CTR Clutch Delay Valve Removal

Fk8 4343

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The clutch delay valve is located inside of the clutch slave cylinder to slow down the engagement of the clutch to reduce shock to the drivetrain. With correct clutch control, the CDV is not needed. Instead it interferes with the operation of the transmission.

My certified pre-owned 2016 V6 Accord 6spd MT had a clutch that always felt direct, in control and with feedback from the drivetrain. By comparison, the CTR felt numb. The first owner removed the CDV from the Accord.

CDV removal on the CTR is easy with the exception of one hard step: removal of a metal retaining ring to get the CDV out. The ring needs to be in one piece so you can put the slave cylinder back together. It took me 45 minutes to get off :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:.

Damaging the inner walls during extraction of the CDV is possible and you would not be able to drive the car until the broken cylinder is replaced. If you first order a new slave cylinder and remove the CDV, then you will get the hardest part the done first.

@Acurately posted pictures of opening the slave cylinder.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/the-infamous-2nd-gear-crunch.12890/page-43#post-362120

@gylmar814 Has a write-up for CDV removal on the Si and an explanation of what the CDV does and why you may want to remove it.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/clutch-delay-valve-delete-prl-ss-clutch-line-install-review.21587/

@PRL Motorsports has another write-up for CDV removal.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/10th-gen-civic-1-5t-clutch-delay-valve-removal.13105/

There are a lot of youtube videos on CDV removal for Honda MT. Previous gen civics and Accords have the same CDV. This video explains a technique to get the ring off and something similar worked for me.

Recommended tools for opening the cylinder:
Vice and clamps – hold the cylinder with the ring end up
Tekton pick and hook set – retainer ring removal
Needlenose pliers with teeth – pull out the plug
Drill and drill bits (1/16”, 1/8”, 3/16”) – CDV extraction

It is important to be careful once the cylinder is open. Scratching the inner wall of the cylinder can cause a fluid leak so don't use the needle nose pliers to extract the CDV. I pulled the CDV out by drilling into it and getting the drill bit lodged inside. Started drilling with a 1/16” bit and then 1/8” to widen the hole. Then I took a 3/16” bit and twisted it into the hole by hand using pliers. The bit got stuck and then pulled out the CDV.


Slave cylinder removal and installation
Part 1: Remove the air box.

Mishimoto has a video showing the removal of the airbox for their performance intake installation.
Unplug MAF
Remove rubber air duct and loosen bolts
You don't need to remove all the rubber stripping like in the video, only the part holding the air duct down.
Remove intake tube
Remove air box
The air box can be opened and taken apart if it makes it easier to get out. The rubber air duct also comes off. The air box clips into a bracket on the bottom.

Part 2: Remove clutch slave cylinder
First, locate the slave cylinder, clutch hydraulic line and all of the components listed below. See Parts diagram for numbers.

Clutch cylinder.png


Slave cylinder (7)
Steel tube (18)
Rubber hose (15)
Bracket (17)
Nut (23)

First find the slave cylinder.
IMG_7467.JPG

The slave cylinder (7) is attached to a steel tube (18). The other end of the steel tube connects to a rubber hose (15) that is mounted at bracket (17) using nut (23).

FullSizeRender 46.jpg

Do not bend the steel tube. Remove the nut indicated by the arrow and unclip the bracket to take the tension off of the steel tube. Now unbolt the slave cylinder from the transmission. Slip the slave cylinder out from behind the water hoses and pull it up. The rubber hose is long enough that you can pull the slave cylinder to the top of the engine bay. I tied the end of the steel tube near where the intake was so that fluid didn't drip out after removing the slave cylinder. Remove the slave cylinder using 2 open ended wrenches.

Connect the slave cylinder (with CDV removed) to the hydraulic line. Put the slave cylinder back onto the transmission case, clip the hydraulic line bracket and secure with the nut. Torque the slave cylinder bolts to 16 ft lbs.

Bleeding
Thanks to @Acurately for clutch bleeding procedure
https://www.civicx.com/threads/clutch-fluid-brake-fluid-reservoir.11380/#post-365829
Put a 8mm box end wrench over the bleeder screw and then attach a ¼” plastic tube. Follow bleeding procedure. Have someone sit in the driver seat to operate the clutch while you loosen/tighten the bleeder screw.
1. Loosen the bleeder screw.
2. Push clutch pedal in. The displacement of the fluid from moving the pedal will push the air out of the cylinder.
3. Tighten the bleeder screw.
4. Release clutch pedal. Pull it up from the floor it does not come back on its own.
5. Repeat. Make sure brake fluid does not go below minimum level.



