Fatherpain’s 2018 Type R

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fatherpain

fatherpain

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  • #16
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Apply a light coat of brake and caliper grease to the backing plate and ends


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With grease and without.


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All set. My nephew said to take a little bit off so the pads have just a little bit less than what is shown here.


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The front pad drops right in


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the rear pad drops in with the wear indicator as shown.


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Both pads installed, ready for the caliper now


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A clearer pic, however this was post disaster, so the caliper is completely disconnected and removed.



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fatherpain

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  • #17
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make sure the brake fill cap is open and use the fluid extraction tool to remove brake fluid so no spills.


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Now is time to use the wind back tool, the backing plate and the K2 head


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K2 head has the (2) prongs to engage the piston.


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Assemble the tool by sliding the backing plate over the handle and putting the K2 head at the end. Install the tool to the caliper with the backing plate inside the caliper bracket like this, then thread the tool counterclockwise to touch the piston. Make sure the prongs engage the recesses on the piston face.

Under normal conditions, the caliper will be still be connected to the brake line and will be performing this in place.

In this example we are installing a brand new oem caliper, so it’s completely disconnected. It still needed to be compressed because the Girodisc magic pads are a little thicker than stock.


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Now drive the piston in. By turning tool handle counterclockwise


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Takes a bit of effort to compress. When it got stuck, turned it both directions at times and wiggled it a little, but it finally went to where we needed it.


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Place the caliper back over the pads.


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Line up and reinstall the (2) pins. Then tighten. I prefer to use anti seize on the threads, for easy disassembly in future, but my nephew says not needed. Reinstall the black plastic caps


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Reinstall the holding clip. Can do by hand or use needle nose pliers.


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Be sure to reconnect the electrical plug on EPB motor if disconnected it.


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Top off the brake fluid. Pump the brakes a few times, then top off again. Replace cap and close hood.
Then use the Autel to take the car out of brake pad maintenance mode and back to normal condition. Apply the E-brake so the car doesn’t roll when placed back on the ground.


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Used genuine Honda Dot 3 brake fluid. Likely will switch to a different fluid if begin taking the car to the track.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #18
2BF74128-ACAE-4ED3-BA9D-9D4BA6388810.jpeg

Figured now would be a good time to install SST brakelines, so went with Sakebomb... it was a tossup between them and Goodridge.

My nephew installed (3) of the (4) lines so I wasn’t able to take as many pics as I’d have liked, but It’s a pretty straightforward install. We didn’t get to do the 4th line or bleed the brakes due to an issue with the Girodisc rotor install.. will share more on that later. The plus side to that is I’ll get to install the last line ;)


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Fitment isn’t the best. OEM on left. Sakebomb on right. Sakebomb’s bend does not match OEM and it also is missing the OEM guide pin. Not sure if this is an issue with other brands.. but for $171 shipped hoped it would be dead on.

Didn’t catch any photos of disassembly but will say a 10mm flare nut wrench is a must to loosen the OEM connections, as they have a tendency to round when using a standard combo wrench. Hardest part was removing the retaining clip.


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Installing the new clip


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Tightening the brake line connector


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Installing the holding clamp.


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Rear Brake line installed. It is missing the guide pin which normally connects to the hole on the left of the bolt.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #19
After replacing the driver’s side rear caliper, rear brake pads and brake lines, we attempted to replace the OEM front rotors with Gyrodiscs then ran into an issue...

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Brand new out of the box. Though it says FK-2, pretty sure it’s the same part number for the FK8 . Ordered this directly from Gyrodisc for the 2018 Type R, so it should be correct.


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We suspect the center bore is slightly off, which is preventing the rotor from fully seating against the wheel hub.


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The result is the spacing is off. With the Brembo caliper bolted back on, the clearances are off. Notice the lack of a gap on the left. We pulled the caliper and rotor off and tried several times to re-install but no luck. If the lower gap was adjusted to be spaced evenly, then the issue would move to the upper part of the caliper. When trying to seat the rotor, it feels there is a slight “wobble” indicating its not fully seated and flush against the wheel hub. We tried installing with (1) holding screw, (2) holding screws, zero screws and with pads. Nothing worked :(


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Fished the OEM rotor out of the trash and reinstalled. Could feel it fully seat immediately when pressed against the hub. The clearance gaps are perfect.


