Fatherpain’s 2018 Type R

OrchidFc3

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The carbon fender flairs seem to fit decent! I was thinking on getting a set for mine. Looks really good on the CW, not sure if it's worth buying for CBP they won't pop as much.



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fatherpain

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  • #392
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Not much progress on the Type R front today, but slapped the bumper back on my wife’s 2004 Toyota RAV4 to complete that mini restoration project.... here is her car before I started. Old yellow headlights and a broken fog. Original hood and roof paint was blistering badly. Interior was ultra gross.


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Here is her car today. Pictures don’t really do it justice.....Hood and roof repainted by Beto’s. Same shop that did the J’s Racing hood and grill. New headlights and fogs. Almost the entire Interior was gutted and replaced. Old carpet and seats thrown out. Now has a nice set of leather seats from pick-a-part. All parts that have gone missing or broken over the years were also replaced. The rest of the original paint was in pretty good shape so left it as-is. Body is surprisingly straight, considering how my wife drives, 😂


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Was a fun project to do. I’ll never allow my Type R to get in the condition my wife’s car deteriorated to 🤣 Though, now I’m inspired to restore my 1996 Accord, at some point :doh:

That said, it will be interesting to see FK8’s being restored 15 years from now, 😆


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Back to Type R related stuff, the PWR premium race radiator, in black, arrived today. It seems substantially heavier than both the OEM and Koyorad cores.
 

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That radiator is gorgeous... you and @Lust need to hurry up and tell us how much better cooling is on the track 🤣

First time posting on your thread, so THANK YOU for all the details on your build. Great info!
 
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fatherpain

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Wanted to replace the (2) studs that are threaded into the turbo housing with Rampage ti hardware as part of the downpipe install.... attempted to remove the top one and ran into problems.


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Used my handy dandy heating/cooling/kroil technique and the stud initially moved and backed out several turns. Then it got really hard. Tried heating and cooling several times and couldn’t get it. Would have snapped if applied any more pressure....

Gave up and attempted to remove the nuts, but the inner nut would not come off.


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Used a grinder and cut off wheel and carefully chopped up the nut In several places, without touching the stud, so it could be safely removed.


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Just went deep enough to see the threads then stopped.


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And made several cuts to weaken the nut. Used a large flathead screwdriver to pry the nut fragments apart.


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Until all that was left was this.


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Nut successfully removed.


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Fortunately, there enough good threads remaining to reuse the stud. Dunno why it galled so badly. In hindsight, should have applied anti-seize before trying to back the studs out. Ah well.


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Thought a washer would be needed to provide space to reach the good threads but turned out not needed. Dodged a bullet, 😂

Really want to add the Rampage hardware.... but to do so now, would need to pull the turbo and machine the studs out and dress the threads... on the fence whether it’s worth the trouble. :doh:
 

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You think the threads in the turbo housing are bad? Even if they are, you could either re-tap to clean up the threads with the same diameter/pitch as the stud (without removing the turbo), or you could step up one size diameter stud and re-tap in with keeping the turbo attached as well. I wouldn't trust a helicoil, but I would trust a time sert as another option?

I say all of this assuming you can get the stud out.
 
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fatherpain

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Internal threads on the turbo are probably dinged up abit. Couldn’t get the stud to return to its’ starting position...But it should be good to do its job.

Pretty certain at this point, the only way the top stud on the turbo housing closest to the engine is coming out is by cutting it flush, then drilling it out and using an extractor.....but there doesn’t seem to be enough room to do it in place with the tools I have, so likely would need to pull the turbo...

Nitroturtle provided feedback on his experience when removing the turbo and not seems like it could be a can of worms, so I probably will skip this, unless my nephew gives me a hand. Heh.


You think the threads in the turbo housing are bad? Even if they are, you could either re-tap to clean up the threads with the same diameter/pitch as the stud (without removing the turbo), or you could step up one size diameter stud and re-tap in with keeping the turbo attached as well. I wouldn't trust a helicoil, but I would trust a time sert as another option?

I say all of this assuming you can get the stud out.
 
