2016 Honda Civic 1.5T and 2.0L engines technical presentation (specs, pics, videos)

jks

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I don't understand how Honda can run its 16.5 psi boost turbo engine on 87 octane gasoline. That kind of boost raises the effective compression ratio sky-high. All of the high-boost turbo engines I'm familiar with need the highest octane fuel they can get. Does anyone know how Honda has managed this feat?
They could control CR with variable valve timing. They could delay opening the intake valves (ala simulated Atkinson cycle), shortening the intake stroke in relation to the power stroke. Also, turbo engines usually start with a low CR without the boost.



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I don't understand how Honda can run its 16.5 psi boost turbo engine on 87 octane gasoline. That kind of boost raises the effective compression ratio sky-high. All of the high-boost turbo engines I'm familiar with need the highest octane fuel they can get. Does anyone know how Honda has managed this feat?
Direct Injection. CR can go up across both N/A and FI engine types because the fuel being directly sprayed into the cylinder greatly reduces the threshold of pre-ignition, which is why PFI engines generally run lower CR.
 

Ammo

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I don't understand how Honda can run its 16.5 psi boost turbo engine on 87 octane gasoline. That kind of boost raises the effective compression ratio sky-high. All of the high-boost turbo engines I'm familiar with need the highest octane fuel they can get. Does anyone know how Honda has managed this feat?
Most turbos these days don't require premium unless they're high performance engines. EcoBoosts, for example, run on 87.
 

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I just posted this in another thread regarding any VTC / VTEC confusion there might be on these engines. Thought it might help to have it here in the sticky.

For the US, the 1.5T only has dual overhead cam phasing control (VTC), but no variable lift (VTEC).

The 2.0L is a modern day K20, but with VTC on both the exhaust and intake cams, and variable lift (VTEC) on the intake side. Compare this to past K series motors which had VTEC on either/both intake and exhaust sides, and only VTC on intake side.
 

TyBu

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There an original version of that torque curve graph?
 

My2016Civic

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Good details..

Do you know if our Civic X CVT's are Steel Belt, Steel Chain, Rubber Belt? I've seen it referred to as "High Rigidity Belt" but that is very obscure as to the material or durability.
 

dhiraj113

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This could be a very naive question, but are any of you concerned about the durability of the Turbo engine? Would turbo engine be a cause of concern, say if you think about the resale value 10 years down the lane. I have read comments over the internet which say that all Turbo engines fail, it's only a matter of time. I would really appreciate if somebody who really understands how engines works puts his perspective.
 

Wyborowa

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What about the Manuel transmission in the LX on the 2.0 n/a?
How well built is the manual transmission and how much more power can the 6spd tranny take? Or is the first worry about the engine internals when wanting to add performance parts to the 2.0 ?
 

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I'm not sure, but I wonder if the manual in for the 2.0 NA was strong enough to handle the power of the turbo? Just a guess, but maybe not over c. 20 years and 200k miles? In that case they'd need to develop a new manual, or maybe bring one over from the Accord? The Civic Turbo is paired with a version of the Accord's heavy duty CVT, to handle the extra power and torque, while the 2.0 gets an updated version of the CVT from the last generation of Civic.
a manual is stronger than a CVT
 

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I don't understand how Honda can run its 16.5 psi boost turbo engine on 87 octane gasoline. That kind of boost raises the effective compression ratio sky-high. All of the high-boost turbo engines I'm familiar with need the highest octane fuel they can get. Does anyone know how Honda has managed this feat?
Yes, they severely retard the timing when at high boost levels. Reduces power, but also reduces detonation
 

planedoc

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Good details..

Do you know if our Civic X CVT's are Steel Belt, Steel Chain, Rubber Belt? I've seen it referred to as "High Rigidity Belt" but that is very obscure as to the material or durability.
I'm sure it is a steel belt. Although haven't seen inside. But a rubber CVT belt would wear out in days, not years...
 

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I just posted this in another thread regarding any VTC / VTEC confusion there might be on these engines. Thought it might help to have it here in the sticky.

For the US, the 1.5T only has dual overhead cam phasing control (VTC), but no variable lift (VTEC).

The 2.0L is a modern day K20, but with VTC on both the exhaust and intake cams, and variable lift (VTEC) on the intake side. Compare this to past K series motors which had VTEC on either/both intake and exhaust sides, and only VTC on intake side.
Is there a reason why Honda refers to the 1.5l in weird ways such as "VTEC based" or "as the VTEC TURBO"?

"VTEC TURBO engine produces more torque than the 2L naturally-aspirated engine, thanks to its turbo. The VTEC TURBO allows a small, 1.5L engine to perform as well as a 2L engine."
http://world.honda.com/automobile-technology/vtec-turbo/

My understanding is that the 1.5l turbo is just dual VTC but Honda makes this very confusing when their earth dreams branch refers to the 1.5l turbo engine as such "
1.5L class Gasoline engine: Extensive friction reduction measures achieved through the use of VTC based on DOHC and VTEC technology" (gives credit to just being dual VTC but also odd how VTC is based on VTEC) .
http://world.honda.com/EarthDreamsTechnology/

It also doesn't help much when the new dual VTC 1.5l turbo is referenced like this:

Or when you search "1.5L VTEC turbo" you get loads of results saying that the engine is VTEC. And unless VTEC came to mean something different to Honda today, it most certainly isn't VTEC as long as it is just dual VTC.

Just odd.

 

L8apex

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And unless VTEC came to mean something different to Honda today, it most certainly isn't VTEC as long as it is just dual VTC.

Just odd.
Sorry, a little late to the game, I only got my Civic over a month ago and I haven't been this knee-deep in the Honda scene in years. But I was wondering this too. Back when Honda released VTEC to the public in the early 90s, it stood for Variable Valve Timing and Electronic (actually Hydraulic) Lift Control. But VVTELC didn't really roll off the tongue.

Then the K-series comes out with VTC and it’s called iVTEC, for intelligent vtec apparently.

Now the Civic’s L15 has VTC but no higher duration and lift profile on the cams. Does it deserve to be called VTEC? I think it’s always been a marketing thing for Honda, whatever the letters actually stood for.
 
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