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Couldn’t see any obvious difference, but something is definitely not right. Took the OEM and Girodisc rotor to my machinist buddy and he measured the bore diameter and angles of both rotors and they are the same.. but i’m convinced something is off. Tried calling Gyrodisc, but they are closed Fridays. Monday being a holiday, I’m likely on hold until Tuesday, then several more days after that if new rotors are needed.

Will be coming up on (3) weeks of being out of action. Might brake bleed then keep with the OEM fronts until the Gyrodisc issue is resolved. Gonna try it again tomorrow, but I doubt anything will change.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #20
Well hey alright! Received some install tips and words of encouragement from Mario_Kart and sublimecat (thank you gentlemen)... so gave it another shot last night after work...

Wife was away visiting friends and the boys had their buddies over to watch some boxing match. Perfect opportunity to tinker on the Type R without getting in trouble with the missus ;)

Grabbed a Husky 7000 lumen light stand from Home Depot for $100 to make things easier. What a game changer...Should have gotten one a long time ago.

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Prior to this was using headlamps, flashlights and sometimes my phone...lights the area nicely.



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Sanded the rust and corrosion from the hub using 80 grit emory cloth.



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Then sprayed a little bit of kroil to help things slide



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Put the rotor on and installed (2) holding screws. Got the 2nd one from the driver’s side rotor.


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Lightly tapped the rotor using a rubber deadblow. In hindsight, could have used a cloth in between so it doesn’t leave marks... but they wipe off. Each time I went around the rotor with the mallet, the holding screws would loosen and I could tighten them some more. Kept doing this until there was no more screw adjustment and the rotor was fully seated.


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Gap is now perfect, the Gyrodisc rotors appear to be fine. I’m back in business ;)
 
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fatherpain

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  • #21
Drove the car last night and today. Feels like a brand new car after commuting in my 1995 Accord for the past 2.5 weeks. Bedded the rotors and pads per Gyrodisc’s instructions. Brakes feel great with the new rotors, SS front pads and rear magic pads. No squealing so far.

Here’s a photo walkthrough of replacing the front rotors and pads:

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Tools needed.


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car raised and wheels removed and turned to provide space to work (using lift, so not chocked).


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Loosen the (2) bolts securing the Brembo caliper using 19mm combo. There is also a hard brake line to remove. A 10mm flare nut wrench is needed, otherwise fitting will likely round off. Passenger side shown. Remove one bolt, loosen but leave the 2nd. Have a catch pan ready to catch leaking brake fluid. ***note this step is not needed if only changing pads. This for a rotor swap also***


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One of the bolts on the driver’s side rotor was super tight, interlocked a 2nd combo to increase leverage to break loose


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Use a starting punch to drive the (2) pins out.


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Remove the pin with a vicegrip or use a drift pin to punch it the rest of the way out. I prefer using the drift pin.


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Remove the brass colored spring clip when the last pin is removed.


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Remove the old pads and compress the cylinder pistons. Note which pad has the wear indicator and it’s location.


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There is a hard tubing on the backside of the caliper. Disconnect using the 10mm flare nut wrench and have the catch pan ready to catch any brake fluid that drips out.


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Remove the last bolt that was holding Brembo housing then set it aside.


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It’s going to get dirty again right away, but I still like to clean the old brake dust off. Also can ensure the (4) pistons are fully compressed. They move easily by hand.


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Here is the rotor exposed. There is (1) small Phillips head screw holding the rotor to the wheel hub.


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If the screw is stubborn, spray some kroil liquid penetrant, then use an impact driver. This method also works. Nephew put the round head of ball peen hammer against the screw head, then struck the hammer once or twice with a heavier sledge. The screw then came out easily.


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Remove the old rotor and this is what’s left.


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Condition of OEM front pads @22,300 miles


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The wear indicator shows I could have gone a little longer.. but was getting close.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #22
To reassemble front rotors and pads, open the hood and remove the brake fluid cap.

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Remove rust from wheel hub using Emory cloth


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Spray some lubricant on hub


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Clean the new rotors with brake cleaner and a rag to remove the oil they are shipped with. Place rotor on hub and insert the holding screw.


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Girodisc says the rotor should slide right on. Mine did not. If so lightly tap the rotor using a rubber mallet all around.


