Canadiaegean Blue's Si Sedan Build Thread

OP
CanadiaegeanBlue

CanadiaegeanBlue

Senior Member
First Name
Humza
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
865
Reaction score
1,498
Location
Toronto
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Si Sedan - Aegean Blue Metallic
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #241
Getting this thread caught back up to speed, Blue was basically parked up at my shop, @Unity Performance all winter while I borrowed a winter-beater 2008 Accord V6 from @Thusee. You all have been keeping us super busy at the shop, thank you for the support!

When we did the Clutch Kit, we installed the 27mm Solid FSB by Whiteline, as well as the Anti Lift Kit. The ALK can be installed at any time, but the FSB is best to do when your subframe is out for the clutch - makes little sense to pay for labor twice, just knock it out one time! How planted the front suspension is, and overall stability with these two on is to be experienced. In terms of straight line, I tested stability by maintaining 3-digit mph speeds for an extended period on the interstate. I've been up to those speeds before the ALK and FSB, and didn't feel anywhere near as comfortable. You can also see the Ultra Racing Front Power Brace, as well as the Front Cross Member installed - I would classify both as a "sum of all parts" combined upgrades, I wouldn't be able to pinpoint how much stiffer and stable those two made the car. All in, 4 great parts that dramatically improved the front suspension!

DSC_0714.JPG

DSC_0738 (1).JPG

DSC_0780.JPG



In terms of cornering, prior to these two upgrades I felt the steering to be quite numb, and I would need to make constant adjustments to even keep the car within the lane on the highway. That's now gone, even with winter tires there is good stability and minimal slop/vagueness in the steering feel. Here's a track-day vid from October, and you can see for a majority of the run I have smooth steering inputs.


The ACT Street Kit (also in above video) to touch on it quickly has been doing really well! Pedal feel is OEM so no loss of daily driving abilities there. You can't be lazy shifting with a 17lbs single mass flywheel however - revs drop quickly, and you are going to jerk it if you try to drive it like the stock clutch kit. Massive fan of this kit, we've sold quite a few over the last few months :)

All the parts and more you can find on my website, thank you guys for supporting always! This helps fund more and more projects that I will share in upcoming posts, and in the future!

https://unity-performance.com/





Advertisement

 

teders

Senior Member
First Name
Ted Dorosheff
Joined
Aug 1, 2017
Messages
443
Reaction score
339
Location
Mclean, Virginia
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic SI
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
Looking good man.

I dont remember if you did any significant power mods on this build, but you should start looking into transmission support regardless. Even more so if you are pushing more power, in addition to tracking the car more.

I just blew up my 4th gear at the track a few weeks ago, and i'm currently without wheels. 4th gear got sheared completely, and 6th and reverse lost some teeth as a result of shrapnel. Currently the transmission rebuild/reinforcement options aren't great. Most OEM parts are on international backorder without ETA, and with Honda currently pausing manufacturing in the US due to supply chain pressure, it looks to remain that way for quite a while.

Fortunately for me, i was able to locate a used trans out of a 2017 Si (wanted a 2020) and i also got lucky in that i know someone with a Honda Racing Line account, so i'll also be getting an HPD 4th gear pair. There are a few complete gear sets (PPG/Drag Cartel 1-4th and the MFactory close ratio gear set). Both of those options are really only ideal for a dedicated track car, PPG replaces 3rd so your speedo will be WAY off and the MFactory set will leave you with a minimum 4.5 FDR and is unfortunately extrememly hard to find right now.
 

Joerodd

Member
First Name
Joe
Joined
May 26, 2020
Messages
47
Reaction score
44
Location
Elida, Ohio
Car(s)
Ramona 2020 Si Sedan Aegean Blue Metallic
Country flag
I've seen you talking about Swift springs for the future of Blue, any idea when you'll be getting those done. You seem very thorough in your reviews and I'd like to read more about the driving characteristics than, "It drives nice, would recommend" lol.
 

teders

Senior Member
First Name
Ted Dorosheff
Joined
Aug 1, 2017
Messages
443
Reaction score
339
Location
Mclean, Virginia
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic SI
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
I've seen you talking about Swift springs for the future of Blue, any idea when you'll be getting those done. You seem very thorough in your reviews and I'd like to read more about the driving characteristics than, "It drives nice, would recommend" lol.
Springs are sort of difficult to describe on their own, because any characteristic/trait of the spring is going to be so dependent on the shock also. Swift springs (not even getting to spring rates yet) on stock shocks are going to be a different driving experience than if they were paired to new shocks with different dampening rates.