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This round of mods are somewhat dependent on one another. For example, it was much easier to remove the front pipe with the down pipe out of the way.

The tear down sequence I followed was to remove:
  1. air charge pipe
  2. down pipe
  3. front pipe
  4. radiator​
To get to this point, first raised the car and removed:
  • Hood
  • Bumper
  • Disconnected battery
  • ECU
  • Air box
  • Variety of bolts, clips and electrical connectors.
These topics were covered on previous posts and can be found in the table of contents, so won’t repeat how to do these here.


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Disconnected the radiator retention frame and moved it to the side.


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Engine bay ready to be worked on. Let the radiator drain to a catch pan below.


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Used an Allen socket to remove the Radium CCV oil catch can tubing brackets. There is probably something to remove here, even if do not have this catch can.


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Used a 10mm wrench to remove these (2) bolts.


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And (2) bolts close to the engine.


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Unplugged this electrical connector to gain access to the last remaining bolts on the air charge pipe.


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There are (2) bolts at the bottom of the charge pipe that are reached using a deep socket or an extension.


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The innermost bolt can only be reached using a long extension and ratchet.


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With all the bolts removed, the charge pipe easily lifts out.


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Air charge pipe removed. Ordered a new gasket part # 17272-RPY-G01.

Awaiting delivery of an Eventuri CF inlet charge pipe and V2 MAF tube from Evasive. Have been waiting over (2) months. Hopefully it will arrive within the next (2) weeks, but not holding my breath :(
 
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fatherpain

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  • #398
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Next up was the removal of the down pipe. First disconnected the O2 sensor electrical connectors.


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Close up of the O2 sensor connectors.


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Removed the bracket holding the connectors using a 10mm wrench.


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Like this.


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Then removed the bracket and set aside.


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Next was the O2 sensor itself, but there is no way a regular socket would fit.


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Did some quick research and found a special O2 socket that has an opening to slide over the sensor wire was needed. Fortunately it is a common item at the auto parts store.


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The wrench fits over the O2 sensor like this.


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Then use a ratchet to loosen it.


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And out the O2 sensor comes. There is a 2nd sensor below that will come out with the


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The down pipe heat shield was next to come o


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There are (3) 12mm bolts to remove for i


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Including this one below, then use finesse to lift it off.


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Which exposes the infamous down pipe to turbo housing bolts which has resulted in numerous snapped bolts and studs.

Safe removal of these bolts and studs was previously covered here on post #387 so won’t repost. Please click that link if missed it.
Ran into problems trying to remove the studs mounted in the turbo housingHere is how I recovered. *whew*


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With the upper hardware removed, moved to the lower connection. There are (5) 14mm bolts to remove. Fortunately they come off much easier.


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When all the bolts are out, the front pipe will drop down a little. (I removed the front pipe bolting before reaching this step is why.)


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Down pipe was getting hung up on this bracket, so loosened it and rotated out of the way.


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Gently removed the down pipe and had to wiggle it out. Was careful not to damage anything.


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View of the engine bay with down pipe outta there.


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Down pipe removed. Just need to remove the lower O2 sensor and heat shield and transfer to the new down pipe :)
 
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fatherpain

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  • #399
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Front pipe removal (which shares a common joint with the down pipe). Sprayed kroil then undid these (5) fasteners. Used heat, but it wasn’t necessary. The fasteners came off very easily.


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Tools needed were a 14mm combo.


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And a 14mm deep socket and ratchet for this difficult to reach bolt and nut.


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Here is the other end of the front pipe where it connects to the exhaust. These fasteners also came off no problem.


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Undid all fasteners securing the heat shield above the exhaust, to permit movement so the front pipe could be maneuvered out.


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Pulled this rubber exhaust mount that attaches to the front pipe arm off of the black post.


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The front pipe could only be removed By jockeying it forward. Imagine it would be really difficult if the downpipe was still in the way.


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Front pipe just about out.


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Front pipe removed along with the down pipe.


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Here is the RV6 front pipe w/optional silver ceramic coating. Transferred the rubber exhaust mount from the OEM pipe.


