2020 Type-R Parts

Iilac

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They might put a disclaimer for these new brakes, like they do with the tires in not operating on them under cold/freezing temperature.



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davemarco

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Do we know if the new struts come with a new electronic controller of some kind? Is the steering rack the same?
 

willskiGT

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They might put a disclaimer for these new brakes, like they do with the tires in not operating on them under cold/freezing temperature.
What? Outside air temperature does not affect 2-piece rotors any differently than a standard 1-piece cast iron rotor. I don't understand where this is coming from.
 

erbee

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Cool that you wrapped your rotors.

Someone puts something on a car and it's "fine"...sure. OEM or not, your warping rotors are due to shitty conditions...go figure.

Yes yes yes. But you know what? My car has 28k miles and I burned the factory set tires. Immediately swap them with a set of APEX EC-7 18's from my M3 . And used up set of RE71R . A set of 595 RS-RR. A now I'm on a set of VENTUS RS4 that are almost bald but has the longest life of them all . Oh and yes 2nd set of front pads and 3rd set of rears. AND I'M STILL ON FACTORY ROTORS.


Yes my driving is probably the "shitty condition" for the car . If the new rotor isn't good i can always buy the old design one . Those are cheaper too.
 

Iilac

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What? Outside air temperature does not affect 2-piece rotors any differently than a standard 1-piece cast iron rotor. I don't understand where this is coming from.
Not sure if they will be affected or not but disclaimer was put for the tires when the vehicle was tested for hot, cold and high altitude and the tires should not be operated at certain temperatures. If the rotors do have temperature requirement, then a disclaimer can be put on them like they did with tires.
 

willskiGT

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Not sure if they will be affected or not but disclaimer was put for the tires when the vehicle was tested for hot, cold and high altitude and the tires should not be operated at certain temperatures. If the rotors do have temperature requirement, then a disclaimer can be put on them like they did with tires.
:doh:

They will not be affected. The 2 things are entirely unrelated. It's like saying that you should not use the radio if the humidity is over 60% because the tires should not be used in certain temperatures...

Literally hundreds (maybe thousands at this point) of models of vehicles have had 2-piece rotors stock. None of them have external-temperature-based brake use restrictions. It would be nonsensical.

2-piece floating rotors behave the same as a standard 1 piece rotor, but reduce unsprung weight and (if you can find the parts) allow cheaper brake replacements via replacing only the outer cast iron rotor ring.
 

DRKSYD

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You literally have no idea what you are talking about. The OEM pads have an operating range of 50F to around 600F. In a single low speed stop (hence my 25 mph estimate), the pads will easily reach 50F, even if the outside temperature is 0F. If the pads weren't reaching operating temperature, the car would take an extremely long distance to stop, like race pads do when they are not up to temp.

My OEM pads were not noisy in the summer, nor are they noisy now in the winter. They were very noisy in the fall (in temps ranging from 90F to 40F) after a track day because I got pad material/pad adhesive smeared all over the rotors from overheating the brakes. Once that material was worn away, the brakes were back to not being noisy.

It's difficult to follow what you're saying in your posts because you jump from topic to topic seemingly at random. Somehow you think the pads (and the rotors, not sure because your post is incoherent) are not made for certain climates, which makes no sense, because the OEM brake setup (and the rest of the car) was certainly tested in hot, cold, and high altitude conditions.

The 2020 Civic Type R rotors are 2-piece floating rotors. Brembo does not manufacture 2-piece non-floating rotors.



Could you please stop posting this nonsense? They are 2-piece floating rotors, the photos are right in front of your face to see. Again, "type of weather" has nothing to do with what sort of brake rotor you should have on your car.



It's just pad deposits on your rotor, not warping. Switch to a more aggressive pad or just drive around for 2-3 weeks without any canyon runs and the vibrations will go away as the rotor face cleans up.
Lol. They aren't and you're wrong. But carry on, run those floaters in the snow .
 

DRKSYD

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:doh:

They will not be affected. The 2 things are entirely unrelated. It's like saying that you should not use the radio if the humidity is over 60% because the tires should not be used in certain temperatures...

Literally hundreds (maybe thousands at this point) of models of vehicles have had 2-piece rotors stock. None of them have external-temperature-based brake use restrictions. It would be nonsensical.