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Each time the holding screw may loosen. Tighten it. Repeat tapping and tightening until there is no more movement and the rotors are fully seated. I used (2) holding screws instead of just the (1) that was originally on it. (Borrowed the 2nd screw from the other rotor to ensure the rotor was drawn in evenly. Did the same for the other side.


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Never seized the caliper holding bolts


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Reinstall the Brembo caliper housing and reinstall the (2) holding bolts and tighten using the 19mm combo to 103 ft-lbs, per Honda. We just did it as tight we could get by hand.


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Apply some brake grease to the backing plate of the new pads


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Then install. The pads should drop in. A good idea to light tap them down to make sure fully seated. Pad with wear indicator clip goes to the inside.


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Use Emory cloth to remove rust from the caliper pins. Then apply a light coat of antiseize.


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Line up the bronze spring clamp then reinsert the pins. Tap the pins to make sure they fully engage.


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Check the spacing between the caliper housing and rotor. Should be evenly spaced. Spin the rotor and verify the spacing remains even throughout its travel.


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Be sure to reinstall the hard tubing to the caliper. Then you are ready to bleed the brakes, reinstall the wheels then you are done
 
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fatherpain

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  • #23
After the rear brakes, front brakes and SST brake line install was complete, it was time to bleed the air from the brake system. We did it the old school method: one person pumping the brake pedal while the other person bled each caliper. We bled the brakes in a Z pattern:

Rear passenger
Rear driver
Front passenger: outer bleeder then inner
Front driver: outer bleeder then inner

Then re-did the rear passenger, rear driver just in case...

————
I’ve seen posts stating a different sequence:
FP->FD->RP->RD

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Verify the brake fill cap is open and have several bottles of Honda DOT3 brake fluid ready.


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We started at the passenger caliper.


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Remove the rubber bleeder cap.


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Connect a 7/32 vaccum tubing to the bleeder and insert to an empty bottle to catch brake fluid. A clear tubing would have been better to see air bubbles.


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The rear bleeder uses a 10mm combo wrench. Wait for your buddy to pump the brakes (5) times then have them keep pressing the brake pedal.


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With the brake pedal pressed, open the bleeder fitting about a 1/4 turn


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A little bit of air and brake fluid will come out then stop. Reclose the bleeder.


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Refill the brake fluid. It is important not to let this level drop to a level that will allow air to enter the system.


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Repeat this process until no more air escapes and you get full streams of brake fluid. Tighten the bleeder fitting then put the rubber cap back on. Move to the driver’s side rear caliper and repeat.


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With both rear brakes bled, move to the passenger front. There are (2) bleeder fittings. Do the outer first then the inner. Process is the same as the rears.


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The front bleeders use a 11mm flare nut wrench


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Outer first.


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Then inner last. As a precaution we did the rears one last time.

Make sure everything is tight and in place. Reinstall the rubber caps. Wipe down any spills.


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Reinstall the wheels, lower the car then torque lug nuts to 94 ft/lbs.


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All that’s left is to bed the brake and pads. Here is Girodisc’s procedure. It’s probably similar for all pads and rotors.
 
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fatherpain

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  • #24
With my DIY brake pad and rotor adventure concluded, figured it would also be a good time to change the oil and install the Fumoto drain valve I’ve had sitting on the shelf for a few months.


EDC61771-AE4A-4073-81A0-32B28E33169E.jpeg

Tools needed:
17mm socket and ratchet
Flat screwdriver
Phillips screwdriver
Funnel
Catch pan
Fumoto drain valve - F106
Crescent wrench
5.7 quarts of Honda Genuine 0-20W full synthetic oil
New oil filter and crush gasket
Cardboard, paper towels and plastic bags
a way to safely lift the car.


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Use the Phillips and flat screwdrivers to remove the undercarriage shield. Be sure to wear eye protection.


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(2) Phillips and the rest are flat head plastic clips that turn 1/4 turn to remove.
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Remove the shield and set aside. The OEM oil drain plug is circled in green.


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Position cardboard and catch pan to capture drained oil. Open the hood and remove the oil fill cap.


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Remove the drain plug using a 17mm socket and ratchet.


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Oil has a little bit of head pressure and it seems like every time I’ve done this, I get surprised and due to the unexpected force of the oil stream, a little bit spills. After the bulk of the oil finishes draining, I like to let it drip for awhile.


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While it’s still draining, Loosen the oil filter using a oil filter wrench or cap wrench.