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The RV6 front pipe comes with gaskets, a nice magnetic pickup tool and fasteners.


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Unfortunately, the supplied bolts are too short. 🤦


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Was a little tricky to install solo, but was doable. Started on the exhaust end. installed all (3) bolts and put the gasket over them. Held the gasket while connectIng to the exhaust. Wasted time with the RV6 hardware before realizing they were short, then reused the OEM fasteners and anti seize.


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This was the maximum thread engagement by the RV6 fasteners. Switched back to OEM hardware and left the joint and exhaust heat shield loose for now,. until the new down pipe is installed.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #400
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Installed thus Dream Automotive turbo oil return clam shell heat shield. This can only be installed with the down pipe out of the way.


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Confirmed with Dream that it goes here, around this rubber hose.


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There weren’t any instructions, so was perplexed as it was impossible to simply slide it on. Wouldn’t fit.

The options were to:
  1. pull one end of the hose off, but that looked like a major pain to get it off then back on..
  2. remove the bracket supporting the turbo housing to get more clearance.
My work motto is “smarter, not harder” so went with option 2. A 14mm socket is needed to undo the bolts.


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This Husky adjustable ratchet head is one of my favorite tools.


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Turbo support bracket removed.


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Turbo oil return line now accessible.


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The clam shell heat shield has sharp edges so used leather gloves to feed it in.


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Clam shell on, just needs to be folded and crimped shut.


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View from below looking up.


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Channel locks worked well to close the clam shell.


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While holding the clam shell shut, reached up with my free hand and used a long flat screwdriver to bend the tab over... then crimped it closed using a needle nose plier


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View from the top looking down. Closed the top joint also.


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Dream Automotive turbo oil return line clam shell heat shield installed and turbo support bracket back on :)

Not sure how much benefit it will be, because the rubber hose it is protecting is attached to an exposed metal tube directly above it, which cannot be seen... but every little bit helps.

Dream sent an email saying they will be coming out with an updated turbo oil return heat shield soon. :doh:
 
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fatherpain

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  • #403
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Removed the Koyorad in preparation for the PWR radiator upgrade and Dream Automotive down pipe install. So much easier the 2nd time around, knowing what to expect, but will recap anyways :)

At this point, the Koyorad had already been drained by removing the plug underneath and all the contents caught in a large catch pan. The radiator retaining bracket had also been released and set aside.

Removed these (2) screws securing the AC condenser to the radiator using a 10mm socket.


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There are (2) screws underneath that also need to come off from the AC condenser. No room for a socket, so a 10mm combination wrench is needed.

The AC condenser is flimsy and delicate, so be careful not to damage it once it’s detached and hanging there.


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Channel lock pliers work well to loosen and reposition the radiator hose clamps. I am switching to Acuity reverse flow silicone hoses, so pulled the top hose clamp at the engine.


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And the lower radiator hose clamp at the thermostat.


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Radiator hoses were holding tight, so gently pried the edges so kroil could penetrate and loosen them up.


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Both radiator hoses separated from the engine. Note the location of black thermostat where the lower hose came off.

My buddy boosted180sx cautioned against the use of a low temperature thermostat, due to increased engine wear, so keeping the OEM thermostat instead of switching to the J’s Racing T-stat.


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Under the car, this temperature sensor electrical connector pulls off and it’s easier to cut and replace this zip tie rather than trying to pull the plastic retaining clip.


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These fine tip cutters work well for this.


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Koyorad and stock radiator hoses lifted out.


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With the radiator out of the way, check out the extra space to work with. Will make the DP install easier. Especially for the Dream Automotive high flow cat, which may have the largest diameter on the market.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #404
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Side by side comparison PWR (left), Koyorad (right). About the same core thickness, however the PWR is more dense. Feels much heavier when handling it.

Lust just reported successfully tracking his car @97-104F ambient in the advanced group on his build thread here.

Super exciting results for him and for those that track their R’s! Kudos to Lust for researching PWR and sharing this key component to the Type R overheating solution for the track. Followed his lead after seeing his PWR post on the FB Type R Track page. :bow:



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Side rail comparison. PWR is has about 1/4” less material on each side...however is the same overall width.