And for that matter, swift springs in particular are no different than any other spring, aside from the fact that they can be speced to a particular rate (5k,6k,etc) with less coils than other springs. Not sure what they do to accomplish this, but the result is more compression travel before the spring coils compress into themselves.

Really what you want to know is "how are the driving characteristics of X spring rate". I'm on Swift springs front and back (fortune auto 500 coilovers), with a 9k front rate and 8k rear rate. The stiffer spring rates up front are a typical spec of FWD cars, as they help ensure that wheel hop is reduced among many other things. Obviously all the usual body motions (dive, squat, roll) are significantly reduced compared to stock and the car feels much more connected to the road. The feedback from an input is more perceptible and happens sooner. Stiffer suspension also results in more of the engines horsepower being delivered to the wheels, because the spring is pushing the wheel harder into the ground (increasing grip). And since weight transfer is reduced, you would experience flatter cornering, less dive under braking and less squat under acceleration.

Despite all this the car remains fairly comfortable on highways too, but any stiffer than 9k will probably start to get pretty bouncy. Hope this helps.
 

Joerodd

Member
First Name
Joe
Joined
May 26, 2020
Messages
47
Reaction score
44
Location
Elida, Ohio
Car(s)
Ramona 2020 Si Sedan Aegean Blue Metallic
Country flag
Springs are sort of difficult to describe on their own, because any characteristic/trait of the spring is going to be so dependent on the shock also. Swift springs (not even getting to spring rates yet) on stock shocks are going to be a different driving experience than if they were paired to new shocks with different dampening rates.

And for that matter, swift springs in particular are no different than any other spring, aside from the fact that they can be speced to a particular rate (5k,6k,etc) with less coils than other springs. Not sure what they do to accomplish this, but the result is more compression travel before the spring coils compress into themselves.

Really what you want to know is "how are the driving characteristics of X spring rate". I'm on Swift springs front and back (fortune auto 500 coilovers), with a 9k front rate and 8k rear rate. The stiffer spring rates up front are a typical spec of FWD cars, as they help ensure that wheel hop is reduced among many other things. Obviously all the usual body motions (dive, squat, roll) are significantly reduced compared to stock and the car feels much more connected to the road. The feedback from an input is more perceptible and happens sooner. Stiffer suspension also results in more of the engines horsepower being delivered to the wheels, because the spring is pushing the wheel harder into the ground (increasing grip). And since weight transfer is reduced, you would experience flatter cornering, less dive under braking and less squat under acceleration.

Despite all this the car remains fairly comfortable on highways too, but any stiffer than 9k will probably start to get pretty bouncy. Hope this helps.
I understand how suspensions work, I guess I was assuming that it would be read as Swift spec R lowering springs with factory dampers, as that is a common combination for those choosing to opt for lowering springs/factory dampers vs the coilover route.
 

letsgoMINAJE

Senior Member
First Name
Minaje
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
287
Reaction score
221
Location
Lancaster, CA
Car(s)
2020 CBP Si Sedan
Country flag
Springs are sort of difficult to describe on their own, because any characteristic/trait of the spring is going to be so dependent on the shock also. Swift springs (not even getting to spring rates yet) on stock shocks are going to be a different driving experience than if they were paired to new shocks with different dampening rates.

And for that matter, swift springs in particular are no different than any other spring, aside from the fact that they can be speced to a particular rate (5k,6k,etc) with less coils than other springs. Not sure what they do to accomplish this, but the result is more compression travel before the spring coils compress into themselves.

Really what you want to know is "how are the driving characteristics of X spring rate". I'm on Swift springs front and back (fortune auto 500 coilovers), with a 9k front rate and 8k rear rate. The stiffer spring rates up front are a typical spec of FWD cars, as they help ensure that wheel hop is reduced among many other things. Obviously all the usual body motions (dive, squat, roll) are significantly reduced compared to stock and the car feels much more connected to the road. The feedback from an input is more perceptible and happens sooner. Stiffer suspension also results in more of the engines horsepower being delivered to the wheels, because the spring is pushing the wheel harder into the ground (increasing grip). And since weight transfer is reduced, you would experience flatter cornering, less dive under braking and less squat under acceleration.