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Then remove. It will be slippery so be careful not to let it drop and splash. Using a cap wrench would probably minimize the risk of dropping the filter.


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Apply a little bit of new clean oil on the oil filter gasket seal. Filter is an OEM A02.
Clean the filter threads then install the new filter. I usually turn the filter by hand, 1/4 - 1/2 turn past when the filter makes contact.

Oil filter housing torque: 9 lb-ft or 12 Nm.


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Installed a Fumoto drain valve in place of the OEM drain plug to make draining much easier in the future. Also picked up Fumuto’s plastic drain cap and hose, which snaps onto the end of the valve that will contain and guide the oil and eliminate spills. Looking forward to trying it out on next oil change.


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Fumoto drain valve installed. Used a crescent wrench to tighten. Wish it had a cap or plug on the end as a failsafe in case the ball valve leaks through. The Fumoto does have a plastic clip that locks the valve handle in place.

Be sure to use a new crush washer when reinstalling the OEM drain plug or Fumoto valve.

Drain plug torque: 30 lb-ft or 40 Nm

Add 5.7 quarts of oil then reinstall the oil fill cap. Turn on car. Check for leaks and check the oil dipstick for proper level. Reinstall undercarriage shield. Close hood and lower car. Then all done.
 
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With my DIY brake pad and rotor adventure concluded, figured it would also be a good time to change the oil and install the Fumoto drain valve I’ve had sitting on the shelf for a few months.


EDC61771-AE4A-4073-81A0-32B28E33169E.jpeg

Tools needed:
17mm socket and ratchet
Flat screwdriver
Phillips screwdriver
Funnel
Catch pan
Fumoto drain valve - F106
Crescent wrench
5.7 quarts of Honda Genuine 0-20W full synthetic oil
New oil filter and crush gasket
Cardboard, paper towels and plastic bags
a way to safely lift the car.



F70736E4-16FB-46A5-B7DA-57A8C4D51186.jpeg

Use the Phillips and flat screwdrivers to remove the undercarriage shield. Be sure to wear eye protection.


B718479C-6B49-44DD-B137-7E4CA3077B3F.jpeg

(2) Phillips and the rest are flat head plastic clips that turn 1/4 turn to remove.
E4136290-7EBB-416A-8115-94B2E831B54D.jpeg
Remove the shield and set aside. The OEM oil drain plug is circled in green.


E9AE3B66-6754-470A-8A14-5C2DE16554ED.jpeg

Position cardboard and catch pan to capture drained oil. Open the hood and remove the oil fill cap.


6707570C-45A8-4674-AD8D-76A398146BDE.jpeg


Remove the drain plug using a 17mm socket and ratchet.


56025953-2548-444D-BF11-2C2A1BB6E3DB.jpeg
Oil has a little bit of head pressure and it seems like every time I’ve done this, I get surprised and due to the unexpected force of the oil stream, a little bit spills. After the bulk of the oil finishes draining, I like to let it drip for awhile.


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While it’s still draining, Loosen the oil filter using a oil filter wrench or cap wrench.


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Then remove. It will be slippery so be careful not to let it drop and splash. Using a cap wrench would probably minimize the risk of dropping the filter.

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Apply a little bit of new clean oil on the oil filter gasket seal. Filter is an OEM A02.
Clean the filter threads then install the new filter. I usually turn the filter by hand, 1/4 - 1/2 turn past when the filter makes contact.

Oil filter housing torque: 9 lb-ft or 12 Nm.

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Installed a Fumoto drain valve in place of the OEM drain plug to make draining much easier in the future. Also picked up Fumuto’s plastic drain cap and hose, which snaps onto the end of the valve that will contain and guide the oil and eliminate spills.

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Fumoto drain valve installed. Used a crescent wrench to tighten. Wish it had a cap or plug on the end as a failsafe in case the ball valve leaks through. The Fumoto does have a plastic clip that locks the valve handle in place.

Be sure to use a new crush washer when reinstalling the OEM drain plug or a Fumoto valve.

Drain plug torque: 30 lb-ft or 40 Nm

Add 5.7 quarts of oil then reinstall the oil fill cap. Turn on car. Check for leaks and check the oil dipstick for proper level. Close hood and lower car. Then all done.
Nice write up. One little trick I learned is to crack the oil filter slightly loose before pulling the drain plug. The pressure is equal at that point and it is way easier.
 
