DelllyJougnut's Sport FK7 Build Journal

dellyjoughnut

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Had the 2019 Civic Sport Hatchback since August 2019. Most of what I plan is to DIY it as much as I can without buying.

Current mods on the cars as of June 9, 2020:
  • Rear diffuser (2019)
IMG_1358.jpg

  • Aluminum sheet metal covering the area right in front of the rear lower control arms on the left and right side of the car. (2019 & June 2020) The photo you see below is for the driver's side where the gas tank is.
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The general procedure is using cardboard to get a rough template. Transferred cardboard template to craft paper. Transfer craft paper template onto 0.063" aluminum I could find at my metal supplier in the remnants section. Mounting is based on utilizing any existing hole and fasteners. To stiffen some of the sections, I used the backside of a blacksmith's hammer and a 25lb mallet to emboss the sheet metal with ridges.

For the rear diffuser. It's made using 4 different panels with screws and nuts. I had to fashion bracket with a roller dies to hold it in 2 places. I used existing bolt holes on the rear crash beam for mounting the back portion of the diffuser. The front section of the diffuser is attached to the exhaust pipe with another bracket, nuts, and bolts.


I did these two mods to hopefully decrease drag even further and increase MPG. I know honda did a good job on the aero, but I want to go farther. I have driven as fast as 100mph to get a feel for the rear and it's different from stock, but it's subjective to my perspective. I chose not to paint these pieces. The rear diffuser is dirty with road dirt, but it's a way to assess airflow and a need for strakes. So far I seeing a smooth flow pattern from the middle section of the diffuser. The section behind the tire does not exhibit that pattern. I'll have to confirm with flow-vis paint of some kind to be sure.



Future mods:
  • Aluminum gated shifter.
  • Wheel covers for drag reduction on stock 18" or buy wheels that have wheel covers in 18"
  • Tein Flex Z with EDFC
  • Lighter exhaust system not using stainless steel and titanium.
  • Rear wing without drilling door to the trunk. Installed the Caruse Aeroflap in 4/2021.
  • New intake manifold using Porsche's design that works only with forced induction. I found their patent google searching for it. This mod will not happen anytime soon due to complexity and need to verify in CAD. Won't do this because CARB rule and I won't pass smog.

Edit: Additional Mods added on 9/6/2020
  • Differential: Wavetrac or Mfactory
  • Transmission gearset: PPG gearset
  • New pistons and connecting rods
  • Pistons get thermal barrier coating
  • WPC Treatment on everything that moves
I'm currently a working student and can only do smaller projects like a gated shifter, but this is what I plan. No plans to tune ECU for now. Focusing more on aerodynamics.





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dellyjoughnut

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Currently working on my own design of a strut brace. I have looked at the chassis diagram of the FK7 and came to the conclusion the strut tower is connected to the firewall due to how it's constructed.
 
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dellyjoughnut

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1/9/2021 update

Here's What I did so far.
  • Whiteline 22mm rear sway bar with accord endlinks on stiffest setting because I can't get them on the softest setting
  • FK8 subframe brace
  • Perrin rear motor mounts
  • Acuity shifter and bushings
  • Custom strut tower bar complete
I can definitely feel the rear of my FK7 keep up with the front. Wasn't like it on stock where the rear felt like it was lagging behind. The FK8 subframe brace and strut tower bars were like mods with no perceived improvements... mostly comfort ride mods I did not feel anything major. The Perrin rear motor mounts have increase vibration, but I can definitely feel my engagement with the acuity shifter and bushing. Shifts are much better and I am more confident in which gear I am in thanks to less free play.

I'll share more on the custom strut tower bar after I secure the required components used in that build for different areas of the car where the same component can be used.
 
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dellyjoughnut

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2/3/2021

This is the post where I show the custom strut tower bar I made in 2020.


Below is how it looks on the car before I finished it to make sure it fits.

IMG_1510.jpg




In this photo, I bought a used Rear Nismo Yamaha Performance Damper for 370Z from eBay. I'm using 1/8" thick 4130 steel as the base of the strut mount to give me appropriate thread engagement on the nuts. A piece of 0.5" thick steel cold rolled steel is welded to the base of the strut mount.

IMG_1513.jpg




I had to turn, bore, and thread a 5/8" steel round to extend the length of the Nismo damper to the appropriate length for my FK7. Since Yamaha makes these dampers with a thread section tightened by a nut, it makes this project easier.

IMG_1503.jpg






The next 4 photos below are popping the strut mounts in my toaster oven modified for PCB reflow soldering. I baked it add an oxidized layer for corrosion protection since the cost of DIY nickel plating and time constraint seems too much. Then I sprayed it with high-temperature primer and high-temperature black paint and baked it as specified on the spray can. I had to finished baking in my grill because the toaster over seems to have an issue going to 600C.


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I was rushing at this point for the black paint to cure, Not the best finish.
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This is before installation on my car. I added Kapton tape for some heat protection to the damper because the engine bay runs too hot.