Despite all this the car remains fairly comfortable on highways too, but any stiffer than 9k will probably start to get pretty bouncy. Hope this helps.
I did not know completely how suspensions worked. Thanks for this explanation. One question I have is what is the stock rates? and what rates would be viable for what you explained above while not giving up comfort?
 

arpypat

Senior Member
First Name
Arpan
Joined
Jun 29, 2019
Messages
1,398
Reaction score
1,778
Location
KC
Car(s)
2019 Civic Si
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
I did not know completely how suspensions worked. Thanks for this explanation. One question I have is what is the stock rates? and what rates would be viable for what you explained above while not giving up comfort?
OEM spring rates for Si sedan/coupe:
Front Spring Rate: 144.186 lbs/in
Rear Spring Rate: 208.776 lbs/in

If using metric system, 56 lbs/in = 1Kg/mm.
 

letsgoMINAJE

Senior Member
First Name
Minaje
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
287
Reaction score
221
Location
Lancaster, CA
Car(s)
2020 CBP Si Sedan
Country flag
OEM spring rates for Si sedan/coupe:
Front Spring Rate: 144.186 lbs/in
Rear Spring Rate: 208.776 lbs/in

If using metric system, 56 lbs/in = 1Kg/mm.
So then what springs would you suggest to upgrade handling/suspension performance without sacrificing too much comfort or if possible, improving comfort? For daily driving.
 

arpypat

Senior Member
First Name
Arpan
Joined
Jun 29, 2019
Messages
1,398
Reaction score
1,778
Location
KC
Car(s)
2019 Civic Si
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
So then what springs would you suggest to upgrade handling/suspension performance without sacrificing too much comfort or if possible, improving comfort? For daily driving.
Check this guide out: https://www.civicx.com/forum/threads/civic-si-lowering-springs-master-guide.46422/

I personally went with K-Tuned springs as they offered a mild drop and roughly 20% stiffer front/rear spring rates. Rides pretty close to stock when not in sport mode. I like to do things different than most ppl LOL! Most members chose the eibach pro-kit for a ride close to OEM and springs that don't break the bank.

I will note that the K-Tuned springs did get a price cut since I got them last year. Almost $100 cheaper than they used to be!
 
OP
CanadiaegeanBlue

CanadiaegeanBlue

Senior Member
First Name
Humza
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
865
Reaction score
1,498
Location
Toronto
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Si Sedan - Aegean Blue Metallic
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #250
Looking good man.

I dont remember if you did any significant power mods on this build, but you should start looking into transmission support regardless. Even more so if you are pushing more power, in addition to tracking the car more.

I just blew up my 4th gear at the track a few weeks ago, and i'm currently without wheels. 4th gear got sheared completely, and 6th and reverse lost some teeth as a result of shrapnel. Currently the transmission rebuild/reinforcement options aren't great. Most OEM parts are on international backorder without ETA, and with Honda currently pausing manufacturing in the US due to supply chain pressure, it looks to remain that way for quite a while.

Fortunately for me, i was able to locate a used trans out of a 2017 Si (wanted a 2020) and i also got lucky in that i know someone with a Honda Racing Line account, so i'll also be getting an HPD 4th gear pair. There are a few complete gear sets (PPG/Drag Cartel 1-4th and the MFactory close ratio gear set). Both of those options are really only ideal for a dedicated track car, PPG replaces 3rd so your speedo will be WAY off and the MFactory set will leave you with a minimum 4.5 FDR and is unfortunately extrememly hard to find right now.
I read your thread, sorry to see that man :( Hope the rebuild is going well! I've taken it easy with the power mods; car is FBO, but that's just ouf of need to test all the setups. No transmission issues to date, I changed out to Amsoil Synchromesh with the clutch install.

The dedicated gear sets are really expensive, I can't yet justify the cost. Glad that you have an HPD contact, I'll get into that eventually as power mods are the last items on my list for Unity. Looking forward to hearing from you how it goes!


I've seen you talking about Swift springs for the future of Blue, any idea when you'll be getting those done. You seem very thorough in your reviews and I'd like to read more about the driving characteristics than, "It drives nice, would recommend" lol.
Yes sir, Swifts are sitting on my shelf. I still want to get some more seat time in with the Whiteline's, they've served me very well to-date. Reason I chose Whiteline initially over Swift aside from having a full catalog car was to have a stiffer Front Spring Rate versus Rear. Swift is the opposite having stiffer Rear Spring Rate, and having a 26mm RSB I wasn't feeling too comfortable pairing the two up. Here's the spring rate comparison from the thread link shared above:

