1.5t vs 2.0 engine

charleswrivers

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Yes I'm a hater, hate peeps that can't comprehend simple statements. Like mpg is so close it does not matter. Epa, and my experience say so. Continually bringing up factoids to perpetuate your position means your hating on, not necessarily hate. Today they call it shaming vs bullying in past times. Think about it. I generally respect your posts but, but not when you knit pick on subjects and don't let them go (very seldom ).
I see the same responders, to these vs threads, and they don't seem to comprehend the entire statement. Such as close, doesn't matter, similar, tuned and non tuned.
To wit: a tuned 2.0 is so close to the 1.5 only gets fan boy responses from turbo owners.
That's not my intention... and certainly don't want to shame someone into facts, or nit pick them to death with my lack of comprehension. I'll set it to where I don't see any further postings from you so I won't ever be tempted to do so again. I simply cannot help to try to provide backed up, factual information as best I can to counter a statement I see as wrong... though I am certainly not infallible myself. Peace.





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CBR600F4i

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If we're not going to believe the EPAs loop... and say real world data is what counts... then a quick look a fuelly will show that the 1.5 is still the more efficient engine for miles per gallon from all the data accumulated over 4 years.

2.0

http://www.fuelly.com/car/honda/civic?engineconfig_id=13&bodytype_id=&submodel_id=

1.5

http://www.fuelly.com/car/honda/civic?engineconfig_id=37&bodytype_id=&submodel_id=

There was also a comparo done on Car and Driver:

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a...honda-civics-turbo-vs-non-turbo-fuel-economy/

There's no shame in it... it just makes sense. It has smaller pistons so less of a contact patch at the rings for friction, and DI to allow a stratified burn when cruising at low load. The difference isn't extreme and it'd take a long time to recoup the cost of, say, an LX vs another trim with the L15B7. At that point though... one should be looking at the optional equipment the higher trims give or the added performance brakes/suspension provides if that's what someone is after. The Canadian LX is supposed to pretty well equipped however, so what we have in states may not apply to the OP.
I just said don't believe spec sheets and this guy brings up spec sheets. LUL
 

THATSi

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Just my two cents cuz I keep seeing oil dilution, oil dilution, and more oil dilution. I have a 17 Si, L15B7, worth mentioning a few things before going forward, the car is heavily modified, as in I've maxed it to the limit of the stock fuel system. Also to note, I live in FL, it doesn't get "cold" here. Cuz I kept seeing oil dilution, I decided to have the oil tested, not once but 3 times, ran the oil life as low as 5%, still not diluted in any test. Few other notes, a lot of car manufacturers are now going turbo for if no other reason the higher the gas mileage rating from the EPA, the less tax they have to pay on the car. Here's the thing about turbos and cold weather or even in nicer weather, don't go slamming the pedal to the floor when the car is cold, definitely under 100 degrees. Lot of boost under cold engine temps is not good for your motor. Warm it up before you commute, even if it's just down the road 5 min. Your engine will thank you and perform great for a long time. It's not good to do to any motor really, when I lived in Ohio and it was cold people floored it everywhere in the morning cuz it was "faster" when it was cold, it is, don't get me wrong, but you're hurting the moment, specifically doing it 6 months out of the year, and even more so with turbos. If you got a remote start, use it.
 

AegeanT

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Just my two cents cuz I keep seeing oil dilution, oil dilution, and more oil dilution. I have a 17 Si, L15B7, worth mentioning a few things before going forward, the car is heavily modified, as in I've maxed it to the limit of the stock fuel system. Also to note, I live in FL, it doesn't get "cold" here. Cuz I kept seeing oil dilution, I decided to have the oil tested, not once but 3 times, ran the oil life as low as 5%, still not diluted in any test. Few other notes, a lot of car manufacturers are now going turbo for if no other reason the higher the gas mileage rating from the EPA, the less tax they have to pay on the car. Here's the thing about turbos and cold weather or even in nicer weather, don't go slamming the pedal to the floor when the car is cold, definitely under 100 degrees. Lot of boost under cold engine temps is not good for your motor. Warm it up before you commute, even if it's just down the road 5 min. Your engine will thank you and perform great for a long time. It's not good to do to any motor really, when I lived in Ohio and it was cold people floored it everywhere in the morning cuz it was "faster" when it was cold, it is, don't get me wrong, but you're hurting the moment, specifically doing it 6 months out of the year, and even more so with turbos. If you got a remote start, use it.
Dilution is actually common amongst a lot of the new more efficient turbocharged engines, just some are negligible on the test.. As for the L15B7, the key is to warm it up thoroughly and long drives, especially in cold climates. It loses heat quickly, I’ve never seen another engine do that, but it is a small displacement motor propelling the civic/accord/CR-V.

My parents have the oil dilution problem with their CR-V, 2018, but that’s because the drives are less than 2-3 km at a time. The engine doesn’t have time to warm up. My mom does a trip once a month that’s 15 km one way and I even say that’s not very long.

