DIY refrigerant recharge experiences

Shtumpa

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If anyone DIYed recharging refrigerant (1234yf) or if service center recharged without repairing underlying leak, please share their experiences:

- For how long did the a/c work? Various thread comments seem to vary anywhere from days to a year.

- Did the refrigerant leak out after not using it for a while (seal issues)?

- Any issues getting serviced after DIYing repairs? (e.g. used 134a refrigerant shop probably won’t touch it, only replace entire system). Can they tell you added your own 1234yf?



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Shtumpa

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This probably isn’t a great idea I know but a bit desperate right know, want to get through summer.
 

jayy_swish

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You probably shouldn’t fill up a leaking system as this new refrigerant (1234yf) is highly flammable
 
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You probably shouldn’t fill up a leaking system as this new refrigerant (1234yf) is highly flammable
looked into that it’s not highly flammabe at all - 6% of air with 5-10k mJ ignition. Not concerned. If it was really dangerous it woudnt be used. Of course if it all leaks out immediately don’t keep refilling lol.
 
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Filled it just now. Freezing cold. Lets hope it lasts the summer.

Put in almost entire can 8 oz honeywell 1234yf. The fact that it was that empty isn't a great sign...
 

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I've recharged the R134a system on my 2000 Honda Civic SI using a manifold gauge set, and a vacuum pump after replacing the A/C compressor. I can imagine modern day systems use a similar procedure.

With the setup, the vacuum pump will suck all air out of the entire system from the low and high sides. Once done you close off the low and high sides on the manifold, and let it sit so you can monitor the low side gauge making sure it stays at -1 bar. If you have a leak, the system will not hold a vacuum and it will work its way back to 0 bar and when you go to recharge, the system won't take in refrigerant.

Basically if you have a leak, find it and fix it because the refrigerant and system vacuum/pressure is just going to decrease over time.

Also:
  • Never add/charge refrigerant using the high side
  • You also have to be very careful with how much refrigerant you fill your system with, there is a specified amount in FL OZ on a sticker in the engine bay. Too little or too much results in under and overcharging
When done correctly, the A/C charge lasts years and rarely has to be recharged unless there is a leak that's developed somewhere in the system.

Setup:
IMG_20190802_135438.jpg


Vacuum Pump:
IMG_20190802_135524.jpg


Manifold Gauge Showing -1 Bar on the Low Side:
IMG_20190802_135456.jpg
 
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Si_chRis

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- Any issues getting serviced after DIYing repairs? (e.g. used 134a refrigerant shop probably won’t touch it, only replace entire system). Can they tell you added your own 1234yf?
If your system is hooked up to a manifold gauge to monitor pressures on the low and high sides when your engine is running with the A/C cycling, the gauges can show an indication that refrigerant has been added only in an overcharge case in where the pressures would indicate. The only other way is if they perform a recovery of the refrigerant and recover out more than specified system amounts.

However if you have a leak in the system, over time it would result in undercharge pressures and loss of refrigerant.
 
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thanks for the detailed posts!
 

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If anyone DIYed recharging refrigerant (1234yf) or if service center recharged without repairing underlying leak, please share their experiences:

- For how long did the a/c work? Various thread comments seem to vary anywhere from days to a year.

- Did the refrigerant leak out after not using it for a while (seal issues)?

- Any issues getting serviced after DIYing repairs? (e.g. used 134a refrigerant shop probably won’t touch it, only replace entire system). Can they tell you added your own 1234yf?
How long it will last depends on the size of hour leak. If it took a long time to fail and was slowly getting "not as cold as it used to be" then it will likely last for some time after the recharge. But leaks come in all sizes and some tend to get bigger with time.

If you don't grossly overcharge, and don't damage the valves, no one can tell you recharged it. You don't need to evacuate if there is still some refrigerant left. The only way to recharge the right amount in this case is to charge to the correct pressure while the system is running and you monitor the temperatures.
 
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BriteBlue

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Anyone remember the sight glass on older cars? If you saw bubbles the system was low on freon.
 