SI OEM
Front Spring Rate: 144.186 lbs/in
Rear Spring Rate: 208.776 lbs/in

Whiteline:
Spring Rate (Progressive)
Front 253 lb/in
Rear 286 lb/in

Swift:
Spring Rate (Dual)
Front 229.5 lbs/in
Rear 319.2 lbs/in
 
OP
CanadiaegeanBlue

CanadiaegeanBlue

Senior Member
First Name
Humza
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
865
Reaction score
1,498
Location
Toronto
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Si Sedan - Aegean Blue Metallic
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #251
Earlier this month, sold the Brembo kit to a friend along with my BBS Wheels. There's some time till my next set of wheels, Enkei PF09 and StopTech BBK arrive so I went back to Si calipers + factory Blank Rotors with EBC Yellow Pads. Ideally, I would have gone with the StopTech Slotted Rotors I carry but this setup will only be used for a month or so till the StopTech BBK with 330mm Slotted Rotors comes in, and there's a manufacturer shortage on StopTech Slotted Si Rotors so I didn't feel the need to hog up a pair; i've already tested them with a friend previously to know they work well :)

Will change out the factory rear rotors to StopTech Slotted with EBC Yellows as well, and hope to attend at least 1 HPDE event in April!

IMG_20210306_203520.jpg


DSC_2170.JPG
 
OP
CanadiaegeanBlue

CanadiaegeanBlue

Senior Member
First Name
Humza
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
865
Reaction score
1,498
Location
Toronto
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Si Sedan - Aegean Blue Metallic
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #252
Winter setup changed over to the new summer setup :)

Superspeed RF05RR 18x8.5 ET35 with 255/35R18 Yokohama ADO8R tires. Fresh oil change, as well as adding the Whiteline Adjustable Lower Ball Joints. Alignment: Slight Toe-in Front, -1.7 Camber Front, 0 Toe Rear, -2 Camber Rear.

Rear is pretty flush, Front has about 3mm of poke. 1 or 2 instances of very slight rub so far on large dips, not concerned as audibly it's the slightest of contacts.

Steering feel is pretty hyper active I would say, I've had to adjust how much input I give because it wants to turn right away. Need to change out rear brakes and pads, then ready for a track day once we get out of lockdown here in Toronto!

DSC_2248.JPG
DSC_2253.JPG
DSC_2259.JPG
DSC_2266.JPG
DSC_2269.JPG
 

V3N0M_VZL4

Senior Member
First Name
Mauricio
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Messages
311
Reaction score
97
Location
Miami, Florida
Car(s)
2019 Civic Sport
Country flag
Winter setup changed over to the new summer setup :)

Superspeed RF05RR 18x8.5 ET35 with 255/35R18 Yokohama ADO8R tires. Fresh oil change, as well as adding the Whiteline Adjustable Lower Ball Joints. Alignment: Slight Toe-in Front, -1.7 Camber Front, 0 Toe Rear, -2 Camber Rear.

Rear is pretty flush, Front has about 3mm of poke. 1 or 2 instances of very slight rub so far on large dips, not concerned as audibly it's the slightest of contacts.

Steering feel is pretty hyper active I would say, I've had to adjust how much input I give because it wants to turn right away. Need to change out rear brakes and pads, then ready for a track day once we get out of lockdown here in Toronto!

DSC_2248.JPG
DSC_2253.JPG
DSC_2259.JPG
DSC_2266.JPG
DSC_2269.JPG
Congratulations with the new type r Humza, where I can read about the benefits of the lower ball joints? The installation is easy?
 
OP
CanadiaegeanBlue

CanadiaegeanBlue

Senior Member
First Name
Humza
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
865
Reaction score
1,498
Location
Toronto
Car(s)
2017 Honda Civic Si Sedan - Aegean Blue Metallic
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #254
Congratulations with the new type r Humza, where I can read about the benefits of the lower ball joints? The installation is easy?
Thank you! Funny you saw that already I suppose on Instagram; yes sir I will share that shortly as well here :)

I gave @Thusee the first set of ball joints, he posted a great write-up in his build thread including install:
https://www.civicx.com/forum/thread...l-floor-lights-done-page-14.45436/post-915314

The combination of the tires, alignment, and ball joint have made the Si an even quicker responding car to steering inputs. I should be able to push faster into turns with less understeer. My setup was pretty good last year, but I discovered the limits at the track, and knew what I needed for this year
 

arpypat

Senior Member
First Name
Arpan
Joined
Jun 29, 2019
Messages
1,398
Reaction score
1,778
Location
KC
Car(s)
2019 Civic Si
Build Thread
Link
Vehicle Showcase
1
Country flag
I know what you mean with the hyperactive steering input! After switching out to 18x9 +45 wheels w/ 255/35 summer rubber, the time between moving my steering wheel and the wheels actually turning is stupid quick. Definitely an adjustment for sure.

I also feel like I have to make more minor corrections to the steering wheel and I experience a little tramlining compared to the stock wheel/tire setup.
 

Advertisement






Advertisement
Top