I racked up almost 50k km on my 16 Touring before I sold it in a year and not one single issue of oil dilution. My 19 Si is looking the same as well. But I drive a lot in the city and highway, and I don’t baby it when it’s warmed up.

Do your regular maintenance intervals, and you’ll have zero regrets about the 1.5T. I’ve seen tons of high mileage turbocharged engines from Honda so far and none have blown up yet, specifically the 1.5.

Then again, the 2.0 is NA and proven, but the 1.5 has the fun factor to it, and it’s more fuel efficient. Pick your poison!
 

Erin Tyres

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This has me thinking if maybe I should get the sedan sport with the proven 2.0 engine ...
When I bought my Civic, only the turbocharged models had heated seats. I did not really need the turbo's extra horsepower or slightly better fuel economy, but I was determined to not go through another winter without heated seats.
 

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Get more air in the 2.0 and a tune and it will be a fun car.guys with the turbo acting like they have a rocket ship.sorry u don't even push 200 hp
 

gtman

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Get more air in the 2.0 and a tune and it will be a fun car.guys with the turbo acting like they have a rocket ship.sorry u don't even push 200 hp
The 1.5T is not a rocket ship but the turbo's broad torque curve does give it a solid low/mid feel. And when the turbo spools up (like when you pass on the highway) it does feel surprisingly quick. Tuning increases the fun factor a lot. The TSP tune produces 220hp/250tq in the non-Si which is really good.

But here's the thing, no one has said the 2.0 isn't a fine engine, especially combined with the manual. In terms of cost/fun factor/reliability it may actually be the best combo.
----------------

In terms of the oil dilution anxiety/mania, it's absolutely overblown. Sure, if you only take 2 mile trips and change the oil infrequently, you might have issues. But, let it warm to normal operating temps and change the oil regularly and on time and the 1.5T will be fine.
 
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gtman

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They are both efficient engines. The turbo is super fuel efficient when cruising and out of boost. In city driving, with slow and go traffic, the NA engine wins because the turbo will be in and out of boost.

As far as the which is the better overall engine argument, they both win. They both are fuel efficient. And they both are high up in terms of power compared to other brands competing cars. It really boils down to what someone is looking for in a car...

Here's my rundown of the 1.5 and 2.0 setups (just my opinion, others may disagree):

1.5T Si: Nice combination of power and handling. Stock, it could be faster. Tuned it's near perfection.

2.0 w/6 speed: Good combo with a bit of an old school Honda feel. Not fast, but for the money, a fun ride.

1.5T (non-Si) w/6 speed: Another good combination. Sort of an Si lite, without the LSD.

1.5T (non-Si) CVT: Good combo for most situations but the CVT takes away from the excitement. The secret sauce for this car is a tune. Tuning turns it into a rather fun machine even with the CVT.

2.0 w/CVT: The Civic most people buy and a solid, reliable everyday ride. Wakes up a bit with a tune.

Feel free to discuss, agree, disagree, complain, etc... :cool:
 
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Gruber

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The use of terms like: "hating on", "shaming," or "bullying" really feels like high school and smells like teen spirit.

So I want to inject here some hot testosterone and brutal hard hitting facts.

I understand that some vulnerable persons may feel like their feelings feel hurt, and of course, whatever feels good to your feelings, feels nice and warm.
All engines are of course created equal and each has it's merits (yeah, right). If you like it, that's all that matters. Discriminating against any engine and dissing some technologies is cruel and hurts people. People fell unsafe if someone hates on their engine. :cry:

But then I'm a macho guy who likes to win, I don't care, and my stool is full of chunks of lame slow sucking engines. If you like to win, you drive turbocharged. Turbocharged engines are winners, because turbocharged engines are unquestionably better.:catfight:

When I think of winning, F1 may come to mind.

"Formula One currently uses 1.6 litre four-stroke turbocharged 90 degree V6 reciprocating engines."

"In November 2018, Honda F1 division entered into a two-year partnership with IHI, in order to develop turbochargers."

When I think more about winning, bull market, crushing the competition, market share might also come to mind. :bat:
In the US in 2006 5.8% of passenger vehicles (cars and light trucks) manufactured were turbocharged, and almost 3/4 of those were turbodiesels.
For the 2017 model year, 27.6% were turbocharged and only 11% of these were diesel. Turbo gas engine is recently unstoppable :spaz:among ICEs. There are three reasons why it wins, and these three reasons will never go away: 1. Emissions, 2. Emissions, and 3. Emissions.

There is no return to the NA engine. The turbo will keep winning and winning in the future, so that everyone who owns a turbo car will get tired of winning. If you like your NA engine, you can keep it, and enjoy your slow sucker as long as it lasts, but frankly, you should be ashamed of yourself, and besides, you may have trouble buying the next one.:rofl: All I can recommend to you, vulnerable owners of low pressure suckers is: get an emotional support animal or two and buy yourself a turbo, because it's a jungle out there.


https://www.thedrive.com/news/13268...-at-record-high-in-new-cars-in-u-s-study-says
 
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AegeanT

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The use of terms like: "hating on", "shaming," or "bullying" really feels like high school and smells like teen spirit.

