.


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Also picked up some of this Oatey leak detector fluid from Home Depot. It’s just a soap solution that will produce bubbles on contact with pressurized air. I bet a water/dish soap mixture or bubble solution for kids would work also.


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Here is the Turbo Boost Leak Detector that is available on Amazon. Opted for this over another company’s offering, because this has a handy built-in pressure gauge. Quality of materials is also a plus.

As mentioned the CTR takes a 2.75” hose connector.


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Assembly is straightforward. Thread the gauge in and install the supplied air input and tighten down the sealing gasket via this nut.


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The air input uses a standard tire inflator fitting, so picked up one of these at Autozone.


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Installed the aluminum cap to the hose adapter and tightened the supplied T-bolt hose clamp.


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Turbo Boost Leak Detector ready to rock! Besides being functional, the colors look great on this tool. Dave, the owner of Turbo Boost Leak Detector is a hardcore gear head and loves the Type R. He walked me through the boost leak check process. Gotta love excellent customer service ;)


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Here is the tire inflator adapter connected to the air nozzle.
 
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  • #45
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Connected the Turbo Boost Leak Detector to the inlet pipe and tightened the T-bolt clamp. Zero pressure. Verified oil fill cap is OPEN.


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Pinched these (2) vacuum hoses off using these green spring clamps. This is needed so the compressed air will not bleed off and be able to build pressure.

Double checked everything. Ready to begin the leak test. Regulator on the air compressor is fully backed out (set to zero pressure) to avoid any chance of an overpressure surge that could damage the engine.


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Used another green clamp to keep the air nozzle trigger pulled. Had the leak detector solution ready. Dialed the regulator slowly to obtain around 20-22 psi.


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Gauge is very easy to read.


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Found one big leak right off the bat. Was audible at 16-20 psi. Probably the main culprit generating that CEL. Applied some Oatey solution and it bubbled everywhere.


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Found I had forgotten to reinstall the spring hose clamp when the Radium CCV oil catch can was installed *bonk* heh.


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Putting the clamp back where it belonged solved that problem.


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Found a second decent sized leak on the Radium PCV catch can hose fitting that was apparently a little loose. Bubbles found here also. Tightened and solved that issue.


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Removed the vent panels by inserting fingers through the side holes and pushing the plastic outwards. There are several plastic clips that hold it in place.

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Carefully pry, push and pull and 90% of the vent will come out. However there is (1) black plastic plug that needs to be removed for the entire panel to come out. This plug is the same as what is found on the undercarriage.


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Here is the black plastic push pin to be removed so the vent can come out.


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Use a flat screwdriver to lift push pin head and pop it open.


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With the plastic push pin out, the entire vent can come out.


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With both front vents removed and car raised, was able to check all (4) Wagner intercooler connections.


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Noticed some really minuscule bubbles at (1) intercooler connection. The other (3) were fine.


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Here is a really cool tool I picked up from McMaster-Carr about (15) years ago, called “the palmster”. It’s a really compact ratcheting tool. Perfect for tight clearances such as this.


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Added a short extension and 5/16” socket to make the perfect tool for the job.


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Reached in and adjusted the position of the hose clamp, re-tightened and this leak stopped also.


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No more bubbles ;) and that proved to be a successful system boost leak test. Found and addressed (3) vacuum leaks using the Turbo Boost Leak Detector, an air compressor and some clamps. Overall very pleased with the purchase and hopefully the vacuum leak repairs will resolve the high RPM @idle issue and P0507 emissions trouble CEL I’ve been experiencing. All that’s left now is to put everything back together. With the boost leaks fixed, wondering whether I might have gained a few HP under WOT, lol.

***update*** HP certainly did increase.. stock wheels and tires are spinning in 3rd gear, without trying too hard.

Also for those without an air compressor, a bicycle tire pump would also work as an air source.


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A side benefit of pressurizing the system was to check operation of the valved exhaust on the Sequence which is set to open at 7psi.
 
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