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Fin comparison. The PWR has 110 columns of fins. Koyorad has 80.


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Side by side ready for the fan, temperature sensor and rubber feet transplant. The PWR comes with its own drain plug. Leaving the OEM hoses on the Koyorad.


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Acuity reverse flow silicone hoses loosely installed for a test fit. Transplants complete.



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PWR temporarily dropped into place. Perfect fit so far.


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Here is an excellent view of the thermostat (Black) and engine connector where the radiator hoses attach to. Opted to stay with the OEM thermostat instead of switching to the J’s low temp one.


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Attached the radiator hoses to the engine. Note can read the Acuity logo when hoses are connected to the correct ends.


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Acuity’s install guide says to make sure the hoses do not touch each other, like this.


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With the hose orientation verified, tightened the Acuity supplied hose clamp on top of the radiator. Did not tighten any of the engine connections because the radiator needed to come back out for fitment adjustment and it’s easier to install the down pipe with it out of the way.


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Tightened the lower hose clamp on the radiator.


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Checked the driver’s side. As expected, the radiator edge is very close to the Wagner Intercooler silicone hose. Marked the area To trim with a sharpie.


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Passenger side looked ok.


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Pulled the radiator back out and ground off about 3/16” from the frame edge. Was sure to cover all open connections so metal dust wouldn’t contaminate it. Wore PPE including a full face respirator.


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Adjustment made to ensure proper clearance from the intercooler hose.


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Used compressed air to blow away the metal dust. Note the bag covering the open hose connections.

Note the drain plug is on the bottom of the PWR radiator pointing down. Will need to cut an access hole in the plastic, when it’s installed.

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Installed a fresh zip tie to secure the temperature probe wiring when it’s time.
PWR radiator and Acuity reverse flow silicone hoses prepped and ready for final installation, once the down pipe is in :)
 
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  • #405
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Going to continue with the PWR race radiator install for continuity, though the down pipe went in first...

Sprayed the (2) rubber feet on the radiator and the recessed where they sit with kroil to make easier for them to slide in when positioning the radiator.


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With the radiator in checked the recesses from underneath to verify the rubber feet were fully seated.


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Reinstalled the (2) bolts securing the upper half of the AC condenser to the radiator using a 10mm socket.


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Went to install the (2) bottom bolts and the fitment to the AC condenser slots were slightly off.


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On both, enough to prevent the bolts from going in...


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There wasn’t room to use a hand file, so picked up a rotary file with a long shank. Ideally would have used it with a straight grinder, but all I had was this regular peanut style.


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Stuffed a paper towel between the AC condenser and radiator to provide a little space.... then bored the slot. Wore a faceshield, respirator, long sleeves and leather gloves as the rotary file throws off metal slivers and dust.


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Rotary files cut metal quickly so was careful just to hit the areas that needed widening.


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No problemo :cool: Slot (1) adjusted for proper fit.


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Same thing for slot (2).


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Installed the lower AC condenser bolts and tightened with a 10mm combo.


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Checked underneath to verify the adjustment to the driver’s side radiator bracket was enough to clear the intercooler hose, and it was plenty good


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Reconnected the thermocouple and secured with a zip tie.


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Went to check the drain plug closed and couldn’t find it... then remembered the drain is on the bottom of the PWR radiator, not Horizontal pointing back towards the engine like the OEM and Koyorad.

Had to cut a hole in the plastic frame to access it... so did it with the good old heated blade trick ;)


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Misjudged the location at first and cut to the left where it wasn’t needed :doh:. In a perfect world would have just cut enough for the drain access...Ah well.


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Drain plug uses a 5mm allen. Verified it was tight. Hopefully no leaks.


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Installed both Acuity hoses to the engine and tightened the hose clamps 1/2” away from the ends a 7mm socket.


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PWR premium race radiator installed. All that’s left is to put the radiator retaining bracket back on and fill the system. Will cover that soon on a future post.


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Another angle. Very excited about the PWR radiator, as Lust has proven it is the real deal and helps solve the track overheating issues.:bow:
 
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