So I want to inject here some hot testosterone and brutal hard hitting facts.

I understand that some vulnerable persons may feel like their feelings feel hurt, and of course, whatever feels good to your feelings, feels nice and warm.
All engines are of course created equal and each has it's merits (yeah, right). If you like it, that's all that matters. Discriminating against any engine and dissing some technologies is cruel and hurts people. People fell unsafe if someone hates on their engine. :cry:

But then I'm a macho guy who likes to win, I don't care, and my stool is full of chunks of lame slow sucking engines. If you like to win, you drive turbocharged. Turbocharged engines are winners, because turbocharged engines are unquestionably better.:catfight:

When I think of winning, F1 may come to mind.

"Formula One currently uses 1.6 litre four-stroke turbocharged 90 degree V6 reciprocating engines."

"In November 2018, Honda F1 division entered into a two-year partnership with IHI, in order to develop turbochargers."

When I think more about winning, bull market, crushing the competition, market share might also come to mind. :bat:
In the US in 2006 5.8% of passenger vehicles (cars and light trucks) manufactured were turbocharged, and almost 3/4 of those were turbodiesels.
For the 2017 model year, 27.6% were turbocharged and only 11% of these were diesel. Turbo gas engine is recently unstoppable :spaz:among ICEs. There are three reasons, why it wins, and these three reasons will never go away: 1. Emissions, 2. Emissions, and 3. Emissions.

There is no return to the NA engine. The turbo will keep winning and winning in the future, so that everyone who owns a turbo car will get tired of winning. If you like your NA engine, you can keep it, and enjoy your slow sucker as long as it lasts, but frankly, you should be ashamed of yourself, and besides, you may have trouble buying the next one.:rofl: All I can recommend to you, vulnerable owners of low pressure suckers is: get an emotional support animal or two and buy yourself a turbo, because it's a jungle out there.


https://www.thedrive.com/news/13268...-at-record-high-in-new-cars-in-u-s-study-says
I was always one of the ones that loved the NA J35 series V6 made by Honda. My subjective opinion was that it was the best engine made and I would never see myself getting a Turbocharged 4 cylinder when the 2.0 Turbo came out for the Accord, always NA or go home.

Now that I've had the Civics with the 1.5 Turbo, I'll never look back. Initially I missed the growl of the V6 but I needed something more economical and the 2.0 NA in the Civic didn't do me enough justice when I first shopped a few years ago. The turbos are more efficient, fun to drive, and have tons of potential. They've shown their reliability as well and Honda has once again outdone themselves.

Though i won't lie, reliability of the 2.0 is definitely there and they're a solid engine with decent power. But they won't be around much longer IMO, and I was surprised that with the 2020 refresh that they didn't D/C it completely in Canada.
 

mvela

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I have both the 2.0 NA and 1.5t. Yes the 1.5t is faster but faster is not always more fun. When I want fun I drive my fast revving, instant power, manual 2.0. I love the power of the 1.5t but I still appreciate the 2.0’s response. If that makes any sense to anybody? But if I want to race 1/4 mile then I’ll use the 1.5t
 

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I have both the 2.0 NA and 1.5t. Yes the 1.5t is faster but faster is not always more fun. When I want fun I drive my fast revving, instant power, manual 2.0. I love the power of the 1.5t but I still appreciate the 2.0’s response. If that makes any sense to anybody? But if I want to race 1/4 mile then I’ll use the 1.5t
It makes perfect sense and it's exactly what I've been saying. For some reason there are members here that think we are dissing the 2.0 because it's slower than the 1.5T... it's just a fact. But like you said and I said, it can be really fun to wring out a lower powered car to redline.

Maybe it's an age thing (I'm old) but I don't get butthurt if someone tells me they have a faster car than mine. I'm satisfied with my car even though I know many people on this forum have faster ones. And as a guy who has mostly driven manuals, I readily admit my current car's CVT can't hold a candle to the manual in terms of control and fun. Yet at the same time my CVT, 1.5T and TSP Stage 1 create a surprising fun ride.
 
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mvela

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It makes perfect sense and it's exactly what I've been saying. For some reason there are members here that think we are dissing the 2.0 because it's slower than the 1.5T... it's just a fact. But like you said and I said, it can be really fun to wring out a lower powered car to redline.

Maybe it's an age thing (I'm old) but I don't get butthurt if someone tells me they have a faster car than mine. I'm satisfied with my car even though I know many people on this forum have faster ones. And as a guy who has mostly driven manuals, I readily admit my current car's CVT can't hold a candle to the manual in terms of control and fun. Yet at the same time my CVT, 1.5T and TSP Stage 1 create a surprising fun ride.
Yeah they are all fun in their own way. And you are right, there will always be a faster car. So if anybody wants to buy a civic they need to just test drive them all and see what they like best because everyone has different expectations from their vehicle. Now if someone just wants the fastest civic possible then they need to get the type R
 

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