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gylmar814

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The clutch delay valve is located inside of the clutch slave cylinder to slow down the engagement of the clutch to reduce shock to the drivetrain. With correct clutch control, the CDV is not needed. Instead it interferes with the operation of the transmission.

My certified pre-owned 2016 V6 Accord 6spd MT had a clutch that always felt direct, in control and with feedback from the drivetrain. By comparison, the CTR felt numb. The first owner removed the CDV from the Accord.

CDV removal on the CTR is easy with the exception of one hard step: removal of a metal retaining ring to get the CDV out. The ring needs to be in one piece so you can put the slave cylinder back together. It took me 45 minutes to get off :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:.

Damaging the inner walls during extraction of the CDV is possible and you would not be able to drive the car until the broken cylinder is replaced. If you first order a new slave cylinder and remove the CDV, then you will get the hardest part the done first.

@Acurately posted pictures of opening the slave cylinder.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/the-infamous-2nd-gear-crunch.12890/page-43#post-362120

@gylmar814 Has a write-up for CDV removal on the Si and an explanation of what the CDV does and why you may want to remove it.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/clutch-delay-valve-delete-prl-ss-clutch-line-install-review.21587/

@PRL Motorsports has another write-up for CDV removal.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/10th-gen-civic-1-5t-clutch-delay-valve-removal.13105/

There are a lot of youtube videos on CDV removal for Honda MT. Previous gen civics and Accords have the same CDV. This video explains a technique to get the ring off and something similar worked for me.

Recommended tools for opening the cylinder:
Vice and clamps – hold the cylinder with the ring end up
Tekton pick and hook set – retainer ring removal
Needlenose pliers with teeth – pull out the plug
Drill and drill bits (1/16”, 1/8”, 3/16”) – CDV extraction

It is important to be careful once the cylinder is open. Scratching the inner wall of the cylinder can cause a fluid leak so don't use the needle nose pliers to extract the CDV. I pulled the CDV out by drilling into it and getting the drill bit lodged inside. Started drilling with a 1/16” bit and then 1/8” to widen the hole. Then I took a 3/16” bit and twisted it into the hole by hand using pliers. The bit got stuck and then pulled out the CDV.


Slave cylinder removal and installation
Part 1: Remove the air box.

Mishimoto has a video showing the removal of the airbox for their performance intake installation.
Unplug MAF
Remove rubber air duct and loosen bolts
You don't need to remove all the rubber stripping like in the video, only the part holding the air duct down.
Remove intake tube
Remove air box
The air box can be opened and taken apart if it makes it easier to get out. The rubber air duct also comes off. The air box clips into a bracket on the bottom.

Part 2: Remove clutch slave cylinder
First, locate the slave cylinder, clutch hydraulic line and all of the components listed below. See Parts diagram for numbers.

Clutch cylinder.png


Slave cylinder (7)
Steel tube (18)
Rubber hose (15)
Bracket (17)
Nut (23)

First find the slave cylinder.
IMG_7467.JPG

The slave cylinder (7) is attached to a steel tube (18). The other end of the steel tube connects to a rubber hose (15) that is mounted at bracket (17) using nut (23).

FullSizeRender 46.jpg

Do not bend the steel tube. Remove the nut indicated by the arrow and unclip the bracket to take the tension off of the steel tube. Now unbolt the slave cylinder from the transmission. Slip the slave cylinder out from behind the water hoses and pull it up. The rubber hose is long enough that you can pull the slave cylinder to the top of the engine bay. I tied the end of the steel tube near where the intake was so that fluid didn't drip out after removing the slave cylinder. Remove the slave cylinder using 2 open ended wrenches.

Connect the slave cylinder (with CDV removed) to the hydraulic line. Put the slave cylinder back onto the transmission case, clip the hydraulic line bracket and secure with the nut. Torque the slave cylinder bolts to 16 ft lbs.

Bleeding
Thanks to @Acurately for clutch bleeding procedure
https://www.civicx.com/threads/clutch-fluid-brake-fluid-reservoir.11380/#post-365829
Put a 8mm box end wrench over the bleeder screw and then attach a ¼” plastic tube. Follow bleeding procedure.
Great write up! for those who are still in the fence on doing this mod, I suggest just do it. It's really easy and straight forward. The C clip is the only part that might take some time for the user. A good set of tools will go a long way. I recommend the Tekton pick and hook set. Shouldn't cost no more than $10 on Amazon Prime. Pick carefully on the ends of the clip repeatedly and eventually you will weaken the clip and able to lift it right off. :) If you know how to bleed brake and clutches you will be fine. If not, go on youtube and their is various methods. Also I found since I was already in the area and having the bleed the clutch afterwards, I suggest take the opportunity and order and stainless steel braided clutch line ahead of time and upgrade. ;)
 