FC3L15B7

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If anyone DIYed recharging refrigerant (1234yf) or if service center recharged without repairing underlying leak, please share their experiences:

- For how long did the a/c work? Various thread comments seem to vary anywhere from days to a year.

- Did the refrigerant leak out after not using it for a while (seal issues)?

- Any issues getting serviced after DIYing repairs? (e.g. used 134a refrigerant shop probably won’t touch it, only replace entire system). Can they tell you added your own 1234yf?
It's illegal to recharge a cooling system without repairing the leak. Are you complaining about that, or are you wanting that over a proper repair?

You also have to know that a leak destroys the ozone layer that helps protects us from sunburn and skin cancer, so there's no fucking excuse, I have to say..
 

Gruber

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You also have to know that a leak destroys the ozone layer that helps protects us from sunburn and skin cancer, so there's no fucking excuse, I have to say..
False. :doh:Learn about it first, before preaching here.
1234yf and 134a have no effect on the ozone layer. In other words, their Ozone Depleting Potentials are zero.

134a was only replaced by 1234yf because of its alleged so called Global Warming Potential.
The GWP of 1234yf is less than that of the fart gas.

This means that if you release one pound of 1234yf (about the full capacity of the civic's AC) in the atmosphere, you contribute to "global warming" as much as by burning less than one cup of E10 gasoline. Less than one cup of gasoline burned will produce one pound of CO2. That one cup of gas will let you drive about 2 miles.

Yes, go figure, by driving 2 miles in the civic you will make a pound of CO2, which will contribute to "global warming" even more than releasing the whole charge of the civic's AC system.:yes:

Now, remember that last drive to the gas station to get donuts? By doing this, you destroyed the atmosphere more than the guy who stayed home but released his refrigerant......not even counting the farts produced by these donuts......:eek:

OK, class dismissed.
 

FC3L15B7

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False. :doh:Learn about it first, before preaching here.
1234yf and 134a have no effect on the ozone layer. In other words, their Ozone Depleting Potentials are zero.

134a was only replaced by 1234yf because of its alleged so called Global Warming Potential.
The GWP of 1234yf is less than that of the fart gas.

This means that if you release one pound of 1234yf (about the full capacity of the civic's AC) in the atmosphere, you contribute to "global warming" as much as by burning less than one cup of E10 gasoline. Less than one cup of gasoline burned will produce one pound of CO2. That one cup of gas will let you drive about 2 miles.

Yes, go figure, by driving 2 miles in the civic you will make a pound of CO2, which will contribute to "global warming" even more than releasing the whole charge of the civic's AC system.:yes:

Now, remember that last drive to the gas station to get donuts? By doing this, you destroyed the atmosphere more than the guy who stayed home but released his refrigerant......not even counting the farts produced by these donuts......:eek:

OK, class dismissed.
Absolutely technically true. I was trying to drive home the point. R134a has a Global Warming Potential rating of 1430 and is absolutely classified as a high global warming potential gas, though technically not "ozone depleting".

I wasn't really referring to R-1234yf - but R134a wasn't classified as harmful in 1995 either, so again, no fucking excuse. Absolutely. lol. And to further the point, it's still illegal to recharge leaking systems in many state and local jurisdictions and that includes R-1234yf.

Don't make excuses for people because I didn't happen to technically draw out every scenario. 😒
 
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wilbur_the_goose

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Shtumpa - why wouldn't you take it to a Honda dealer? There's an extended AC component warranty in effect (10 yrs., I think). My '16 started blowing warm air - took it in and they replaced the evaporator and recharged the system at no cost to me. It was actually a very good experience.
 
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Shtumpa

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Shtumpa - why wouldn't you take it to a Honda dealer? There's an extended AC component warranty in effect (10 yrs., I think). My '16 started blowing warm air - took it in and they replaced the evaporator and recharged the system at no cost to me. It was actually a very good experience.
If it stops working that's what I will do I suppose. The experiences posted here have been very mixed to put it mildly. I'm glad it went smoothly for you.
 

                           

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