IMG_1528.jpg


Basically, I took the Subaru approach to have a stiffer tower with some dampening for comfort. And to experiment with these dampers because Yamaha makes them as an OEM part for Lexus LC 500. I wasn't going to pay $1420 for the Spoon Motion Control Beam if I can try something for cheaps. A strut tower bar isn't required because Honda has it welded to the firewall when looking at the chassis diagram for the 10th gen civic. This modification is really subtle in feeling changes to ride I can't tell. I won't know what changes Yamaha makes to these dampers since each one seems to be specific to car platform/dynamics.



The next I did was squat on Yamaha body dampers and searched for cheap ones at a bargain so I can do it for the front and rear bumpers. I bought them from Up Garage USA. They are COX body dampers developed for the Scion FRS/BRZ for the 2012-2016 model year. The COX Body Dampers are made by Yamaha. The listing on Crooobar shows an item at 3 stars which is an indicator of part quality These dampers are in good condition with mild scratches. A usable excellent part for 3 stars by Japanese standards.

The exact listing I paid on Crooober for both the front and rear dampers with the mounting hardware: https://www.croooober.com/en/item/c...s/10545897/COX-BODY-YAMAHA-PERFORMANCE-DAMPER

IMG_1613.jpg
 
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dellyjoughnut

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2/23/2021

TL;DR: I have definitely noticed a reduction of vibration at the startup, 700 rpm idle, AC, and when I don't give enough revs my clutch judders while Perrin Motormount Inserts. I think most of the reduction in vibration comes from the front-mounted damper. Not sure about what effect the rear damper has.

I have just finished mounting the COX body dampers with homemade brackets with the goal of making sure the front bracket was not sticking out under the car because that messes with the aerodynamics underneath the car. The COX damper for the front is mounted in the space underneath the stock intercooler and the front skirt. The exterior panel fit for the front skirt is slightly stress due to the way I bent the brackets to fit and I’ll probably have to go back to fix that later.

I haven't done much driving yet to know if this mod has been beneficial against a "placebo". I do not have test data to show if a reduction of vibrations has been achieved while using the Perrin Motormount inserts. All I have is a noticeable reduction in vibrations at idle, 700 rpm, startup, AC, and clutch judder. It feels like stock even with Perrin Motormount Inserts. I am sure the reduction in vibrations comes from the front-mounted damper more than the rear.

My research on this type of damper made by Yamaha, and the Motion Control Beam probably made by Denso for Toyota and sold by Spoon, shows the mounting location critical to achieving the goal of vibration reduction. The Nismo damper I installed over my strut towers had barely any effect on daily driving compared to today's modification. Since this Civic is using a subframe construction. The front and rear dampers will be absorbing vibrations from their respective location.



As of now, I believe I am done with all exterior modifications and done with the dampers. I'll probably get started on the gated shifter after finding a place to laser scans parts in Los Angeles or try with cardboard. I intend to keep the gated shifter simple, but the gate spacings will be thin as seen in the Brother's Tuning Gated Shifter for the Ford Focus.



The picture below is of Damper's final location in the front.

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The picture below is of the bracket for the rear damper, I failed to take into account the space for the nut and bolt since it mounts to the top of the rear bumper. It fits as expected, but I now must use a crescent wrench fit to hold the bolt from spinning as I tighten the nut.
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3/22/2021
This is just a photo of the whole bracket before mounting it back on the car. I reused washers and used what I found in storage. Not an update for this.

Photo Mar 15, 12 55 34 PM.jpg
 
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dellyjoughnut

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3/22/2021

This is the gated shifter project update because I want one and no one has made one yet.

I'm starting a project using 3D photogrammetry because I got the stuff I need for this project already. I also wasn't about to pay $3000 for what I assume is an estimated price to have a 3D part scanned for my part for reverse engineering into a CAD format for easy model building.
  • Canon Rebel T2i
  • LED spotlights
  • Large white cloth
  • Cheap amazon plastic turntable
  • Tooling clay
  • Baby powder. Corn starch and flour also work.
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The center shifter console area dusted with baby powder.
IMG_9047.JPG



Picking the right software to compile the images and using Meshroom and Meshlab. Import OBJ file into Fusion 360. Unfortunately, the whole object exceeds 10,000 faces which makes it impossible to do a mesh to BREP conversion in Fusion 360. I'll just brute force by eye the whole gated shifter plate in the mesh model t

Desktop Screenshot 2021.03.22 - 17.16.02.20.png



All I have to do now is match an earlier drawing I did of my shifter installed and I should be fine.
 

jlamb30

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Just curious... why do you want a gated shifter plate? Is it for aesthetics or function? For me, gated requires a much more deliberate shift, instead of the smooth rowing motion of non-gated. Especially for our cars, which already have great stock shifters.

I still may go with a Type R shifter for a tad shorter throw with Acuity bits to remove some of the compliance, but I really don't have any complaints with my stock shifter. Since it's broken in, it's ultra smooth.
 
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dellyjoughnut

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Just curious... why do you want a gated shifter plate? Is it for aesthetics or function?
I want the sound of metal hitting metal on a shift. I already know it's going to be slightly hollow in sound because of the plastic center console.
 

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