HRace

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Thanks for the detailed write up. Interesting method of removing the valve by drilling into it. I don’t know which method (using the picks or drilling into it) is best / easiest. I’ll
Probably order a new slave cylinder too.
 

gylmar814

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Thanks for the detailed write up. Interesting method of removing the valve by drilling into it. I don’t know which method (using the picks or drilling into it) is best / easiest. I’ll
Probably order a new slave cylinder too.
No The drilling is only for the actually CDV once you take the C clip off and the metal cap. You don't drill the actual slave cylinder. you will damage it. Even then, once you take the C clip and metal cap off you don't really need to drill anything. That's just an optional method. I suggest using the same picking tools you use to take off the C clip. Use the Curved hook tip. Pulling it out is not difficult.
 

HRace

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gylmar,
Sorry. I’m totally with ya. Didn’t mean drilling into the slave cylinder, just the valve. I’ll give the pick first shot and at least the drill bit is a good backup option. Thanks for the tips.
 
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Fk8 4343

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No The drilling is only for the actually CDV once you take the C clip off and the metal cap. You don't drill the actual slave cylinder. you will damage it. Even then, once you take the C clip and metal cap off you don't really need to drill anything. That's just an optional method. I suggest using the same picking tools you use to take off the C clip. Use the Curved hook tip. Pulling it out is not difficult.
gylmar,
Sorry. I’m totally with ya. Didn’t mean drilling into the slave cylinder, just the valve. I’ll give the pick first shot and at least the drill bit is a good backup option. Thanks for the tips.
Yes, try to pull it out with the pick first. For me the CDV wasn't moving and I was afraid that the pick would slip and scratch the cylinder wall. Maybe I was just tired from removing the metal ring. Drilling gently a few mm into the plastic CDV allowed me to grip it and pull it out without touching the walls.
 

HRace

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Yes, try to pull it out with the pick first. For me the CDV wasn't moving and I was afraid that the pick would slip and scratch the cylinder wall. Maybe I was just tired from removing the metal ring. Drilling gently a few mm into the plastic CDV allowed me to grip it and pull it out without touching the walls.
This may be a completely unfounded fear but in an effort to avoid any small shavings even from hand turning the drill bit (that’s why I was thinking trying the pick first), I wonder about poking that pick with the straight tip, straight into the top of the valve. Not sure if it will lodge in there to allow easy removal. Probably way overthinking this!!
 
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Fk8 4343

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This may be a completely unfounded fear but in an effort to avoid any small shavings even from hand turning the drill bit (that’s why I was thinking trying the pick first), I wonder about poking that pick with the straight tip, straight into the top of the valve. Not sure if it will lodge in there to allow easy removal. Probably way overthinking this!!
Poking it is a good place to start. See if that works for you. The drill bit was my plan B. The o-ring on the CDV will stop the shavings from falling into the cylinder. It is a good idea to wipe metal plug and the opening that the plug goes into to remove any dirt or grease so you get a good seal when its closed.
 

CTR1633FK2

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It's easy to push it out. There is a hole at the other side. Always good to grease the opening when pushing the cover back. I don't think that plastic piece can scratch the wall.
 

Sully311

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The clutch delay valve is located inside of the clutch slave cylinder to slow down the engagement of the clutch to reduce shock to the drivetrain. With correct clutch control, the CDV is not needed. Instead it interferes with the operation of the transmission.

My certified pre-owned 2016 V6 Accord 6spd MT had a clutch that always felt direct, in control and with feedback from the drivetrain. By comparison, the CTR felt numb. The first owner removed the CDV from the Accord.

CDV removal on the CTR is easy with the exception of one hard step: removal of a metal retaining ring to get the CDV out. The ring needs to be in one piece so you can put the slave cylinder back together. It took me 45 minutes to get off :banghead: :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:.

Damaging the inner walls during extraction of the CDV is possible and you would not be able to drive the car until the broken cylinder is replaced. If you first order a new slave cylinder and remove the CDV, then you will get the hardest part the done first.

@Acurately posted pictures of opening the slave cylinder.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/the-infamous-2nd-gear-crunch.12890/page-43#post-362120

@gylmar814 Has a write-up for CDV removal on the Si and an explanation of what the CDV does and why you may want to remove it.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/clutch-delay-valve-delete-prl-ss-clutch-line-install-review.21587/

@PRL Motorsports has another write-up for CDV removal.
https://www.civicx.com/threads/10th-gen-civic-1-5t-clutch-delay-valve-removal.13105/

There are a lot of youtube videos on CDV removal for Honda MT. Previous gen civics and Accords have the same CDV. This video explains a technique to get the ring off and something similar worked for me.