2-piece floating rotors behave the same as a standard 1 piece rotor, but reduce unsprung weight and (if you can find the parts) allow cheaper brake replacements via replacing only the outer cast iron rotor ring.
Thousands of models have 2 piece rotors?
 

Iilac

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:doh:

They will not be affected. The 2 things are entirely unrelated. It's like saying that you should not use the radio if the humidity is over 60% because the tires should not be used in certain temperatures...

Literally hundreds (maybe thousands at this point) of models of vehicles have had 2-piece rotors stock. None of them have external-temperature-based brake use restrictions. It would be nonsensical.

2-piece floating rotors behave the same as a standard 1 piece rotor, but reduce unsprung weight and (if you can find the parts) allow cheaper brake replacements via replacing only the outer cast iron rotor ring.

So a pad and a tire can be affected by temperature but a rotor can't? I not saying it's much but that's asinine to say for certain that a metal does not get affected by temperature somewhat.
 

willskiGT

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Lol. They aren't and you're wrong. But carry on, run those floaters in the snow .
Can you clarify for me what you believe happens with 2-piece rotors in inclement weather?

They are floating 2-piece rotors. Just as a heads up since you don't know what 2-piece rotors are, a 2-piece floating rotor consists of the following:

-Aluminum hat
-Cast iron rotor ring
-The aluminum hat and cast iron rotor ring are joined by bolts with spring pins that sit in oversized slots in the aluminum hat that allow the cast iron rotor rings to "float" on the hat when undergoing thermal expansion

As you can see from the multitude of photos already posted in this thread, the 2020 Civic Type R rotors have: an aluminum hat, cast iron rotor rings, bolts with spring pins, and oversize holes in the aluminum hat. Therefore, they are considered 2-piece floating rotors. I hope this was informative for you.

Thousands of models have 2 piece rotors?
It's probably getting close, maybe a bit high of an estimate. I would consider different generations of the same vehicle separate models.

Audi alone has a couple dozen as an example:

RS4 (3 generations)
RS5 (2 generations)
RS5 Sportback
RS3 (2 generations)
R8 (2 generations)
RS6 (4 generations)
RS7
TT RS (2 generations)
RS Q3
RS Q3 Sportback
RS Q8
S8 (2 generations)

So a pad and a tire can be affected by temperature but a rotor can't? I not saying it's much but that's asinine to say for certain that a metal does not get affected by temperature somewhat.
Well, each of those 3 components are made up of very different materials, so it's a nonsensical comparison. Like worrying that you shouldn't operate the car in low temps because your exhaust might break or something similarly pointless.

Just looking at the temperature ranges for each (from glass transition to "overheating/melting"):

Summer Tire: 15F - 200F
OEM brake pad: Unknown (50F is bottom end of working range but not glass transition) - 600F
Cast iron: -150F to 2500F

Cast iron has a melting point of over 2500F, and the temperatures required to cause a brittle fracture (like you might find in a summer tire at <15F) are much colder than any found naturally on earth (colder than -150F). So unless you plan on driving your car in liquid nitrogen (which again, would result in any type of brake rotor being damaged), you are all set.

In addition, a 2-piece rotor has the same friction surface (cast iron) as a standard rotor, so the metal would react in the same way regardless of rotor type. It's simply not a concern and it feels a little bit insane to even have to explain this to folks.
 
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erbee

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I do canyons , A lot of canyons ....... still on factory rotors ...Can't wait for the new setup .


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davemarco

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So.... we're not sure if there's a new electronic controller to go with the new shocks then?
 

tinyman392

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How so? Can't seeing camber at rear providing a more shitty "comfort" mode than already exists. Sport mode actually feels better over anything harsh as it keeps you from feeling like you drive a truck or worse. More grip in R+ mode? meaning camber if that was true...but anyone reading these threads would have already surpassed any OEM camber requirement, or replaced it with something truly adjustable. Parts they are replacing are to fit the OEM 20"s....people can't understand that. Whether control arms, steering, rotors, etc, they tweaked it to feel better on the OEM rims/Tires.....how many still have those, and before you answer...how many still want those?
I'm basically chiming off what Honda said in their press release. The car hasn't been released to the public yet, so anything stated is technically speculation.
 

                           

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