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Forgot to mention reinstalling the undercarriage shield after verifying no leaks. Updated the post.

Thank you, that is a very smart tip. Had I known that earlier, our concrete would be cleaner ;) I’m surprised by the force of the oil each time I remove the drain plug and it overshoots my catch pan and makes a mess.

Hopefully, will no longer have this issue using the Fumoto drain valve as it has an optional plastic cap and hose that snaps onto the valve discharge then oil can be directed straight to the catch pan.

Nice write up. One little trick I learned is to crack the oil filter slightly loose before pulling the drain plug. The pressure is equal at that point and it is way easier.
 

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Hopefully, will no longer have this issue using the Fumoto drain valve as it has an optional plastic cap and hose that snaps onto the valve discharge then oil can be directed straight to the catch pan.
Thanks for the write up. Fumoto drain valve is worth every penny. Anything that makes oil change less messy and quicker is great in my book now that I’ve to maintain four cars. I know people who track their cars use this, so not a concern there.
 
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50F87ADD-47CA-4186-80D4-53F23C4E84CB.jpeg

Also checked the Radium PCV oil catch can for carryover


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There was a little more than expected. This is probably 1.5 month’s worth. Wrote the date in my logbook. Will check it again in about a month. This is the 3rd time checking since install..there was some each previous check...but not as much as this. Makes me wish I had installed a PCV oil catch can as one of the first mods. I didn’t install one until around 20k miles driven :(

I believe this amount of carryover is significant to note, even if you do not have an oil catch can. The reason being your engine likely will be running a little low on oil by the time an oil change is needed.. so please monitor your oil level periodically and top off as needed.


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Also checked the CCV oil catch can by checking the dip stick. No oil detected so far since install. The CCV can was put in the same time as the PCV.

Update: found oil in the CCV catch can after a track day, so dual catch cans are worth getting if you plan to track or drive your car hard. Probably not needed if using your car for regular daily driving.

The yellow hose is just a softener to prevent the sharp edge on the green fitting from rubbing against the black hose.
 
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Heh, yes i’m currently maintaining (3) cars but will be up to (4) next year when my oldest begins driving then (5) a few years later when my youngest is ready.

I have (2) more Fumoto’s ready to install on our other cars at next oil change.

Looking forward to the next oil change so can try draining with the Fumoto and their plastic cap and tubing.

Do you use that also?

Thanks for the write up. Fumoto drain valve is worth every penny. Anything that makes oil change less messy and quicker is great in my book now that I’ve to maintain four cars. I know people who track their cars use this, so not a concern there.
 
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One of my favorite mods has been the Acuity, shifter cable bushing upgrade, fully adjustable shifter and a weighted shift knob, which have been been installed for about a month.

Was happy with the stock shifter...but decided to upgrade because of the many positive comments regarding Acuity...
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Installed Acuity’s shifter cable bushing upgrade to see the difference. Gotta love the packaging description lol.


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Acuity has a lot of good install information posted online:

https://acuityinstruments.com/pages/install-guides

And there are also YouTube videos posted, so I won’t do a step by step, other than to share a tip to remove these stubborn clips when replacing the OEM bushings.


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Had no luck loosening the clips that secure them using a flat screwdriver.. so improvised and used a pry bar and crescent wrench.


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Inserted the tip of the prybar under the edge of a clip then rotated using the crescent wrench. Worked like a champ. Ez peazy!


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Once the clip was lifted a little, was then able to use a flathead screwdriver get in there to pry the clip off the rest of the way. Using spray penetrant also helps.


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Acuity shifter bushings installed. It’s too bad the bushings are normally not visible underneath other components because they look great.


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Though Acuity’s install guide didn’t call for it, applied a light coat of O-ring lube to the rubber bushings before installing to the metal holders.


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Like this. Apply the light coat of non hardening O-ring lube or silicone on entire surface of the bushings before inserting to the metal holders. Result will be buttery smooth shifts. ;)

If you are a DIY, the Acuity cable shifter bushing upgrade seems to be a no-brainer. It’s a relatively inexpensive mod unless paying a shop to install it.

The bushing gives the shifter a more substantial feel. I ran with just this upgrade alone for about a week and noticed the improvement over stock. Highly recommended.
 
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