Recommended tools for opening the cylinder:
Vice and clamps – hold the cylinder with the ring end up
Tekton pick and hook set – retainer ring removal
Needlenose pliers with teeth – pull out the plug
Drill and drill bits (1/16”, 1/8”, 3/16”) – CDV extraction

It is important to be careful once the cylinder is open. Scratching the inner wall of the cylinder can cause a fluid leak so don't use the needle nose pliers to extract the CDV. I pulled the CDV out by drilling into it and getting the drill bit lodged inside. Started drilling with a 1/16” bit and then 1/8” to widen the hole. Then I took a 3/16” bit and twisted it into the hole by hand using pliers. The bit got stuck and then pulled out the CDV.


Slave cylinder removal and installation
Part 1: Remove the air box.

Mishimoto has a video showing the removal of the airbox for their performance intake installation.
Unplug MAF
Remove rubber air duct and loosen bolts
You don't need to remove all the rubber stripping like in the video, only the part holding the air duct down.
Remove intake tube
Remove air box
The air box can be opened and taken apart if it makes it easier to get out. The rubber air duct also comes off. The air box clips into a bracket on the bottom.

Part 2: Remove clutch slave cylinder
First, locate the slave cylinder, clutch hydraulic line and all of the components listed below. See Parts diagram for numbers.

Clutch cylinder.png


Slave cylinder (7)
Steel tube (18)
Rubber hose (15)
Bracket (17)
Nut (23)

First find the slave cylinder.
IMG_7467.JPG

The slave cylinder (7) is attached to a steel tube (18). The other end of the steel tube connects to a rubber hose (15) that is mounted at bracket (17) using nut (23).

FullSizeRender 46.jpg

Do not bend the steel tube. Remove the nut indicated by the arrow and unclip the bracket to take the tension off of the steel tube. Now unbolt the slave cylinder from the transmission. Slip the slave cylinder out from behind the water hoses and pull it up. The rubber hose is long enough that you can pull the slave cylinder to the top of the engine bay. I tied the end of the steel tube near where the intake was so that fluid didn't drip out after removing the slave cylinder. Remove the slave cylinder using 2 open ended wrenches.

Connect the slave cylinder (with CDV removed) to the hydraulic line. Put the slave cylinder back onto the transmission case, clip the hydraulic line bracket and secure with the nut. Torque the slave cylinder bolts to 16 ft lbs.

Bleeding
Thanks to @Acurately for clutch bleeding procedure
https://www.civicx.com/threads/clutch-fluid-brake-fluid-reservoir.11380/#post-365829
Put a 8mm box end wrench over the bleeder screw and then attach a ¼” plastic tube. Follow bleeding procedure.




So how is it feeling? Anymore grinds or "crunches"? I am VERY interested in this, and am thinking I will do it as well.
 
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Fk8 4343

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So how is it feeling? Anymore grinds or "crunches"? I am VERY interested in this, and am thinking I will do it as well.
The clutch pedal feels a bit different. When engaging the clutch I can feel the pedal pushing back so it feels stiffer.

Disengagement of the clutch is improved. Before removing the CDV, with the clutch pedal all the way down sometimes it would take more force to get out of 1st or 2nd gear like the clutch wasn't completely disengaged. That would mean the CDV was not functioning correctly since the CDV is only supposed to slow down engagement.

Before CDV removal, shifting on cold mornings this winter felt bad until the car had warmed up. The transmission was rough and notchy. Driving slow and shifting gently did not improve this. I didn't drive the Type R too much and left in the garage except for a few warmer days.

With the CDV removed, shifting gently when the car is cold feels fine. It slides into gear with light pressure on the shifter – how it is supposed to be. After warming up shifting is smooth.
 

Sully311

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The clutch pedal feels a bit different. When engaging the clutch I can feel the pedal pushing back so it feels stiffer.

Disengagement of the clutch is improved. Before removing the CDV, with the clutch pedal all the way down sometimes it would take more force to get out of 1st or 2nd gear like the clutch wasn't completely disengaged. That would mean the CDV was not functioning correctly since the CDV is only supposed to slow down engagement.

Before CDV removal, shifting on cold mornings this winter felt bad until the car had warmed up. The transmission was rough and notchy. Driving slow and shifting gently did not improve this. I didn't drive the Type R too much and left in the garage except for a few warmer days.

With the CDV removed, shifting gently when the car is cold feels fine. It slides into gear with light pressure on the shifter – how it is supposed to be. After warming up shifting is smooth.

Awesome, thanks for the follow up. I think I’ll be doing this very soon!! Mine acts just like you described, with an added grind now and again.
 

CivicR316

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prl only has clutch line for civic si will that work for type r too ?????
 

lhonda200

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What fluid are you guys using when bleeding the clutch, oem or?
 

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